»Course Descriptions

+-Spring 2015

Advanced Federal Income Tax (2) Law-7879
This course is a continuation of the basic Federal Income Taxation course. It includes federal income tax topics that are not generally addressed in detail or at all in the basic course, such as in-depth coverage of tax accounting issues, taxation of intellectual property, taxation within families, tax consequences of litigation, alternative minimum tax, employee benefits and deferred compensation, and the fundamentals of business entity taxation and international taxation. This course is a core requirement for the Taxation certificate. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803
This course will focus on the resources, process and strategy of legal research. The course will include instruction on primary law such as legislative and administrative documents, and secondary sources, including practice materials. Students will be required to complete several research assignments to demonstrate competence using print and online resources to research and analyze legal issues. There is no final exam. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Seminar: Holocaust (2) Law-7823
This course examines international human rights law through the legacy of the Holocaust. Topics to be covered are: 1) the legal system of Nazi Germany; 2) prosecution of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg and subsequent prosecutions under national legal systems, including the Eichmann trial in Israel, and the work in the United States of the Office of Special Investigations in the U.S. Department of Justice; 3) Holocaust denial, including the Irving v. Lipstadt trial in England; 4) Holocaust and the internet, including the Yahoo decisions in France and the United States and laws in various European nations dealing with hate speech and glorification of the Nazi era; 5) Holocaust restitution litigation in the United States to recover stolen wartime assets, including Nazi looted art; and 6) the legal legacy of the Holocaust upon the current International Criminal Court. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing requirement.

Advanced Seminar: Copyright Law (3) Law-7822
This course offers an in-depth analysis of the rights and remedies afforded to copyright owners under U.S. law. We will discuss the theoretical, economic and policy aspects of copyright law and engage in a number of practical exercises such as preparing correspondence with (hypothetical) clients, cease and desist letters, legal memoranda and licensing agreements. Work prepared for these practical exercises will apply toward satisfying the course’s writing requirement (which is in lieu of a final exam). At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret and apply the statutory provisions, and to identify and articulate the scope of U.S. copyright protection and its limitations, the essential elements of a copyright infringement claim, the defenses and strategies available to a defendant, and the related bodies of law typically involved in copyright disputes. The classes will focus on applying case law and the statute to various hypothetical situations with the goal of preparing students to handle the copyright issues and problems typically encountered by a lawyer in practice. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Advanced Topic: Litigating California Regulations (3) Law-7662
Litigating California Regulations. From theory to “nuts & bolts,” this course covers how state and local entities promulgate regulations, the constitutional and statutory authority for those regulations, challenging and defending the regulations, and the process of litigating regulatory violations and appealing administrative decisions in California courts. During the course, students will apply what they have learned by crafting the necessary substantive pleadings to challenge or defend an administrative decision. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Agency and Partnership (3) Law-7507 California Bar Tested
This course covers the law of agency and unincorporated business entities. The course will explore the definition and nature of a principal-agent relationship; the rights and duties of principals and agents; the scope of agents’ actual and apparent authority; the liability of disclosed and undisclosed principals for agents’ acts; agent fiduciary duties; third party rights and remedies; employer-employee and independent contractor relationships. The course also addresses the nature of unincorporated business entities, including general and limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships and limited liability companies. Students will study statutory and case law discussing the formation, operation and management of these entities, and students will learn the basic internal/external rights, powers, duties and liabilities of the entity members vis-à-vis one another and vis-à-vis outside third parties. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Anatomy of an International Tech Acquisition: A Business Transaction Workshop (3) Law-7663
This course will provide a practical, workshop-style introduction to business transactional practice by ‘working’ an international tech acquisition hypothetical involving a foreign multinational purchasing the assets or capital stock of a California technology company. The purchase/sale transaction will begin at the preliminary letter of intent stage and proceed through “due diligence” and definitive agreement stages. Students will be divided into deal teams representing purchaser and seller (i.e., ‘clients’) with the goal of emulating law firm associates tasked to perform a variety of research and drafting tasks. This is not a course on mergers and acquisitions per se. The primary objective of this course is development and/or enhancement of analytical reasoning and practical drafting skills (including related negotiation and client representation) in the business transactional arena. Assignments will include drafting case research memoranda, letters of intent, employment and non-competition agreements and purchase/sale transaction agreement provisions drawing on templates made available to students via the class intranet site. Students may be asked to ‘role play’ key principals in the transaction from time to time to highlight purchaser/seller negotiation strategies. Expert practitioners - deal team ‘mentors’ - from the Orange County legal and business communities will also participate in certain classes. Prerequisite: Contracts I and II. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Animal Law (3) Law-7544
In this course, we will consider a series of topics that come under the general heading “animal law.” We will address the extent to which the legal system, specific cases, legislation and background cultural values have affected, and will continue to affect, the ways in which judges, administrators, politicians, lawyers, law students, legal scholars and lay people see and speak about animals other than humans. This course will focus on the evolution, interpretation and enforcement of laws relating to the use and treatment of animals in our society; evaluation of whether, how and why such laws should be modified; and the possible ramifications of such change. The course will cover a wide array of animal law issues, including the legal classification of animals as property, loss of companionship/emotional distress, veterinary malpractice, anti-cruelty laws, constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals and the development of laws relating to commercial uses of animals. Although the casebook touches on wildlife and endangered species protection issues, for the most part this course will leave those issues for other courses to cover.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part II (3) Law-7805
This advanced course will cover both individual and business reorganizations in Chapter 11, including assumption and rejection of leases and other executory contracts, preparation of disclosure statements, and negotiation and confirmation of plans. Students will be expected to engage in role-playing exercise(s) to simulate the competing interests of debtor, unsecured creditors and secured creditors in the reorganization effort. Prerequisite: Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice Part I. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Business Planning (2) Law-7515
The goal of this course, through reviewing actual documents and agreements (and through class discussion), is to have students become familiar with certain legal and business relationships/issues raised in documents, business agreements and other contracts — from a practical (real life) perspective. Generally, class discussions track the formation, growth and eventual sale of a California business. We begin by analyzing and comparing different business entity structures. We then examine the relationship and conflicting motivations of owners, officers and employees of the business. With the growth of the business, we move to a review of the various interactions a business has with its consultants, employees, venture investors, banks and vendors. We end the course with an examination of the eventual merger/acquisition of the business. Practical problems and solutions are the focus of this course. It is intended to provide an important component of preparing students who will be advising and/or interacting with California businesses. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

California Civil Procedure (2) Law-7817 California Bar Tested
This course continues the study of civil procedure with advanced focus on California's procedural structure, including ways in which California procedure differs from federal civil practice. Areas of study include state practice in complex civil litigation, discovery, pleading, summary judgment, former adjudication and other advanced principles. Students will be expected to analyze complex fact patterns and to discern the ways in which California procedure differs from federal practice. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I and II.

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics: relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court. The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

California Motion Drafting & Procedure (2) Law-7648
This upper-level elective course provides a comprehensive overview of civil and criminal law and motion practice, addressing one of the most important and widely-used tools in a litigator’s arsenal. Enrolled students will receive practical training, drafting projects and a detailed understanding of the underlying law of various types of motions, including those relating to pleadings, discovery, sanctions, dismissal, summary judgment, joinder/bifurcation, settlement, continuance, mistake correction, evidence, damages, new trial and more. Moving beyond the theoretical law school framework, California Motion Drafting & Procedure presents the law in a real-world context, with techniques, research projects, and strategies that are typically encountered in summer associate programs and upon entering a firm or agency after graduation. The course will cover the following: 1) the legal basis and general strategic use of dozens of essential civil motions; 2) a thorough exploration of the procedural rules that govern the drafting and filing of motions in California courts; 3) real world drafting exercises and writing projects with professor feedback; and 4) a visit to a live law & motion hearing in Orange County Superior Court that will include a private follow-up Q&A with the hearing judge and motion research attorneys. The course focuses primarily on civil motions but also includes a comprehensive overview of essential criminal motions. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement OR Practice-Oriented Writing but not both.

Commercial Leasing (2) Law-7521
This course introduces students to one of the most important areas of real estate practice — commercial lease law and negotiation. Students are required to master elements of legal substance and theory concerning the leasing of commercial property, as well as methods of practice and negotiation. In addition to studying sophisticated commercial leases, case opinions and other textual materials, students draft and revise provisions of commercial leases, and ultimately, negotiate an entire lease transaction. Strongly recommended: successful completion of Real Estate Transactions and Finance. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate and the Business Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients. Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law. The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation. Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney. Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products, including a client letter, a memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: The Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement. Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor. If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement (one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time).

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested
California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well. This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction. Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Constitutional Law (4) Law-7126 California Bar Tested
This course covers the powers of the three branches of the federal government, the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, including the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States, and an introduction to issues involving equal protection.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for profit corporations. Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate. The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers. The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.

Directed Research (1-3; 12 ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings. To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing. The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required. The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester. Students cannot register for a Directed Research project online. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project. With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practice-Oriented writing requirement (one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time). Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements.

Entertainment Business and Legal Affairs (3) Law-7352
An overview of the primary areas of practice in which a lawyer and/or business affairs executive engage at a typical Hollywood studio throughout all phases of development, production, marketing and distribution of theatrical motion pictures. Emphasis will be placed on the business aspects in each of these areas and the economics of the various revenue streams exploited in such distribution. Deal structures will be taught for the customary transactions entered into for both “in-house” productions, films financed and/or produced by third parties but distributed by the studio (i.e. acquisitions, negative pick-ups, co-productions, split rights arrangements, etc.) and studio deals with financial partners to lay off economic risk. The course will conclude with an exercise in which the students will select a motion picture slate made up of various genres, cast and deal models they will select based upon the project elements of actual (but anonymous) Hollywood studio productions. The success of those slates will then be projected as revealed by the actual performance of the movies from which those elements were taken. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate and the Entertainment Law certificate.

Environmental Justice Seminar (2) Law-7540
Economic growth brings with it opportunities for growth and progress, but also creates a host of environmental risks. Much like economic benefits these environmental risks are not equally distributed. Incidentally, a number of reports have recorded that while economically disadvantaged population, among others, bear the brunt of environmental pollution, those who benefit from the very same activities are least impacted. Environmental justice is an effort to address and mitigate the disparate impact of environmental risks. This course is an introduction to environmental justice issues and legal responses in the United States and abroad. This course will focus on how Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, as well as other similar laws abroad have become the tools for addressing environmental justice problems. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE Certificate. This course will satisfy the Substantial Writing Requirement.

Estate and Gift Tax – JD (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including gift tax, estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax. Detailed coverage of tax treatment of property owned at death, property transferred during life, the marital and charitable deductions, impact on income tax basis and asset valuation issues. Coverage also includes avoidance of probate and the ethical considerations of estate planning. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Estate Planning - JD (2) Law-7837
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance. The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney, and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests. Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials. Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Federal Tax Research – JD (2) Law-7889
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. These specialized materials are often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores techniques in tax research and is also an extensive survey of primary and secondary sources in taxation. Classes focus on online research; there are several homework assignments and a short final paper. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is an approved elective for the Certificate in Taxation.

International Business Transactions (3) Law-7559
This introductory survey course studies the major issues in international business law. While the course will not focus heavily on international trade law, it will review the subject. In addition, the course will cover two other major forms of international business, namely foreign direct investment and the licensing of technology such as trademarks and patents. The course will also deal with the regulation of international business transactions, particularly with respect to corruption, human rights, the environment, and antitrust, as well as issues of particular interest in foreign business deals such as political risk, currency devaluation and acquiring insurance. Finally, the course will discuss the resolution of legal disputes in the international arena through litigation, arbitration and other means. Prerequisite: International Law and Organizations. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the International Law Certificate.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law. Note: this course is for international LL.M. students only.

International Law & Organizations (2) Law-7558
This is the introductory course in international law, covering the nature and sources of international law and its major developments. This course introduces students to the basic law of the international organizational system, including the United Nations (UN) and their specialized agencies. The course introduces concepts of international law and how they achieve legitimacy in the international system through UN organizations and conferences, the International Court of Justice, the International Law Commission, treaty bodies, and state practice. The law of foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine are considered along with the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues. Students will have the option to write a substantial paper to satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement in lieu of the final exam. This course counts for the International Law Emphasis Requirement and the required Public International Law Class for the Emphasis.

Land Use Regulation (3) Law-7626
This course examines the government regulation of land use and development. It is a course in applied constitutional, administrative and property law. The material covers land use planning, zoning, advanced and flexible zoning mechanisms, subdivision controls, constitutional and state law constraints on regulation, the economics and politics of land development, growth controls, the environmental regulation of land use and ecosystems, and alternatives to regulation. Students are exposed to business decision making, public problem solving, regulatory permitting and social science analyses. This is a core requirement for the ENLURE certificate. Students enrolled in this course for Spring 2015 must also enroll in the one-unit Land Use Regulation Practice Lab course.

Land Use Regulation Practice Lab (1) Law-7357
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to Professor Stahl's Land Use Regulation course. It is limited to students enrolled in Professor Stahl's course. The lab course will serve as a supplement to the main Land Use Regulation course. In particular, the lab course is a tool for providing students with the opportunity to learn practical writing and advocacy skills through document drafting and participation in mock planning commission meetings. Students will learn to draft documents relevant to a Land Use Regulation practice. Specific drafting assignments are left to the discretion of the lab professor, but examples may include letters to clients, applications for land use entitlements such as a variance, special use permit, or vesting subdivision map, memoranda of law regarding legal issues such as takings, equal protection, the Fair Housing Act, vested rights/nonconforming use, and so forth. Students may also prepare for and participate in a mock meeting of a planning commission, zoning board or city council. The course also provides an opportunity for students to receive extended amplified instruction on the doctrine from a practitioner. Such instruction, delivered through lecture or practice problems or role-playing, would help the students understand how the doctrine discussed in the main course shows up in day-to-day practice. The course will satisfy the Practical Legal Writing and/or Practical Skills Requirement.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504 California Bar Tested
This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery. The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems. Note: Any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them.

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination and in practice. Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters. Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation. In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study. Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class. Priority is given to students who are required to take this course.

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Municipal Ordinances (3) Law-7656
In this course, students will learn how to navigate, analyze and interpret county and city laws/ordinances. Students will have the opportunity to work with real city ordinances and will be provided with actual draft ordinances authored by municipal attorneys. Classes will consist of reviewing and in some instances revising draft ordinances to determine and/or address the potential impacts of the ordinance on property owners, neighborhood associations, business groups and other stakeholders. Students will be exposed to a wide range of municipal issues ranging from backyard chicken keeping to the regulation and control of big box retail stores and cell towers. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Music Law (3) Law-7853
This course will explore the legal and business aspects of the music business through an examination of the key agreements in an artist's career: recording, music publishing, touring, merchandising, management and other important areas. Recent case law and emerging business models will be examined from the perspective of the artist and the parties with whom they do business. Prerequisite: Entertainment Law, or Copyright, or with Professor's permission. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors. The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined. Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. This course may satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement (one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time). This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Students will practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations. Students will learn about different approaches and theories of negotiation, develop their skills, understand their negotiating preferences and those of others as well as deal with ethical issues. Students will do simulated negotiations involving transactions, dispute resolution and other situations lawyers may encounter in practice. In addition to written preparation for the negotiations, students may draft agreements and will be asked to reflect and write about their learning and work. This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Patent Law and Practice (3) Law-7815
This course offers an in-depth exploration of patent law. The course covers standards for patentability, the patent application process, claim construction, infringement, defenses to infringement, and remedies for patent infringement. The course also includes discussion and practical exercises related to the practice of patent law. We will also touch upon the distinction between patent law and the law of trade secrets. Students are not required to have a technical background to take this course. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Practice Foundation Transactions (3) Law-7657
This course will introduce students to transactional law practice by exploring the role of lawyers in executing business-related transactions. Students will acquire a foundation for practice by participating in exercises and simulated transactions that lawyers handle in practice. Students will practice communicating with and advising clients, drafting documents, dealing with other attorneys and handling transactions. Students will learn how transactional lawyers add value and solve problems for clients by identifying client objectives, understanding the business context of the matter, spotting legal and business issues, evaluating options and closing a deal. Students will receive feedback about their progress and work. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement. Note: This course may become a required course in future years, and if that occurs, then it will not apply towards the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Practice Foundation — Criminal Litigation (3) Law-7665
This course exposes students to the mechanics of criminal litigation. It will study the stages in the criminal process from charging through sentencing. There will also be instruction in advanced legal writing techniques and students will produce written briefs of the type frequently filed in trial courts in criminal litigation. The course will give heavy emphasis to California practice and procedure, although there will be some consideration of competing approaches taken in other jurisdictions. Learning will proceed primarily through simulated exercises in which students will act as lawyers litigating the various stages of a criminal case. Grading will be based on performance in the simulated exercises as well as several written exercises. Students must take Criminal Procedure — Police Practices before they may take this course, which replaces Criminal Procedure — Adjudicative Process. This course is strongly recommended for students interested in practicing criminal law. Students in this course need not have taken Evidence or Trial Practice. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Pre-Trial Civil Practice (3) Law-7596
This course centers on practical exercises in the preparation of litigation documents. Exercises may include the preparation of a complaint, cross-claim or counter-claim, answer, discovery documents, pre-trial and post-trial motions, and trial briefs. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)
This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings. Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Psychology of Conflict Resolution (3) Law-7333
Lawyers and their clients often get caught up with negative emotions, such as anger and fear, that undermine their ability to engage in effective problem-solving. This course offers a powerful framework to help students develop an understanding of the emotional and psychological dynamics of conflict and to learn inter-personal skills that will help them work through conflict constructively. There are both intra-personal and inter-personal components to the course. This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of their own emotions, judgments and biases, and of how their unconscious “default” communication styles create and exacerbate conflict. The course also offers prescriptive strategies for working through emotionally charged situations with others. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with course techniques through in-class and out-of-class exercises. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, students must be open and willing to examine their own behavior and motivations, and to experiment with new ways of communicating with others. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. Note: You must attend the first class meeting or you will automatically be dropped from the course. You should also attend the first class meeting if you are on the waitlist and intend to add the course if a seat becomes available for you. If you are on the waitlist and are not able to attend the first class meeting, you may keep your name on the waitlist by emailing the professor and letting him/her know that you would like to add the class if a seat becomes available.

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing Plans – JD (2) Law-7882
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP), stock bonus plans — their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Recommended: Advanced Federal Income Taxation.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of damages, restitution and equitable remedies.

Securities Regulation (3) Law-7606
This course covers the federal regulation of the distribution and sale of stocks and other securities as a means of financing business operations. Students will closely examine the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course will explore such topics as the definition and nature of securities; the registration and sale of securities to investors; exemptions from registration for public and private offerings; the philosophy of mandatory disclosure rules; the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission; the role of underwriters; civil and criminal liability of corporate issuers, directors, and officers for fraud and manipulation of securities markets; the regulation of brokers and dealers; and the unique professional responsibilities of attorneys who practice in the securities field. It is recommended that students successfully complete Corporations prior to this course. For Spring 2015, students who enroll in this course must also enroll in the one unit Securities Regulation Practice Lab course (please see course description for Lab). This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Securities Regulation Practice Lab (1) Law-7356
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to the Securities Regulation doctrinal course (Law 7606). Students must simultaneously be enrolled in both this lab course and in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course. Only students who are enrolled in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course may enroll in this lab course. This is a practical, hands-on course covering the documents and strategic drafting concerns related to federal and state securities regulation. Tracking the topics covered in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course, the lab course introduces students to the process of investigating, analyzing and drafting documents compliant with selected federal and state statutes, rules and regulations governing the offer and sale of securities within the United States. Students will learn to review and draft relevant portions of periodic reports required by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, offering documents for public or private securities offerings, and memoranda intended to provide appropriate written legal advice on questions of securities law. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636 California Bar Tested
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies. Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing and writing essay questions based on California law. This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time. Note: Any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. Enrollment is limited to 3L and 4L law students.

Sports Law II (3) Law-7868
This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop the practical legal skills required of the sports law practitioner. Students will work with practicing sports attorneys to analyze and develop the specific skills necessary for the practitioner in the Sports Law field, including, the representation of professional and amateur athletes, the collective bargaining process, and issues involving teams and organizations. Students will be required to participate in and perform exercises focusing on these topics, as well as attend events outside of class. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate.

Taxation of Business Organizations - JD (3) Law-7608
Problems in the taxation of subchapter K partnerships, subchapter C corporations, and subchapter S corporations are covered by this course. Topics pertaining to partnership taxation include the formation, operation, and termination of general and limited partnerships. Class discussion is held concerning the definition of the partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership as an association. Topics pertaining to corporate taxation include tax treatment of a corporation and a corporate shareholder with respect to corporate formation; organization and property transfers, dividends and distributed income; accumulated earnings and undistributed income; non-liquidating corporate distributions; collapsible corporations; personal holding companies; and sale or liquidation of a corporation. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. This course is also a prerequisite for JD students who wish to enroll in Corporate Stock & Asset Acquisitions and Dispositions.

Toxic and Mass Tort Law (3) Law-7611
Our technological society has spawned an explosion of toxic tort actions. Topics include special statute of limitations problems in toxic cases, the complexities of mass litigation and problems of proof in toxic tort actions. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate. This course may satisfy the Substantial Writing Requirement with faculty approval.

Trademarks and Unfair Competition (3)
This advanced course in intellectual property covers topics related to trademarks and unfair competition. The course will address the economic and policy aspects of trademark and unfair competition law, including related areas of advertising, branding and consumer protection law, and their adaptation to the internet age. We will discuss fundamental concepts like distinctiveness, priority, ownership, likelihood of confusion, false designation of origin, and dilution, and look at the interplay of state and federal law, as well as the international treaty system. Students will be exposed to best practices for trademark selection, registration and licensing, and lodging and defending against trademark infringement claims. During the course of the semester, students will be expected to undertake and complete several practical assignments that together will apply toward satisfying the course’s writing requirements (which is in lieu of a final exam). These may include: conducting an initial trademark clearance search, preparing an opinion letter on the availability of a service mark for a new business, filing a (mock) intent to use registration, preparing a cease and desist letter, drafting a brief to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, and providing a client advisory on a recent case of interest. In addition to casebook assignments, students will be responsible for monitoring and analyzing trademark and unfair competition disputes in the news and presenting in class. This course will meet the Law School’s Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination. Prerequisite: successful completion of Evidence. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution certificate. Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - Must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course. Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the waitlist, and your name will be added to the end of the waitlist.

U.S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7880
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network. Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, the branch profits tax, and the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions. The course will also cover the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, including the U.S. taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad, the effect of U.S. tax treaties, and the foreign tax credit mechanism. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Video Game Law (2) Law-7358
This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the business and legal issues related to video game development, publishing and distribution. The course begins by breaking down a successful modern video game into its components. Students then study the following as they pertain to video games: inbound content licensing (movies, books, games), employment and work-for-hire agreements, music licensing, talent issues and agreements, technology licensing, guild issues, development and publishing agreements, content clearance, user-created content, marketing issues, censorship and ratings boards, agreements with users/purchasers, international issues, virtual property, eSports and more. While the course includes some important case law and analysis of essential aspects of intellectual property and other law that impact developers and publishers, much of the class will focus on the transactions and contracts students should expect to encounter when counseling a client in the video game industry. Prerequisites: One of the following courses: Copyright Law; Entertainment Law; Intellectual Property; or Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Water Law (2) Law-7620
This course examines legal controls on a scarce natural resource that is essential to human life, our natural environment and economic development. Topics include California’s unique methods of allocating and distributing water; water suppliers and regulatory agencies; prior appropriation doctrine; riparian water rights; groundwater; federal and Indian reserved water rights; environmental controls; the relationship between water and economic development; and the role of the community and interested groups in water policy. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE emphasis certificate.

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested
This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts and trust administration. Students enrolled in Professor McConville’s section for Spring 2015 must also enroll in the one unit Wills and Trusts Practice Lab course.

Wills and Trusts Practice Lab (1) Law-7355
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to Professor McConville's Wills and Trusts Course. It is limited to students enrolled in Professor McConville's course. This course is intended to give students an opportunity to learn some of the “real life” skills involved with running a wills and trusts practice. The class will emphasize communication and writing skills. As needed, the class will provide information that will supplement and reinforce the material in the main Wills and Trusts class. Topics will center on the key elements of practicing as a wills and trusts attorney. Students will be required to perform several oral and written assignments throughout the semester, some or all of which might be completed in groups of two or more. Certain projects will require class participation. Specific drafting assignments may include letters to clients and beneficiaries; memoranda to the file memorializing discussions with the client or other issues that arise in the course of representation; portions of briefs; wills or will provisions; trusts or trust provisions; powers of appointment; and powers of attorney. This course satisfies the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654)
Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7589), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654). Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing and practical lawyering skills. For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN (http://lawschool.westlaw.com/manage/homepage.asp?courseid=33468).

Externships can be taken for three, four or five units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units. (Law firm externships can be taken for one or two units, only).

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships. Students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least two weeks before the start of the semester. Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above). If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within one week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements. The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times. Externships of at least three units will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time).

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by Fowler Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Scholarly Writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members receive one graded unit of academic credit in the second semester that they have served on the staff; and, thereafter, 2) editors may each receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school. In addition, each Staff Editor [2L's] enroll in Directed Research during the semester that they are writing a student note for up to three units.

Nexus Journal Law-7867
Nexus is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students. The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester. This course may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement or the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement with faculty approval.

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education. Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment and professionalism. Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiations, Mediation and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional level of competition, or three units for trial and appellate competitions outside the law school. This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum. Only Moot Court Competitions may satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.


Clinical Courses

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court. Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement (one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time).


The Alona Cortese Elder Law Center

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults. The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly. In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings. The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice. Enrollment is limited to 14 students. Prerequisites: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure II; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.


Entertainment Law Clinic

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers. Students conduct client interviews with directors and producers who are about to begin production on feature length films. Students prepare documents and contracts for one to six films each semester, including forming an LLC; acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases. Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement (one course cannot satisfy both requirements). This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.


Bette and Wylie Aitken Family Violence Clinic

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students. Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families. Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. The clinic operates out of the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school. The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills. In addition to work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision. There are no pre or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

You may register for this course online. However, enrollment is contingent upon completion of an application process. Applications are due by December 14, 2014. The application is available on the Registrar’s website under “Forms.” Please make sure you complete the application and timely email it to Professor Marzouk at marzouk@chapman.edu. You may also return it to the desk of Administrative Assistant Maria Sanchez, on the fourth floor of the law school. Enrollment in the course cannot be finalized until the application is submitted and approved. Note: The FVC-Immigration class meets on Tuesdays from 1:15 to 2:30 p.m. There is a required orientation held at the OCFJC on Friday, January 16, 2015, from 1:15 to 4 p.m. Please notify Professor Marzouk prior to registering of any potential scheduling conflict during orientation. Please note that the FVC is a restricted withdrawal course. The last day to add/drop for Spring 2015 is January 14, 2015.

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655
The Family Violence Clinic – Protection Order Section (FVC-PO) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level JD and LL.M. students. The course meets on Tuesdays from 1:15 to 3 p.m. through most of the semester. Orientation will be held on Friday, January 16 and Friday, January 23, 2015 from 1:15 to 4 p.m. Students who have a class conflict with these Friday sessions should notify Professor Seiden before classes begin. Students in the FVC-PO section have primary responsibility to represent victims of family violence either in Family Court or in written petitions for protection orders. After the initial two week orientation period, students receive hands-on training in interviewing clients and participate in five weeks of “trial boot camp,” in which they conduct simulated opening statements, direct and cross examination, entering of trial exhibits, and closing arguments. Following this training, students represent victims of family violence in Orange County Superior Court protection order hearings or in filing petitions for protection orders. During most of the semester, students meet in pairs for one hour each week, in addition to seminar, with their supervising professor. The clinic operates out of the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school, in Anaheim. The seminar, team meetings, simulations and moots take place at the law school. FVC-PO students wishing to represent clients in court must be enrolled in or have passed Evidence. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Students may enroll in this course online; however, enrollment is contingent upon approval of a student application, which can be found on the Family Violence Clinic web page or on the Registrar’s web page under “Forms.” Applications should be submitted by email to Professor Seiden prior to the registration period and in any event, as soon after registration as possible. Please note that the FVC is a restricted withdrawal course. The last day to add/drop is January 14, 2015.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic - Immigration (1-3) Law-7629
The Advanced Family Violence Clinic (FVC) Immigration course is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic faculty. Professor Marzouk will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced FVC student prior to registration. The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned).

Advanced FVC Immigration students represent survivors of family violence in immigration relief before United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Executive Office of Immigration Review, or the Board of Immigration Appeals. Advanced FVC Immigration Students may be involved in community outreach projects and limited scope representations clinics. In addition to casework at the OCFJC, Advanced FVC students will meet weekly with clinic faculty for case supervision. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic – Protection Orders (1-3) Law-7669
The Protection Order section of the Advanced Family Violence Clinic is a semester-long graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic — with prior approval from Professor Seiden. The credit allocation will be determined prior to registration and will reflect the amount and complexity of work to be completed by the student. Advanced FVC-PO students take part in community legal education and provide legal advice and limited scope representation to victims of family violence. Advanced FVC-PO students may also represent victims of family violence in Family Court hearings and generally provide support and assistance to FVC-PO students. In addition to casework performed at the Clinic, located in Anaheim at the OCFJC, students meet weekly with clinic faculty, taking part in a seminar component as well as videotaped simulation exercises. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.


Mediation Clinic

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation. Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience. Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others. There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic. Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators. While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases. The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace. The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers. The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning. Students will be graded on full participation in the Mediation Clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic for Juveniles (2) Law-7354
The Juvenile Hall Mediation Program provides significant benefits for juveniles in the correctional system. Under the supervision of the clinic director, students mediate conflicts between the minors in Riverside County Juvenile Hall. Students also teach peer mediation skills to juveniles specially selected to work with the program. In the long term, this will teach the residents the skills necessary to prevent and solve conflict before causing larger issues. Since many youths in juvenile hall have not been exposed to conflict resolution devices, this program provides a unique and critical tool to assist these at-risk individuals. The clinic meets on Tuesdays from 6 to 7:40 p.m. Students go to Juvenile Hall in Riverside on Thursdays from 3 to 4:30 p.m. to work with the minors. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Tax Clinic

Appellate Tax Clinic (1-2) Law-7642
This course offers the opportunity for students to participate in actual appellate tax cases conducted under the auspices of The Center for Fair Administration of Taxation. Students enrolled in the course may participate as amicus curiae in significant matters of federal, state or local tax law. Students conduct research on legal issues, draft appellate briefs, and depending on the jurisdiction of the court and the nature of the case, present their brief before an appellate court. Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax, Civil Procedure, top 40% class rank and permission of professor. Students should submit a resume in advance. Enrollment limited to clinic current case-load (typically two to four students.) Registration allowed only with prior approval. May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval (one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time).

United States Tax Court Clinic (3) Law-7890
Under a special IRS and Tax Court rules of practice, students in this clinical education course are permitted to handle actual cases on a wide variety of tax issues at various stages of exam, appeal, court and collections. Under supervision of Attorney-Professors, students are responsible for all aspects of their cases including meeting with clients, gathering facts and evidence, researching applicable laws, and meeting with the IRS to discuss case in an effort to negotiate a favorable outcome. If the case is for trial, the student normally represents the client in court and completes all post trial work. This course is an elective option for the Certificate in Taxation. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

+-Spring 2015 (LL.M.)

Advanced Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) LL.M. TAP course Law-7351
(Pat Ahle, Former Prosecutor at Anaheim City Attorney’s Office)
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance; bail, prosecutorial discretion; grand jury proceedings; preliminary hearings; joinder and severance of offenses and defendants; right to speedy trial; guilty pleas; discovery; trial by jury; publicity; double jeopardy; and post-conviction remedies and in depth analysis of numerous actual criminal trials.

Corporate Tax II (2) Law-7623
The federal income tax consequences of taxable and tax-free stock and asset acquisitions and dispositions, including reorganizations, consolidations and corporate divisions; the carryover and survival of net operating losses and other corporate attributes; and the acquisition of loss corporations. Prerequisite: Corporate Tax I.

Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Law-7834
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including gift tax, estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax. Detailed coverage of tax treatment of property owned at death, property transferred during life, the marital and charitable deductions, impact on income tax basis and asset valuation issues. Coverage also includes avoidance of probate and the ethical considerations of estate planning. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Estate Planning (2) Law-7838
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance. The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests. Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Ethics in Tax Practice (2) Law-7887
An examination of the statutory, regulatory and ethical standards governing those who practice in the tax field, including the application of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to tax practice, Circular 230 (governing those admitted to practice before the Internal Revenue Service), and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and the Treasury Regulations governing return preparers, with lesser attention to provisions governing CPAs and other federal statutes, such as the federal conflict of interest statute. Among the areas covered are advertising and solicitation, return preparation and advice, dealing with the Internal Revenue Service in the audit and appeals process, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and uncooperative clients.

Federal Tax Research (2) Law-7888
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. These specialized materials are often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores techniques in tax research and is also an extensive survey of primary and secondary sources in taxation. Classes focus on online research; there are several homework assignments and a short final paper. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is an elective for the Certificate in Taxation.

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing Plans – LL.M. (2) Law-7883
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP) and stock bonus plans and their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions. Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

U.S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7881
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network. Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, the branch profits tax, and the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions. The course will also cover the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, including the U.S. taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad, the effect of U.S. tax treaties, and the foreign tax credit mechanism. Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

+-Fall 2014

Administrative Law & Practice (3) Law-7503
This course provides a study of the processes of decision making by administrative agencies and their control by legislators and courts. It centers on the tension between the need for delegation of power to agencies sufficient to ensure effective government, and the need to limit that power and protect the citizen from government oppression. The course focuses particularly on administrative procedure (including notice and comment rulemaking) and deals with the concept of administrative discretion and the constitutional, statutory, and common law doctrines that control discretion in administrative decision making. Also considered are contemporary issues that bear upon the fairness of governmental action (e.g., the right to notice and hearing, confrontation of witnesses, ex parte communications, institutional decisions, and combination of functions). There will not be an exam. Students will be graded on a series of short practice-oriented writing assignments designed to replicate practice in administrative law. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic - Immigration (1-3) Law-7629
The Advanced Family Violence Clinic Immigration course is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic faculty. Professor Marzouk will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced Family Violence Clinic student prior to registration. The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned).

Advanced Family Violence Clinic Immigration students represent survivors of family violence in immigration relief before United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Executive Office of Immigration Review, or the Board of Immigration Appeals. Advanced FVC Immigration Students may be involved in community outreach projects and limited scope representations clinics. In addition to casework at the OCFJC, Advanced Family Violence Clinic students will either meet bi-weekly with clinic faculty on an individual basis for case supervision or weekly with other advanced students and their supervisor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic – Protective Orders (1-3) Law-7669
Description pending.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803
This course will focus on the resources, process, and strategy of legal research. The course will include instruction on primary law such as legislative and administrative documents, and secondary sources, including practice materials. Students will be required to complete several research assignments to demonstrate competence using print and online resources to research and analyze legal issues. There is no final exam. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Mediation Clinic (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation. Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience. Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others. There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic. Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Advanced Mediation for Juveniles (2) Law-7354
The Juvenile Hall Mediation Program provides significant benefits for juveniles in the correctional system. Under the supervision of the clinic director, students mediate conflicts between the minors in Riverside County Juvenile Hall. Students also teach peer mediation skills to juveniles specially selected to work with the program. In the long term, this will teach the residents the skills necessary to prevent and solve conflict before causing larger issues. Since many youths in juvenile hall have not been exposed to conflict resolution devices, this program provides a unique and critical tool to assist these at-risk individuals. The clinic meets on Tuesdays from 6:00 p.m. to 7:40 p.m. Students go to Juvenile Hall in Riverside on Thursdays from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. to work with the minors. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Advanced Topic: Litigating California Regulations (3) Law-7662
From theory to “nuts & bolts,” this course covers how state and local entities promulgate regulations, the constitutional and statutory authority for those regulations; challenging and defending the regulations; and the process of litigating regulatory violations and appealing administrative decisions in California courts. During the course, students will apply what they have learned by crafting the necessary substantive pleadings to challenge or defend an administrative decision.

Arbitration (3) Law-7659
This course gives students an orientation to how arbitration works and practice in basic arbitration advocacy skills. The course will involve comprehensive study of rules and code sections as well as exposure to various arbitration providers and practical information about conducting arbitration hearings. Topics include discovery in an arbitration forum, admitting evidence, opening statements, direct and cross-examination, and closing arguments. The central philosophy of the class is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. This course is designed to enhance and improve writing, presentation, and public speaking skills. For maximum benefit of the course materials it is suggested that all students have previously completed Evidence. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part I (3) Law-7518
This course will explore adjustment of the debtor/creditor relationship through the federal bankruptcy laws, beginning with background discussion on the history and purpose of insolvency laws and continuing with the sources of both secured and unsecured creditor claims. The course will cover security interests, attachment and judgment liens, filing of the bankruptcy petition and schedules, the automatic stay, and creation of the estate and discharge. Chapter 7 liquidation and Chapter 13 wage earner plans will both be explored in depth. Other subjects explored will be relief of stay, dischargeability litigation and the avoiding powers of the trustee.

Business Associations (4) Law-7146 California Bar Tested
This course offers coverage of both fundamental agency law principles and an in-depth study of the law governing various business forms/entities, including sole proprietorships, general partnerships, corporations, limited partnerships, limited liability companies, and limited liability partnerships. In addition to addressing basic questions of formation, students will acquire an understanding of the law governing various aspects of business operations and growth, the means by which investors and other stakeholders may legitimately obtain a return on their investment, the extent of personal stakeholder liability with respect to business obligations, and other topics of relevance. Coverage of various business entities in the context of a single course offers students the opportunity, via comparison and contrast, to appreciate the unique legal character of specific business forms. This knowledge will enhance their ability to advise clients with respect to which business entity best achieves their clients’ overall business objectives. The course also serves to prepare students for advanced study in arenas in which prior knowledge of various business entity fundamentals is assumed. Students who have completed the course in Corporations may not enroll in this course.

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics: relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court. The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

Civil Rights Law (3) Law-7519
This course will study the laws and constitutional provisions that protect civil rights, particularly the right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, sex, national origin, age, disability, and other protected characteristics. This course will give some consideration to legal actions that seek redress for violations of other federal constitutional or statutory rights. The course will focus on techniques for constructing or defending against such actions. This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Comparative Law (3) Law-7524
This course, through readings and class discussion, documentaries and guest speakers, introduces the American law student to the rich legal traditions around the world. We begin by examining English law, the legal system most comparable to our own and which forms the basis of Anglo-American law. We then move to the European Continent and civil law by studying law in Germany. The course then examines two non-Western legal traditions: Chinese law and Islamic Law. The tremendous growth of the Chinese economy and the growing political importance of China in the 21st century is the motivation for examining Chinese law. We end the course with an examination of Islamic Law, a religious-based legal tradition. This course will probably be only course a student takes in law school that examines law outside of the United States. It provides an important component of preparing the future lawyer to practice in a globalized legal world.

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court. Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. It is preferred that students take this Clinic as a 3 credit course. However, lower credits of 1 – 2 may be taken with professor approval.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients. Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law. The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation. Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney. Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products, including a client letter, a memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: the Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement. Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor. If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested
California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states, and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well. This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction. Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Constitutional Law (4) Law-7126 California Bar Tested
This course covers the powers of the three branches of the federal government, the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, including the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States, and an introduction to issues involving equal protection.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for profit corporations. Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate. The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers. The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included. Students who have completed the course in Business Associations may not enroll in this course.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.

Directed Research (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings. To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing. The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required. The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester. Students cannot register for a Directed Research project online. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project. With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practical Writing requirement. One course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements. Students may not make changes to the number of credits post the Add/Drop deadline for the semester.

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults. The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly. In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings. The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice. Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. Enrollment is limited to 14 students.

Employment Law (2) Law-7536
This course explores selected topics in employment law in the non-union workplace. The course covers the evolving common law and statutory approaches to regulating the employer-employee relationship from hiring to firing. Topics include employee privacy, protections against workplace discrimination, regulation of wages and hours, sexual harassment, and remedies for wrongful termination.

Employment Law Lab (1) Law-7660
Description pending.

Entertainment Law (3) Law-7538
This course explores legal issues connected with the development, production, and exploitation of entertainment product, focusing predominantly on filmed entertainment and news media, to some extent on musical compositions and recordings, and incidentally on other forms of entertainment. Topics include life story and personality rights (defamation, invasion of privacy, etc.); celebrity publicity rights; profit participations; collective bargaining agreements and artistic credits; non-copyright protection of ideas; contract formation and duration; ethics and regulation of talent representatives such as agents, lawyers, and managers; and selected copyright and trademark issues. Copyright is not a prerequisite, and this class should not be considered as a replacement for the copyright course. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Entertainment Law.

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers. Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films. Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC; acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases. Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Environmental Law (3) Law-7541
This course constitutes an analysis of the ends and means of environmental protection through study of statutes, administrative regulations and practices, and judicial decisions treating the protection of the environment in the United States. Topics may include statutes that regulate pollution emissions (e.g., Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act); procedural requirements (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act, California Environmental Quality Act); administrative law (e.g., standing, standards of judicial review); hazardous and toxic substances and wastes; risk assessment and management; natural resources and wildlife conservation; enforcement and liability; and environmental justice. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law. The grade in this course is based on a paper. Note: for the course paper to apply towards the Scholarly Writing requirement, students must meet the minimum grade requirement set by the professor.

Estate and Gift Taxation – JD (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials. Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Evidence section with Professor Mainero – this section covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects.

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654) variable credits course
Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7589), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654). Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills. For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN.

Externships can be taken for 3, 4, or 5 units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units. (Law firm externships can be taken for 1 or 2 units, only).

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 2 weeks before the start of the semester. Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above). If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within 1 week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements. The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times. Externships of at least 3 units will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Family Law (2) Law-7542
This course is a study of the extent to which the state may and does regulate family relationships. The instructor may select topics from among the following: informal and nontraditional familial relationships; control of reproduction and current reproductive technology; antenuptial and separation agreements; legitimacy, adoption, and termination of parental rights; divorce, child custody, support, and paternity proceedings; and the role of the lawyer as counselor.

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students. Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families. Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by US Citizenship and Immigration Services. The clinic operates out of the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim. The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills. In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision. There are no pre- or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

You may register for this course online. However, enrollment is contingent upon completion of an application process. Applications are due by July 11, 2014. The application is available on the Registrar’s website under “Forms.” Please make sure you complete the application and timely email it to Professor Marzouk at marzouk@chapman.edu. You may also return it to the desk of Administrative Assistant Maria Sanchez, on the fourth floor of the law school. Enrollment in the course cannot be finalized until the application is submitted and approved.
Note: FVC class meets on Tuesdays from 1:15 to 2:30. There is a required orientation held at the Orange County Family Justice Center on Friday, August 22nd, from 1:15 to 4:00 pm. Please notify Professor Marzouk prior to registering of any potential scheduling conflict during orientation. Please note that the FVC is a restricted withdrawal course. The last day to add/drop for Fall 2014 is August 20, 2014.

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students. Under faculty supervision, FVC-Protection Order students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence in court on applications for protective orders in Orange County Superior Court, Family Division. FVC students also advise pro per applicants for restraining orders before they appear in court on their own for domestic violence hearings. The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim. The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, direct and cross examination, entering exhibits in court, and related trial skills. In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two or three for case supervision. FVC-Protection Order students must be enrolled in or have taken Evidence. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Federal Courts/Jurisdiction (3) Law-7543
This course examines the scope of the federal judicial power and the role of the federal judiciary in our constitutional system. It considers the relationship of the federal courts to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and the relationship of the federal courts to the state courts. As such, class discussion naturally focuses on separation of powers and federalism principles. Topics may include Supreme Court jurisdiction, congressional control of federal court jurisdiction, justiciability, non-Article III courts, state sovereign immunity, federal court abstention, section 1983, federal review of state court decisions, and federal habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Financial Accounting (3) Law-7855
This course represents an introduction to accounting for students with little background in the field. Initial emphasis is on established accounting principles and the analysis of financial statements. The course’s perspective is that of a business attorney who might use financial statements to advise clients in various legal settings (e.g., the drafting of financial contracts and the valuation of businesses). Applications to securities law are also considered. This course is a requirement for the Business Law Emphasis program, unless a student has already taken accounting.

First Amendment Law Seminar (3) Law-7325
This course is a study of the fundamental freedoms of speech, press, association, and religion. In addition to considering the historical background, the course focuses on specific challenges in First Amendment jurisprudence, including regulation of speech in a public forum, access to the media, regulation of the press, symbolic expression, libel, obscenity, commercial speech, picketing, right of association, loyalty oaths, legislative investigations and government demands for information, separation of church and state, free exercise of religion, state aid to religious schools, and regulation of religion-based conduct. In addition, the course will provide instruction in advanced legal writing, with the objective of producing an appellate brief will take the place of a traditional final examination, and that will provide a high-quality writing sample as well. This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.

Fundamentals of In-House Corporate Practice (2) Law-7854
This is a practical skills course in practicing as an In-House Corporate Lawyer that introduces students to the fundamentals of working effectively in a high-functioning corporate law department and prepares them for a career as an In-House Corporate Counsel. The course will cover the structure and mechanics of corporate legal departments; leadership, effective communications and the exercise of legal ethics within a commercial organization; the use of business tools and technology; and the in-house approach to managing Intellectual property, labor & employment, significant litigation, regulatory compliance, corporate governance, international operations, outside counsel, contract negotiation and administration, and organizational crisis response. Students will have the opportunity to perform exercises relating to each of the substantive areas of in-house practice through actual case studies of corporate legal issues, simulating actual assignments as corporate counsel. Outside reading consists of articles and excerpts of published materials. Class sessions consist of lecture, class discussion, practical exercises and presentations, with some prominent in-house lawyers and general counsel as guest speakers, and networking opportunities. The final exam will consist of a write-up on a case study to be assigned on the last day of class and submitted prior to the end of the exam period. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate. For students in the Class of 2016 and after this course is a core requirement for the Business Law Emphasis Certificate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Immigration Law (2) Law-7552
This course provides an introduction into the examination of US law (constitutional, statutory, and administrative) governing the entry, presence, and expulsion of foreign nationals (aliens). Topics include: sources of federal immigration power, immigrant and non-immigrant categories, exclusion, admission, deportability, refugees, and unauthorized migrants.

Immigration Law Lab (1) Law-7664
Description pending.

Income Taxation of Trusts, Estates, and Beneficiaries J.D. (2) Law-7899
The federal income taxation of trusts, estates and beneficiaries, including the determination of taxable income and tax liability, distributable net income, distribution, income in respect of a decedent and other income tax issues resulting from the death of a decedent, grantor trusts, foreign trusts and charitable trusts. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Intellectual Property (3) Law-7555
This course surveys the primary types of intellectual property under federal and state law. It emphasizes trademarks, copyrights, and patents while also addressing unfair competition, rights of publicity, trade secrets, and protection of designs. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property. This course is a core requirement for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

International Business Litigation (2) Law-7510
This course deals with the litigation process in the United States when the subject of the litigation involves a transnational business transaction. We will examine the following topics: U.S. jurisdiction and other aspects of forum selection and forum non conveniens; service of process of a U.S. lawsuit abroad; international discovery; sovereign immunity; act of state; and enforcement of foreign judgments in American courts. Emphasis will be on acquiring practical skills in both prosecuting and defending international business litigation suits. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the Entertainment Law Certificate. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement.

International Business Transactions (3) Law-7559
This introductory survey course studies the major issues in international business law. While the course will not focus heavily on international trade law, it will review the subject. In addition, the course will cover two other major forms of international business, namely foreign direct investment and the licensing of technology such as trademarks and patents. The course will also deal with the regulation of international business transactions, particularly with respect to corruption, human rights, the environment, and antitrust, as well as issues of particular interest in foreign business deals such as political risk, currency devaluation, and acquiring insurance. Finally, the course will discuss the resolution of legal disputes in the international arena through litigation, arbitration, and other means. Prerequisite: International Law and Organizations. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the Entertainment Law Certificate.

International Environmental Law: Markets and Regulatory Approaches Seminar (3) Law-7872
Description pending.

Land Use Dispute Practice Seminar (3) Law-7311
This course is designed to expose students to a variety of land use, zoning, and planning issues. In particular, students will review and analyze a variety of conflicts between and amongst property owners, local governments, and utiltiies relative to how land is used and/or developed. Students will be provided with transcripts of hearings and appellate briefs to see how actual land use disputes are argued and decided by the courts. Grading through attendance and a final paper. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE Certificate.

Law and Practice of the Hollywood Guilds (3) Law-7634
This course deals with laws and practices related to the most visible unions in the entertainment industry, the powerful and pervasive so-called “Hollywood Guilds.” These are: the Writers Guild of America (WGA), the Directors of Guild of America (DGA) and the newly merged Screen Actors Guild -- American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA). Students will learn of the history of English and American labor law and consider how the US federal labor, copyright and antitrust laws frame the context today in which these unions represent the key creative elements in the making of film, television and emerging new media. A wide variety of legal issues and practices related to managing the creation, production and distribution of intellectual property and the division of the income it generates will be examined. Students will be introduced to the structure and operation of the guilds' collective bargaining agreements covering the employment of screenwriters, directors and actors/performers, as well as the guilds' regulation of agents. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Law, Lawyers, and the Legal System in Film (3) Law-7546
The class focuses on film portrayals of law, lawyers, and the legal system as a means of exploring questions of public policy, jurisprudence, professional responsibility, and even personal philosophy and psychology – all through the lens of filmic storytelling and filmmaking technique. Topics to be discussed include the adversary system, ethical dilemmas, various lawyer-character archetypes, the jury system, the role of judges, the tension between popular notions of justice and certain legal regimes, and the strengths and limits of the legal system as a means of resolving disputes and providing remedies. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Law of Direct Democracy (3) Law-7661
In 24 states, the ballot initiative is available at the state government level. More than two-thirds of U.S. citizens live in a city or a state (or both) that permits the people to enact laws through the initiative process. Nearly every citizen lives in a state that permits the use of some form of direct democracy—recall of elected officials, the referendum or the ballot initiative. Although the ballot initiative is not available to propose new federal laws, the ballot initiative is driving the political conversation at a national level. Immigration reform, same-sex marriage, medical marijuana, term limits, tax limitations, state debt and borrowing limitations, abortion, affirmative action and school funding are just a few of the topics of ballot initiatives in the last two decades that have become part of the national debate. This course uses state and federal judicial opinions, the text of ballot initiatives, statutes and constitutional provisions to compare and contrast the various state laws that govern the use of direct democracy in the United States. This course also contemplates the role of interest groups, voters, courts and elected officials and examines their ability to utilize, influence and limit the initiative process.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504 California Bar Tested
This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, and declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery. The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems. Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year. Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them.

Legal Drafting (2) Law-7573
This course develops the student’s legal writing skills in a variety of areas not covered in a traditional first year legal research and writing course. The student learns to draft wills, contracts, pleadings, discovery plans, discovery, closing arguments to a jury, legislation, client letters, demand letters, settlement proposals, tactical memoranda, and more. This course may satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters. Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation. In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study. Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class. Priority is given to students who are required to take this course.

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course is an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators. While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases. The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace. The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers. The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning. Students will be graded on full participation in the mediation clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mergers and Acquisitions (3) Law-7580
This is an in-depth review of the process, players, documentation, laws, rules and regulations governing the purchase, sale and combination of business entities. Particular attention will be paid to the practical implications of certain acquisition strategies and the legal interpretation/implications of key document provisions. Students will become familiar with the mergers and acquisitions process from initial feasibility analysis through closing of the transaction, as well as post-closing implications of certain strategic decisions by key players. Upon completion of the course, students will have a basic familiarity with the steps required to conduct a business acquisition and/or combination and the significant legal documents which form an integral part of that process. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors. The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined. Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations. Discussion of negotiations theory, strategy, communications skills, and ethical issues. Students negotiate several different types of situations, both transactional and in anticipation of litigation. Students research the problems to be negotiated, and prepare various written products, which may include drafting a contract, evaluations of each negotiation, and/or a final analytical paper discussing some aspect of the negotiations process. This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Practice Foundation Transactions (3) Law-7657
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the multi-faceted world of business transactions through simulations and exercises based on transactions that lawyers handle in practice. Students will not only develop their skills in contract drafting, negotiating and advising, but will also gain insight into the roles of business lawyers as problem solvers and project managers. This course is designed so that students learn to work on transactions from beginning to end. Students will receive information about a transaction from “the client”, will enter into negotiations, both face – to – face and through exchanged contract drafts, will provide written advice back to the client and will close the deal by working with opposing counsel. Each simulation or drafting exercise is a hands - on approach to cultivate the habits and values necessary to build a successful transactional practice. The course will provide students with a foundation for the effective and ethical handling of business transactions. The foundational skills that the course will address are: drafting contract documents, simulated negotiations and client interactions, and professional self-reflection. Students will learn to identify client objectives, understand the business context of the matter, spot legal and business issues, evaluate options and alternatives, learn the common elements of business transactions and implement a well-chosen course of action to achieve the client’s objectives. Students will receive feedback about their progress and work. Students will also be required to self – evaluate. The class is designed to enable students to work in a variety of business areas, with various clients, and with opposing counsel. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement. Note: this course may become a required course in future years, and if that occurs, the course in later years will not meet the Practice Oriented Writing requirement.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)
This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings. Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Psychology of Conflict Resolution (3) Law-7333
Lawyers and their clients often get caught up with negative emotions, such as anger and fear, that undermine their ability to engage in effective problem-solving. This course offers a powerful framework to help students develop an understanding of the emotional and psychological dynamics of conflict and to learn inter-personal skills that will help them work through conflict constructively. There are both intra-personal and inter-personal components to the course. This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of their own emotions, judgments and biases, and of how their unconscious “default” communication styles create and exacerbate conflict. The course also offers prescriptive strategies for working through emotionally charged situations with others. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with course techniques through in-class and out-of-class exercises. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, students must be open and willing to examine their own behavior and motivations and to experiment with new ways of communicating with others. This course is an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Real Estate Tax Planning JD (2) Law-7884
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Property I, & Property II. Taxation of Business Organization is recommended.

Real Estate Transactions (3) Law-7870
A study of various aspects of real estate transactions and financing. Topics may include contracts of sale, brokerage, buyer-seller rights and obligations, title insurance, development, commercial leasing, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, foreclosure, receivership, priorities, subordination, suretyship, securitization, tax considerations, and strategies of negotiation and drafting. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636 California Bar Tested
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies. Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law. This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time. Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. Enrollment is limited to third and fourth year law students.

Spontaneous Order and the Law (3) Law-7831
This course shows how experimental economics can be used to understand how spontaneous, self-generating orders emerge (out of apparent chaos) in law and economics. This course uses a combination of hands-on learning in laboratory experiments and Socratic roundtable discussions of readings. In addition to current research in experimental economics, the readings range from works by Yale law professor Robert Ellickson to the 18th century Scottish enlightenment philosophers Adam Smith, David Hume, and their modern intellectual heir F.A. Hayek. Students who take this course will learn how experimental economics can be used to understand how exchange systems work and how rules of law emerge to undergird exchange. For much of the course, our particular focus will be on property. Our three guiding texts will be Ellickson’s Order without Law, Stephen Buckle's Natural Law and the Theory of Property: Grotius to Hume, Hayek’s Law, Legislation, and Liberty, Volume 1: Rules and Order. By building on this experience students will develop projects to explore different applications to the theory and law of property.

Tax Exempt Organizations JD (2) Law-7901
An examination of the federal income tax aspects of forming, operating and terminating taxexempt organizations, including the qualification rules, the unrelated business income tax, the restrictions with respect to private inurement, lobbying and political activities, and the private foundation rules. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Tax Procedure & Administration JD (3) Law – 7609
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Tax Procedure and Administration Clinic (1) Law-7612
The clinical component of the Tax Procedure and Administration course allows students to handle actual tax controversy cases for low income taxpayers on a pro bono basis before the IRS and in U.S. Tax Court under special rules of student practice. Students learn the practical application of tax procedures and handle all aspects of their cases, including trial if necessary. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and concurrent enrollment in Tax Procedure and Administration. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination. Prerequisites: successful completion of Evidence. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course. Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list.

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested
This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Scholarly Writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members receive one graded unit of academic credit in the second semester that they have served on the staff; and, thereafter, 2) editors may each receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school. In addition, each Staff Editor [2L's] enroll in Directed Research during the semester that they are writing a student note for up to three (3) units.

Nexus Journal Law-7867
Nexus is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students. The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and, 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester. The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy the writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor. This course may satisfy either the Substantial Writing requirement OR the Practical Writing Requirement.

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education. Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism. Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiation, Mediation, Representation in Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional or national level of competition, or three units for Arbitration, Trial, and Appellate competitions outside the law school. This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum. Only Appellate Moot Court Competitions (or other competitions requiring a substantial written brief) may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.

+-Fall 2014 (LL.M.)

Corporate Tax I (3) Law-7613
The basic federal income tax consequences to regular corporations and their shareholders of incorporations, capital contributions, corporate operations, dividend and other distributions, stock dividends, redemptions and liquidations, the accumulated earnings tax, and the personal holding company tax. S corporation taxation will also be briefly discussed.

Criminal Procedure: Practice and Professionalism (2) Law-8023
This course is designed to give the students the skills and information litigators need to know when they appear in court. Students will understand how to independently handle misdemeanor filings, pre trial negotiations, motions, felony preliminary hearings and misdemeanor jury trials. This course is designed to prepare you for your spring semester externship by providing an understanding of criminal terminology, common penal and evidence code sections, and the most common type of jury trials that you will likely handle including domestic violence and driving under the influence. At the conclusion of the semester, the students will have been exposed to a wide variety of topics that they are likely to encounter in their externship placements.

Estate and Gift Taxation – LL.M (3) Law-7834
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.

Income Tax for LL.M Students (3) Law-7618
This course presumes some familiarity with the federal income tax. The course will focus on (1) the taxation of property transactions and related tax shelter issues, and (2) principles of tax accounting. Topics covered will include realization and recognition, nonrecognition transactions such as like-kind exchanges and involuntary conversions, transactions involving debt, depreciation and amortization, capital gains and losses (and related issues such as depreciation recapture), loss limitation rules and the alternative minimum tax, accounting periods, accounting methods, installment sales, time value of money rules (original issue discount and related rules), and the relationship between tax and financial accounting. This course may not be taken by J.D. students.

Income Taxation of Trusts, Estates, and Beneficiaries (2) Law-7839
The federal income taxation of trusts, estates and beneficiaries, including the determination of taxable income and tax liability, distributable net income, distribution, income in respect of a decedent and other income tax issues resulting from the death of a decedent, grantor trusts, foreign trusts and charitable trusts. Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. students.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Preliminary Hearings (2) Law-8022
This course focuses on specialized, advanced topics in advocacy, and specifically on putting on and defending felony preliminary hearings in California. It is open only to students who will be serving as an extern or LLM-trial advocacy lawyer in Spring 2010. Units of study will include the timing of the hearing, the role of the defendant at the hearing, limitations on the right to a public hearing, the holding order, evidentiary rules at the hearing, and superior court review of the magistrate’s decision.

Real Estate Tax Planning (2) Law-7885
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisites: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students; Partnership Tax.

Tax Exempt Organizations LL.M. (2) Law-7616
An examination of the federal income tax aspects of forming, operating and terminating taxexempt organizations, including the qualification rules, the unrelated business income tax, the restrictions with respect to private inurement, lobbying and political activities, and the private foundation rules.

Tax Procedure and Admin – LL.M (3) Law-7619
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties.

+-Spring 2014

Advanced Family Violence Clinic (1-2) Law-7629
The Advanced Family Violence Clinic is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic Director. The Family Violence Clinic Director, Professor Marisa Cianciarulo, will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced Family Violence Clinic student prior to registration. The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned), but will not exceed two credits. Advanced Family Violence Clinic students are exempt from the weekly seminar portion of the regular Family Violence Clinic.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic students represent Orange County victims of domestic violence in applications for domestic-violence related immigration relief and/or domestic violence protection orders or may be involved in legal outreach and related limited representation. In addition to casework at the AFJC, Advanced Family Violence Clinic students will either meet bi-weekly with clinic faculty on an individual basis for case supervision or weekly with other advanced students and their supervisor. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Cianciarulo. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Note: The protection order section of the Advanced Family Violence Clinic meets at the OCFJC on Friday afternoons throughout the semester.

Advanced Federal Income Tax (2) Law-7879
This course is a continuation of the basic Federal Income Taxation course. It includes federal income tax topics that are not generally addressed in detail or at all in the basic course, such as: in-depth coverage of tax accounting issues, taxation of intellectual property, taxation within families, tax consequences of litigation, alternative minimum tax, employee benefits and deferred compensation, and the fundamentals of business entity taxation and international taxation.

This course is a core requirement for the Taxation certificate. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803
This course will focus on the resources, process, and strategy of legal research. The course will include instruction on primary law such as legislative and administrative documents, and secondary sources, including practice materials. Students will be required to complete several research assignments to demonstrate competence using print and online resources to research and analyze legal issues. There is no final exam.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation. Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience. Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others. There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic. Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Advanced Seminar: Gambling Law (3) Law-7306
This course covers the law and policy of regulating gambling, one of the fastest growing segments of the entertainment industry. The course will examine the history and current development of, as well as possible future changes to, gambling regulation in California, the United States, and other parts of the world. Topics discussed will include casino gambling, lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering, sports-betting, Indian gaming, and Internet gambling.

This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.

Advanced Seminar: Holocaust (2) Law-7823
This course examines international human rights law through the legacy of the Holocaust. Topics to be covered are: 1) the legal system of Nazi Germany; 2) prosecution of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg and subsequent prosecutions under national legal systems, including the Eichmann trial in Israel, and the work in the United States of the Office of Special Investigations in the U.S. Department of Justice; 3) Holocaust denial, including the Irving v. Lipstadt in England; 4) Holocaust and the internet, including the Yahoo decisions in France and the United States and laws in various European nations dealing with hate speech and glorification of the Nazi era; 5) Holocaust restitution litigation in the United States to recover stolen wartime assets, including Nazi looted art; and 6) the legal legacy of the Holocaust upon the current International Criminal Court.

This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing requirement.

Advanced Seminar: Refugee Law (2) Law-7508
This course provides an in-depth analysis of refugee law from international, domestic and comparative perspectives. The course examines the ancient and modern origins of refugee law, the development of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol to the Convention, and the domestic application of the principles of the Convention and Protocol by the United States and other countries. Topics addressed include the legal definition of persecution; refugee claims based on race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, political opinion, and gender; and the practical aspects of representing individuals applying for refugee protection. Readings include cases from the United States and other Convention signatory countries, domestic statutes and regulations, UNHCR guidance, scholarly articles, and other materials relating to refugee law. Students seeking to satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement will research and write a paper and prepare an oral presentation on a relevant topic of their choice. Students seeking to satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement will write a legal brief based on a set of facts and materials that they will receive. There are no prerequisites for this course.

This course may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

Advanced Seminar: U.S. Copyright Law (3) Law-7822
This course offers an in-depth analysis of the rights and remedies afforded to copyright owners under U.S. law. The course will make extensive use of images and sounds. We will discuss the theoretical, economic and policy aspects of copyright law and engage in a number of practical exercises such as preparing correspondence with (hypothetical) clients, cease and desist letters, legal memoranda, and licensing agreements. Work prepared for these practical exercises will apply toward satisfying the course’s writing requirement (which is in lieu of a final exam). At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret and apply the statutory provisions, and to identify and articulate the scope of U.S. copyright protection and its limitations, the essential elements of a copyright infringement claim, the defenses and strategies available to a defendant, and the related bodies of law typically involved in copyright disputes. The classes will focus on applying case law and the statute to various hypothetical situations with the goal of preparing students to handle the copyright issues and problems typically encountered by a lawyer in practice.

This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Advanced Topic: Healthcare Law (3) Law-7549
This course provides students with a practical understanding of the legal issues pertaining to health care organizations, health care system access, health care delivery, health care/insurance financing, the responsibilities of health care professionals to patients, and the relationship among health care providers and payers. This course will give the student an opportunity to think critically about the role of politics and economics in health care law, the effectiveness of federal and state agencies charged with rule making and enforcement, as well as the tension among the various segments of the health care delivery system (e.g. physicians, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, federal and state agencies).

Advanced Topic: In-House Corporate Practice Seminar (2) Law-7338

Appellate Tax Clinic (1-2) Law-7642
This course offers the opportunity for students to participate in actual appellate tax cases conducted under the auspices of The Center for Fair Administration of Taxation. Students enrolled in the course may participate as amicus curiae in significant matters of federal, state or local tax law. Students conduct research on legal issues, draft appellate briefs, and depending on the jurisdiction of the court and the nature of the case, present their brief before an appellate court.

Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax, Civil Procedure, top 40% class rank and permission of professor. Students should submit a resume in advance. Enrollment limited to clinic current case-load (typically 2-4 students.) Registration allowed only with prior approval. May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Arbitration (3) Law-7659
If you have clients who drive a car; go to the doctor; use a credit card; have a cell phone; buy insurance; hire a contractor; rent property or have a job . . . they will be exposed to the law of Arbitration. This 3 unit course will be taught by an experienced Trial Lawyer who has litigated Arbitrations on behalf of Claimants and Respondents and has Presided over Arbitrations making Awards and Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law. This will be a 'hands on' skills course designed to teach the history and fundamentals of arbitration practice along with its relationship to the Courts. The course will involve comprehensive study of rules and code sections as well as exposure to various arbitration providers and practical information about conducting Arbitration Hearings, with real time exercises in Hearing Procedures and Brief Writing. Current updates in the law of Arbitration will be made on a regular basis and students will make oral presentations and do practical exercises to enhance their skills as potential Arbitration Litigators. With recent budget cuts in the Judicial Branch of Government and the dramatic closure of Civil Courts throughout California, Arbitration will soon be the only alternative to litigation when our civil justice system can no longer accommodate the needs of the civil litigant.

For maximum benefit of the course materials it is suggested that all students have previously completed classes in torts; contracts; civil procedure and evidence. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part II (3) Law-7805
This advanced course will cover both individual and business reorganizations in Chapter 11, including assumption and rejection of leases and other executory contracts, preparation of disclosure statements, and negotiation and confirmation of plans. Students will be expected to engage in role-playing exercise to simulate the competing interests of debtor, unsecured creditors and secured creditors in the reorganization effort. Prerequisite: Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice Part I.

This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Business Planning (2) Law-7515
The goal of this course, through reviewing actual documents and agreements (and through class discussion), is to have students become familiar with certain legal and business relationships/issues raised in documents, business agreements and other contracts — from a practical (real life) perspective. Generally, class discussions track the formation, growth and eventual sale of a California business. We begin by analyzing and comparing different business entity structures. We then examine the relationship and conflicting motivations of owners, officers and employees of the business. With the growth of the business, we move to a review of the various interactions a business has with its consultants, employees, venture investors, banks and vendors. We end the course with an examination of the eventual merger/acquisition of the business. Practical problems and solutions are the focus of this course. It is intended to provide an important component of preparing students who will be advising and/or interacting with California businesses.

This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

California Civil Procedure (2) Law-7817 California Bar Tested
This course continues the study of civil procedure with advanced focus on California's procedural structure, including ways in which California procedure differs from federal civil practice. Areas of study include state practice in complex civil litigation, discovery, pleading, summary judgment, former adjudication and other advanced principles. Students will be expected to analyze complex fact patterns and to discern the ways in which California procedure differs from federal practice.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I and II.

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics: relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court. The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Prerequisite: Evidence.

Civil Rights Law (3) Law-7519
This course will study legal actions that seek redress for violations of the Constitution and the major federal anti-discrimination statutes. Topics will include remedies for violations of constitutional rights against those who act under color of law, discrimination in education, employment, housing, and public accommodations, the rights of people with disabilities, the rights of language minorities, voting rights, and affirmative action. There will also be substantial instruction in the lawyering process and legal writing.

This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Commercial Leasing (2) Law-7521
This course introduces students to one of the most important areas of real estate practice: commercial lease law and negotiation. Students are required to master elements of legal substance and theory concerning the leasing of commercial property, as well as methods of practice and negotiation. In addition to studying sophisticated commercial leases, case opinions, and other textual materials, students draft and revise provisions of commercial leases, and ultimately, negotiate an entire lease transaction. Strongly recommended: successful completion of Real Estate Transactions and Finance. This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate and the Business Law certificate.

This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Comparative Law (3) Law-7524
This course, through readings and class discussion, documentaries and guest speakers, introduces the American law student to the rich legal traditions around the world. We begin by examining English law, the legal system most comparable to our own and which forms the basis of Anglo-American law. We then move to the European Continent and civil law by studying law in Germany. The course then examines two non-Western legal traditions: Chinese law and Islamic Law. The tremendous growth of the Chinese economy and the growing political importance of China in the 21st century is the motivation for examining Chinese law. We end the course with an examination of Islamic Law, a religious-based legal tradition. This course will probably be only course a student takes in law school that examines law outside of the United States. It provides an important component of preparing the future lawyer to practice in a globalized legal world.

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court. Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court.

This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients. Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law. The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation. Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney. Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products, including a client letter, a memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client.

This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: the Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement. Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor. If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested
California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states, and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well. This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction. Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Community Property course description for Section 1 with Commissioner Hickman:
The organizing idea for the text and the course is that California community property is a “classification” system; property is either community or separate property based upon the date and source of acquisition of the property. Problems arise when spouses claim separate property interests in community property, community property interests in separate property, devote community effort to separate property, or make agreements, before or during marriage, or after date of separation or dissolution of the marriage, but before judgment is entered, on their property issues. All of these issues, and more, from acquisition of community property to its division upon dissolution of marriage, will be explored.

Constitutional Law I and II (3/3) Law-7127 and Law-7129 California Bar Tested
These courses cover the powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, as well as selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States.

Corporate Stock & Asset Acquisition (2) Law-7898
This course is the JD approved version of Corporate Tax II.
Students will study advanced topics not generally covered in the Taxation of Business Organizations course. Topics include tax-free reorganizations, acquisitive reorganizations, and carryover of corporate tax attributes, including net operation losses. (Designated as “Corporate Tax II” in the LL.M. program).

Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax, Advanced Federal Income Tax, or Taxation of Business Organizations.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for profit corporations. Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate. The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers. The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.

Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) Law-7303
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance, bail, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury proceedings, preliminary hearing, joinder and severance of offenses and defendants, right to speedy trial, guilty pleas, discovery, trial by jury, publicity, and double jeopardy.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.

Directed Research (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings. To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing. The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required. The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester. Students cannot register for a Directed Research project online. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project.

With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practice Oriented writing requirement. One course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements.

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults. The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly. In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings. The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice.

Enrollment is limited to 14 students. Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure II; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers. Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films. Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC; acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases. Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company.

Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Estate and Gift Tax – JD (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Estate Planning - JD (2) Law-7837
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance. The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents, such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests.

Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials. Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654)
Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7588), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654). Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills. For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN.

Externships can be taken for 3, 4, or 5 units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units. (Law firm externships can be taken for 1 or 2 units, only). An externship of at least 3 units

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 2 weeks before the start of the semester. Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above). If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within 1 week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements. The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times.

Externships of at least 3 units will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students. Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families. Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by US Citizenship and Immigration Services. The clinic operates out of the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim. The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills. In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision. There are no pre- or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

You may register for this course online; however, enrollment is contingent upon completion of an application process. The application is available on the Registrar’s website under “Forms.” Please make sure you complete the application and turn it in to Maria Sanchez on the fourth floor by November 18, 2013. Timely completion of the application process is necessary to ensure confirmation of enrollment before classes begin.

Note: FVC class meets on Tuesdays from 1:15 to 2:30. There is a required orientation held on Friday January 17 and Friday, January 24 from 1:15 to 4:00 pm. Please notify Professor Seiden or Professor Marzouk prior to registering of any potential scheduling conflict during orientation. Please note that the FVC is a restricted withdrawal course. The last day to add/drop for Spring 2014 is Wednesday January 15, 2014.

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students. Under faculty supervision, FVC-Protection Order students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence in court on applications for protective orders in Orange County Superior Court, Family Division. FVC students also advise pro per applicants for restraining orders before they appear in court on their own for domestic violence hearings. The clinic operates out of the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim. The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, direct and cross examination, entering exhibits in court, and related trial skills. In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two or three for case supervision. FVC-Protection Order students must be enrolled in or have taken Evidence.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

You may register for this course online; however, enrollment is contingent upon completion of an application process. The application is available on the Registrar’s website under “Forms.” Please make sure you complete the application and turn it in to Maria Sanchez on the fourth floor by November 18, 2013. Timely completion of the application process is necessary to ensure confirmation of enrollment before classes begin.

Note: FVC class meets on Tuesdays from 1:15 to 2:30. There is a required orientation held on Friday January 17 and Friday, January 24 from 1:15 to 4:00 pm.
Please notify Professor Seiden or Professor Marzouk prior to registering of any potential scheduling conflict during orientation. Please note that the FVC is a restricted withdrawal course. The last day to add/drop for Spring 2014 is Wednesday January 15, 2014.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized.

All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Federal Tax Research – JD (2) Law-7889
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. These specialized materials are often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores techniques in tax research and is also an extensive survey of primary and secondary sources in taxation. Classes focus on online research; there are several homework assignments and a short final paper.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is an elective for the Certificate in Taxation.

Gender, Sexual Orientation and the Law (2) Law-7547
This two-unit course focuses on gender- and sexual orientation-related case law, doctrine, theory and practice. It explores how the law deals with differences between women and men, how societal beliefs about gender norms influence the law and vice versa, and how gender and sexual orientation issues affect us in our personal and professional lives. We will examine how the pursuit of gender and sexual orientation equality has shaped not only American jurisprudence, but also gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. Readings will include court cases, historical documents, and scholarly essays on gender and sexual orientation equality in the United States. Students will research and write a paper on a relevant topic. There are no prerequisites for this subject. Students of both sexes and all political views are encouraged to enroll.

This course satisfies the Scholarly Writing Requirement.

Immigration and Refugee Law (2) Law-7552
This course provides an introduction into the examination of US law (constitutional, statutory, and administrative) governing the entry, presence, and expulsion of foreign nationals (aliens). Topics include: sources of federal immigration power, immigrant and non-immigrant categories, exclusion, admission, deportability, refugees, and unauthorized migrants.

International Law (2) Law-7558
This is the introductory course in international law, covering the nature and sources of international law and its major developments. This course introduces students to the basic law of the international organizational system, including the United Nations and UN specialized agencies. The course introduces concepts of international law and how they achieve legitimacy in the international system through United Nations organizations and conferences, the International Court of Justice, the International Law Commission, treaty bodies, and state practice. The law of foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine are considered along with the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues.

Students will have the option to write a substantial paper to satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement in lieu of the final exam. This course counts for the International Law Emphasis Requirement and the required Public International Law Class for the Emphasis.


International Trade Law Seminar (3 credits) Law-7556
In this course we will examine the trade commitments that countries have made under the World Trade Organization (WTO), with emphasis on the United States' participation. As part of the course, we will discuss some basic provisions of the central treaty, General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (GATT), as well as some specific agreements, including, briefly, Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (ASCM). We will also consider exceptions to trade commitments, such as environmental and public health exceptions.

This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.

Internet Law (3) Law-7554
This course explores the legal issues arising out of the Internet's growing role as a personal, commercial, and public forum. Topics include Internet commerce, intellectual property issues, domain name rights, jurisdictional puzzles, and free speech on the Internet. Students need no technical expertise beyond knowing how to use electronic mail and the World Wide Web.

This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Land Use Regulation (3) Law-7626
This course examines the government regulation of land use and development. It is a course in applied constitutional, administrative, and property law. The material covers land use planning, zoning, advanced and flexible zoning mechanisms, subdivision controls, constitutional and state law constraints on regulation, the economics and politics of land development, growth controls, the environmental regulation of land use and ecosystems, and alternatives to regulation. Students are exposed to business decision making, public problem solving, regulatory permitting, and social science analyses.

This is a core requirement for the ENLURE certificate. Students enrolled in this course for Spring 2014 must also enroll in the one-unit Land Use Regulation Practice lab course.

Land Use Regulation Practice Lab (1) Law-7357
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to Professor Stahl's Land Use Regulation course. It is limited to students enrolled in Professor Stahl's course. The lab course will serve as a supplement to the main Land Use Course. In particular, the lab course is a tool for providing students with the opportunity to learn practical writing and advocacy skills through document drafting and participation in mock planning commission meetings. Students will learn to draft documents relevant to a Land Use practice. Specific drafting assignments are left to the discretion of the lab professor, but examples may include letters to clients; applications for land use entitlements such as a variance, special use permit, or vesting subdivision map, memoranda of law regarding legal issues such as takings, equal protection, the Fair Housing Act, vested rights/nonconforming use, and so forth. Students may also prepare for and participate in a mock meeting of a planning commission, zoning board, or city council. The course also provides an opportunity for students to receive extended, amplified, instruction on the doctrine from a practitioner. Such instruction, delivered through lecture or practice problems or role-playing, would help the students understand how the doctrine discussed in the main course shows up in day-to-day practice.

The course will satisfy the practical legal writing and/or practical skills requirement.

Law and Motion (2) Law-7648
This upper-level elective course provides a comprehensive overview of civil and criminal law and motion practice, addressing one of the most important and widely-used tools in a litigator’s arsenal. Enrolled students will receive practical training, drafting projects and a detailed understanding of the various types of motions, including those relating to pleadings, discovery, sanctions, dismissal, summary judgment, joinder/bifurcation, settlement, continuance, mistake, evidence, damages, new trial, and more. Moving beyond the theoretical law school framework, California Law & Motion Practice presents the law in a real-world context, with early exposure to concepts, techniques, assignments and strategies that are typically first encountered in summer associate programs or upon entering a firm or agency after graduation. The course will cover the following: 1) the legal basis and general strategic use of dozens of essential civil motions; 2) a thorough exploration of the procedural rules that govern the drafting and filing of motions in California courts; 3) drafting exercises and writing projects with professor feedback; and, 4) visits to a live law & motion hearing in Orange County Superior Court that will include a private follow-up Q&A with the hearing judge and motion research attorney. The course focuses primarily on civil motions but does dedicate one class session to a comprehensive review of essential criminal motions.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement or Practice Oriented Writing but not both.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504 - California Bar Tested
This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery. The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems. Enrollment in this course is by application only UNLESS student is in the bottom 50% of the class. Students in the bottom 50% of the class may register for this course without submitting an application, and as otherwise noted, students in the bottom 25% of the class MUST take this course in order to graduate. Applications by students in the upper 50% of their class must be submitted to the Director of Bar Services, Professor Mario Mainero, at mmainero@chapman.edu by 5:00 p.m. on November 11, 2013.
Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them.

Legal & Business Affairs in Hollywood (3) Law-7352
An overview of the primary areas of practice in which a lawyer and/or business affairs executive engage at a typical Hollywood studio throughout all phases of development, production, marketing and distribution of theatrical motion pictures. Emphasis will be placed on the business aspects in each of these areas and the economics of the various revenues streams exploited in such distribution. Deal structures will be taught for the customary transactions entered into for both “in-house” productions as well as films financed and/or produced by third parties but distributed by the studio (i.e. acquisitions, negative pick-ups, co-productions, split rights arrangements, etc.) as well as studio deals with financial partners to lay off economic risk. The course will conclude with an exercise in which the students will select a motion picture slate made up of various genres, cast and deal models they will select based upon the project elements of actual (but anonymous) Hollywood studio productions. The success of those slates will then be projected as revealed by the actual performance of the movies from which those elements were taken.

This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Legal Drafting (2) Law-7573
This course develops the student’s legal writing skills in a variety of areas not covered in a traditional first year legal research and writing course. The student learns to draft wills, contracts, pleadings, discovery plans, discovery, closing arguments to a jury, legislation, client letters, demand letters, settlement proposals, tactical memoranda, and more.

This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters. Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation. In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study. Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class. Priority is given to students who are required to take this course.

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes.

The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators. While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases.
The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace. The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers. The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning. Students will be graded on full participation in the Mediation Clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation for Juveniles (2) Law-7354
The Juvenile Hall Mediation Program provides significant benefits for juveniles in the correctional system. Under the supervision of the clinic director, students mediate conflicts between the minors in Riverside County Juvenile Hall. Students also teach peer mediation skills to juveniles specially selected to work with the program. In the long term, this will teach the residents the skills necessary to prevent and solve conflict before causing larger issues. Since many youths in juvenile hall have not been exposed to conflict resolution devices, this program provides a unique and critical tool to assist these at-risk individuals. The clinic meets on Tuesdays from 6:00 p.m. to 7:40 p.m. Students go to Juvenile Hall in Riverside on Thursdays from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. to work with the minors.

Municipal Ordinances (3) Law-7656
In this course, students will learn how to navigate, analyze, and interpret county and city laws/ordinances. Students will have the opportunity to work with real city ordinances and will be provided with actual draft ordinances authored by municipal attorneys. Classes will consist of reviewing and in some instances revising draft ordinances to determine and/or address the potential impacts of the ordinance on property owners, neighborhood associations, business groups and other stakeholders. Students will be exposed to a wide range of municipal issues ranging from backyard chicken keeping to the regulation and control of big box retail stores and cell towers.

This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.


National Security Law (2) Law-7569
National Security law focuses on how law regulates U.S. national security policies, practices, and institutions. Organized an introduction into these issues, it covers: how national security responsibilities are shared between the branches of government, the role of international law, the use of armed forces abroad, intelligence operations, and detention. This includes topics such as NSA operations, Guantanamo, and conflicts in Afghanistan, Libya, and Vietnam. Legal sources studied include: the Constitution, statutes, treaties, customary international law, executive orders, departmental regulations, and historical precedents. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law II or concurrent enrollment.

This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. This course is an approved elective for the International Law Certificate.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors. The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined. Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law.

This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time. This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations. Discussion of negotiations theory, strategy, communications skills, and ethical issues. Students negotiate several different types of situations, both transactional and in anticipation of litigation. Students research the problems to be negotiated, and prepare various written products, which may include drafting a contract, evaluations of each negotiation, and/or a final analytical paper discussing some aspect of the negotiations process.

This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Patent Law and Practice (3) Law-7815
This course offers an in-depth exploration of patent law. The course covers standards for patentability, the patent application process, claim construction, infringement, defenses to infringement, and remedies for patent infringement. The course also includes discussion and practical exercises related to the practice of patent law. These include patent claim drafting exercises and litigation exercises related to claim construction and the pleading of a patent case. We will also touch upon the distinction between patent law and the law of trade secrets.

Students are not required to have a technical background to take this course. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Patent Litigation (2) Law-7337
This course offers a practical overview of the legal issues, litigation strategies and procedural stages encountered in U.S. patent litigation. The course will follow the progress of a typical patent infringement lawsuit from the pre-filing investigation stage through pre-trial proceedings, trial, appeal and settlement.

This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Practice Foundation Transactions (3) Law-7657
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the multi-faceted world of business transactions through simulations and exercises based on transactions that lawyers handle in practice. Students will not only develop their skills in contract drafting, negotiating and advising, but will also gain insight into the roles of business lawyers as problem solvers and project managers. This course is designed so that students learn to work on transactions from beginning to end. Students will receive information about a transaction from “the client”, will enter into negotiations, both face – to – face and through exchanged contract drafts, will provide written advice back to the client and will close the deal by working with opposing counsel. Each simulation or drafting exercise is a hands - on approach to cultivate the habits and values necessary to build a successful transactional practice.

The course will provide students with a foundation for the effective and ethical handling of business transactions. The foundational skills that the course will address are: drafting contract documents, simulated negotiations and client interactions, and professional self-reflection. Students will learn to identify client objectives, understand the business context of the matter, spot legal and business issues, evaluate options and alternatives, learn the common elements of business transactions and implement a well-chosen course of action to achieve the client’s objectives.

Students will receive feedback about their progress and work. Students will also be required to self – evaluate. The class is designed to enable students to work in a variety of business areas, with various clients, and with opposing counsel. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement. Note: this course may become a required course in future years, and if that occurs, the course in later years will not meet the Practice Oriented Writing requirement.

Pre-Trial Civil Practice (3) Law-7596
This course centers on practical exercises in the preparation of litigation documents. Exercises may include the preparation of a complaint, cross-claim or counter-claim, answer, discovery documents, pre-trial and post trial motions, and trial briefs.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)
This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings. Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing Plans – JD (2) Law-7882
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP) and stock bonus plans and their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Recommended: Advanced Federal Income Taxation.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Securities Regulation (3) Law-7606
This course covers the federal regulation of the distribution and sale of stocks and other securities as a means of financing business operations. Students will closely examine the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course will explore such topics as the definition and nature of securities; the registration and sale of securities to investors; exemptions from registration for public and private offerings; the philosophy of mandatory disclosure rules; the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission; the role of underwriters; civil and criminal liability of corporate issuers, directors, and officers for fraud and manipulation of securities markets; the regulation of brokers and dealers; and the unique professional responsibilities of attorneys who practice in the securities field. It is recommended that students successfully complete Corporations prior to this course.

For Spring 2014, students who enroll in this course must also enroll in the 1-unit Securities Regulation Practice Lab course (please see course description for Lab). This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Securities Regulation Practice Lab (1) Law-7356
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to the Securities Regulation doctrinal course (Law 7606). Students must simultaneously be enrolled in both this lab course and in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course. Only students who are enrolled in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course may enroll in this lab course. This is a practical, hands-on course covering the documents and strategic drafting concerns related to federal and state securities regulation. Tracking the topics covered in the Securities Regulation doctrinal course, the lab course introduces students to the process of investigating, analyzing and drafting documents compliant with selected federal and state statutes, rules, and regulations governing the offer and sale of securities within the United States. Students will learn to review and draft relevant portions of periodic reports required by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, offering documents for public or private securities offerings, and memoranda intended to provide appropriate written legal advice on questions of securities law.

This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Secured Transactions (3 units) Law-7605
“No Money Down,” “0% A.P.R.,” “No Payments for 24 Months.” Innocent enough in their own right, each of these familiar phrases openly welcomes the consumer to the world of secured transactions. Generally speaking, a secured transaction is one in which a debtor borrows money from a creditor and designates property as collateral to secure repayment of the loan. A classic example would be the financed purchase of an automobile. Should the debtor fail to make the required payments, the secured party may take legal action or (in some instances) repossess the property. Secured transactions fuel a substantial part of the American economy. In this course, we will examine various rules governing debtor/creditor and creditor/creditor relationships, addressing several key questions: how do financial institutions protect themselves against borrower default, what happens when the debtor files for bankruptcy protection, and who wins when similarly-situated creditors must square off against each other in the fight for the debtor’s vulnerable assets? Given that many of the rules governing secured transactions in personal property are found in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, we will frequently consult its provisions. In laying a core conceptual foundation, we will also address secured transactions in real property, including the ramifications of mortgaging property and the legal and equitable rights of mortgagors and mortgages prior to and during the foreclosure process. In each session, we will apply the law to hypothetical problems presented, and as a result, students completing the course will have a knowledge base critical to the effective representation of average consumers, growing businesses, insolvent/bankrupt debtors, and sophisticated financial institutions. The course provides a solid foundation for courses in Bankruptcy Law.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636 - California Bar Tested
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies. Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law. This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time. Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.

Enrollment is limited to third and fourth year law students.

Seminar on selected Issues in International Trade and Development (3) Law-7359
This seminar examines the role that formal law, legal principles, and informal norms play in the economic, legal and political development of nations. Particular emphasis will be on the continuing debate over the role of law in economic and political development. In this respect, we will discuss some public international law issues such as human rights, international trade law issues such as the World Trade Organization rules, and international financial issues (the Bretton Woods system) such as capital movement and currency (hard and soft currencies and the relative decline of the dollar in the international economic system). Although we will study development in different historical, regional, and cultural contexts, the goal will be to develop a richer understanding of the complex role that both de jure and de facto law play in international development generally.

This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Sports Law (3) Law-7829
This course will cover selected legal issues in amateur and professional sports including player draft and option systems; labor and employment relations in professional sports; eligibility and discipline issues; agents and player representation; inter-league disputes; buying and moving teams; sex discrimination in sports; and Olympic competition.

This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate.

Taxation of Business Organizations - JD (3) Law-7608
Problems in the taxation of subchapter K partnerships, subchapter C corporations, and subchapter S corporations are covered by this course. Topics pertaining to partnership taxation include the formation, operation, and termination of general and limited partnerships. Class discussion is held concerning the definition of the partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership as an association. Topics pertaining to corporate taxation include tax treatment of a corporation and a corporate shareholder with respect to corporate formation; organization and property transfers, dividends and distributed income; accumulated earnings and undistributed income; non-liquidating corporate distributions; collapsible corporations; personal holding companies; and sale or liquidation of a corporation.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. This course is also a prerequisite for JD students who wish to enroll in Corporate Stock & Asset Acquisitions and Dispositions.

Toxic and Mass Tort Law (3)
Our technological society has spawned an explosion of toxic tort actions. Topics include special statute of limitations problems in toxic cases, the complexities of mass litigation, and problems of proof in toxic tort actions.

This course is an approved elective for the ENLURE certificate. This course may satisfy the Substantial Writing Requirement with faculty approval.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination. Prerequisite: successful completion of Evidence.

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution certificate.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - Must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course. Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list.

United States Tax Court Clinic (3) Law-7890
Under a special IRS and Tax Court rules of practice, students in this clinical education course are permitted to handle actual cases on a wide variety of tax issues at various stages of exam, appeal, court and collections. Under supervision of Attorney-Professors, students are responsible for all aspects of their cases including meeting with clients, gathering facts and evidence, researching applicable laws, and meeting with the IRS to discuss case in an effort to negotiate a favorable outcome. If the case is for trial, the student normally represents the client in court and completes all post trial work.

This course is an elective option for the Certificate in Taxation. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. (Recommended: Advanced Federal Income Tax, Taxation of Business Organizations.)


U. S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7880
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network. Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, the branch profits tax, and the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions. The course will also cover the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, including the U.S taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad, the effect of U.S. tax treaties, and the foreign tax credit mechanism.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Video Gaming Law (2) Law-7358
This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the business and legal issues related to video game development, publishing, and distribution. The course begins by breaking down a successful modern video game into its components. Students then study the following as they pertain to video games: inbound content licensing (movies, books, games), employment and work-for-hire agreements, music licensing, talent issues and agreements, technology licensing, guild issues, development and publishing agreements, content clearance, user-created content, marketing issues, censorship and ratings boards, agreements with users/purchasers, international issues, virtual property, eSports and more. While the course includes some important case law and analysis of essential aspects of intellectual property and other law that impact developers and publishers, much of the class will focus on the transactions and contracts students should expect to encounter when counseling a client in the video game industry.

Prerequisites: one of the following courses: Copyright Law; Entertainment Law; Intellectual Property; or Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested
This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.

Students enrolled in Professor McConville’s section for Spring 2014 must also enroll in the one-unit wills and trusts lab course.

Wills and Trusts Practice Lab (1) Law-7355
The lab course is a mandatory supplement to Professor McConville's Wills and Trusts Course. It is limited to students enrolled in Professor McConville's course. This course is intended to give students an opportunity to learn some of the “real life” skills involved with running a wills and trusts practice. The class will emphasize communication and writing skills. As needed, the class will provide information that will supplement and reinforce the material in the main Wills and Trusts class. Topics will center on the key elements of practicing as a wills and trusts attorney. Students will be required to perform several oral and written assignments throughout the semester, some or all of which might be completed in groups of two or more. Certain projects will require class participation. Specific drafting assignments may include letters to clients and beneficiaries; memoranda to the file memorializing discussions with the client or other issues that arise in the course of representation; portions of briefs; wills or will provisions; trusts or trust provisions; powers of appointment; and powers of attorney.

This course satisfies the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.


Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Scholarly Writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members receive one graded unit of academic credit in the second semester that they have served on the staff; and, thereafter, 2) editors may each receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school. In addition, each Staff Editor [2L's] enroll in Directed Research during the semester that they are writing a student note for up to three (3) units.

Nexus Journal Law-7867
Nexus is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students. The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life. Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and, 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester. This course may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement or the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement with faculty approval.

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education. Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism. Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiations, Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional level of competition, or three units for trial and appellate competitions outside the law school.

This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum. Only Moot Court Competitions may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.

+-Spring 2014 (LL.M.)

Advanced Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) LL.M. TAP course Law-7351
(Pat Ahle, Former Prosecutor at Anaheim City Attorney’s Office)
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance; bail, prosecutorial discretion; grand jury proceedings; preliminary hearings; joinder and severance of offenses and defendants; right to speedy trial; guilty pleas; discovery; trial by jury; publicity; double jeopardy; and post-conviction remedies and in depth analysis of numerous actual criminal trials.

Corporate Tax II (2) Law-7623
The federal income tax consequences of taxable and tax-free stock and asset acquisitions and dispositions, including reorganizations, consolidations and corporate divisions; the carryover and survival of net operating losses and other corporate attributes; and the acquisition of loss corporations.

Prerequisite: Corporate Tax I.

Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Estate Planning (2) Law-7838
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance. The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents, such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests.

Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Ethics in Tax Practice (2) Law-7887
An examination of the statutory, regulatory and ethical standards governing those who practice in the tax field, including the application of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to tax practice, Circular 230 (governing those admitted to practice before the Internal Revenue Service), and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and the Treasury Regulations governing return preparers, with lesser attention to provisions governing CPAs and other federal statutes, such as the federal conflict of interest statute. Among the areas covered are advertising and solicitation, return preparation and advice, dealing with the Internal Revenue Service in the audit and appeals process, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and uncooperative clients.

Federal Tax Research (2) Law-7888
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. These specialized materials are often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores techniques in tax research and is also an extensive survey of primary and secondary sources in taxation. Classes focus on online research; there are several homework assignments and a short final paper.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. This course is an elective for the Certificate in Taxation.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Note: this course is for international LL.M. students only.

Partnership Tax (3) Law-7886
This course concerns the federal income tax laws regarding partnerships (including limited partnerships and LLCs, among others) principally found in Subchapter K of the Internal Revenue Code. It covers the formation of a partnership; the operation of the partnership and the allocation among its members of its income, deductions, etc.; the transfer by the partnership of its property to its members; the disposition by partners of interests in the partnership; and the consequences of a partnership’s termination. There will be some emphasis on potential pitfalls for the taxpayer (and the taxpayer’s advisor) in the law of partnership taxation as well as some debate on the merits and demerits of other provisions of Subchapter K (e.g., the 704(b) regulations, Section 736, Section 754, and Section 751(b)).

Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax ( if a J.D. student) or Income Taxation for LL.M. Students (if an LL.M. student).

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing Plans – LL.M (2) Law-7883
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP) and stock bonus plans and their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions.

Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

U. S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7881
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network. Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, the branch profits tax, and the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions. The course will also cover the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, including the U.S taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad, the effect of U.S. tax treaties, and the foreign tax credit mechanism.

Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

+- Fall 2013

Administrative Law & Practice (3) Law-7503

This course provides a study of the processes of decision making by administrative agencies and their control by legislators and courts. It centers on the tension between the need for delegation of power to agencies sufficient to ensure effective government, and the need to limit that power and protect the citizen from government oppression. The course focuses particularly on administrative procedure (including notice and comment rulemaking) and deals with the concept of administrative discretion and the constitutional, statutory, and common law doctrines that control discretion in administrative decision making. Also considered are contemporary issues that bear upon the fairness of governmental action (e.g., the right to notice and hearing, confrontation of witnesses, ex parte communications, institutional decisions, and combination of functions).  For Fall 2013, there will not be an exam.  Students will be graded on a series of short practice-oriented writing assignments designed to replicate practice in administrative law; thus, for Fall 2013 this course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement.

Advanced Appellate Practice: Constitutional Argument (3) Law-7502

This course endeavors to develop students written and oral advocacy skills to the level that will prepare them for practice.  Using constitutional law as its subject matter, the course examines the process by which attorneys construct arguments and convert them to written and oral advocacy, and trains lawyers in the skills necessary to construct their own legal arguments.  Students will select cases that have appeared on the docket of the United States Supreme Court, and then brief and argue these cases.  Students will receive detailed feedback on drafts with the goal of producing a polished and professional final product that can also serve as a writing sample.  This course can satisfy the Scholarly or Practice-Oriented writing requirements.

Advanced Family Violence Clinic (1-2) Law-7629

The Advanced Family Violence Clinic is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic Director.  The Family Violence Clinic Director, Professor Marisa Cianciarulo, will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced Family Violence Clinic student prior to registration.  The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned), but will not exceed two credits.  Advanced Family Violence Clinic students are exempt from the weekly seminar portion of the regular Family Violence Clinic. 

Advanced Family Violence Clinic students represent Orange County victims of domestic violence in applications for domestic-violence related immigration relief and/or domestic violence protection orders or may be involved in legal outreach and related limited representation.  In addition to casework at the AFJC, Advanced Family Violence Clinic students will either meet bi-weekly with clinic faculty on an individual basis for case supervision or weekly with other advanced students and their supervisor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803                                                                                                                                    

This course will focus on the resources, process, and strategy of legal research. The course will include instruction on primary law such as legislative and administrative documents, and secondary sources, including practice materials. Students will be required to complete several research assignments to demonstrate competence using print and online resources to research and analyze legal issues. There is no final exam.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Mediation Clinic (1-2) Law-7849

The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation.  Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience.  Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others.  There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic.  Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated.   Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Advanced Mediation for Juveniles (2) Law-7354

Description pending.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part I (3) Law-7518

This course will explore adjustment of the debtor/creditor relationship through the federal bankruptcy laws, beginning with background discussion on the history and purpose of insolvency laws and continuing with the sources of both secured and unsecured creditor claims.  The course will cover security interests, attachment and judgment liens, filing of the bankruptcy petition and schedules, the automatic stay, and creation of the estate and discharge.  Chapter 7 liquidation and Chapter 13 wage earner plans will both be explored in depth.  Other subjects explored will be relief of stay, dischargeability litigation and the avoiding powers of the trustee.

Civil Rights Law (3) Law-7519

This course will study the laws and constitutional provisions that protect civil rights, particularly the right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, sex, national origin, age, disability, and other protected characteristics. This course will give some consideration to legal actions that seek redress for violations of other federal constitutional or statutory rights. The course will focus on techniques for constructing or defending against such actions.  This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested

This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics:  relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court.  The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828

This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court.  Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520

Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients.  Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law.  The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation.  Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney.  Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products,  including a client letter, a  memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: the Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement.  Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor.  If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested                                                                                                  

California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states, and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well.  This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction.  Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Constitutional Law I and II (3/3) Law-7127 and Law-7129 California Bar Tested

These courses cover the powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, as well as selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested

This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for‑profit corporations.  Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate.  The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers.  The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.

Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) Law-7303

This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance, bail, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury proceedings, preliminary hearing, joinder and severance of offenses and defendants, right to speedy trial, guilty pleas, discovery, trial by jury, publicity, double jeopardy, and post-conviction.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested

This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation.  Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination. 

Directed Research (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850

Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings.  To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing. The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required.  The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester. Students cannot register for  a Directed Research project online.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project.  With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practical Writing requirement.  One course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements.  Students may not make changes to the number of credits post the Add/Drop deadline for the semester.

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565     

This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults.  The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly.  In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings.  The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice.  Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Election and Political Campaign Law (2) Law-7630

This course covers federal, state and local election and political campaign laws, including the Federal Election Campaign Act; California’s Political Reform Act and Elections Code; and local election and campaign laws.  Among the topics to be addressed are First Amendment issues; campaign finance law and campaign reform; voting rights; election administration; the 2000 Presidential election; initiative, referendum and recall matters; political parties; legislative districting; election recounts and contests; ballot access; ethics; conflicts of interest; public integrity; criminal and administrative enforcement issues; and several other topics of interest relating to the political and election process.

Employment Law (3 units)

This course explores selected topics in employment law in the non-union workplace. The course covers the evolving common law and statutory approaches to regulating the employer-employee relationship from hiring to firing. Topics include employee privacy, protections against workplace discrimination, regulation of wages and hours, sexual harassment, and remedies for wrongful termination.

Entertainment Law (3) Law-7538

 This course explores legal issues connected with the development, production, and exploitation of entertainment product, focusing predominantly on filmed entertainment and news media, to some extent on musical compositions and recordings, and incidentally on other forms of entertainment. Topics include life story and personality rights (defamation, invasion of privacy, etc.); celebrity publicity rights; profit participations; collective bargaining agreements and artistic credits; non-copyright protection of ideas; contract formation and duration; ethics and regulation of talent representatives such as agents, lawyers, and managers; and selected copyright and trademark issues. Copyright is not a prerequisite, and this class should not be considered as a replacement for the copyright course. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Entertainment Law.

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631

This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers.  Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films.  Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC;  acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases.  Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.  This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Environmental Law (3) Law-7541

This course constitutes an analysis of the ends and means of environmental protection through study of statutes, administrative regulations and practices, and judicial decisions treating the protection of the environment in the United States. Topics may include statutes that regulate pollution emissions (e.g., Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act); procedural requirements (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act, California Environmental Quality Act); administrative law (e.g., standing, standards of judicial review); hazardous and toxic substances and wastes; risk assessment and management; natural resources and wildlife conservation; enforcement and liability; and environmental justice. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law. The grade in this course is based on a paper.  Note: for the course paper to apply towards the Scholarly Writing requirement, students must meet the minimum grade requirement set by the professor.    

Environmental Law & the California Environmental Quality Act (2) Law-7658

This course will focus on various California state laws, statutory provisions and regulations pertaining to environmental protection and natural resources, with a particular emphasis on the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). CEQA is often hailed as our state’s greatest tool for environmental conservation, but also viewed by many as a primary obstacle to California’s economic prosperity. Of the past year, many have called for CEQA reform.  But is reform simple? Is reform needed? This course will provide an overview of the history, current requirements, and emerging policy issues in California environmental law with a goal of giving the student a balanced understanding of CEQA well as other state environmental laws such the California Coastal Act and the California Endangered Species Act.  Students will develop greater proficiency in statutory and regulatory interpretation, together with an understanding of how environmental laws are implemented at the state and local levels through factual illustrations of questions faced by current California attorneys. Grading will be through attendance and a final paper or project. This course may be applied toward the ENLURE Certificate.

Estate and Gift Taxation – JD (3) Law-7833

A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested

This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials.  Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Evidence section with Professor Mainero – this section covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects. 

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654)

Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7588), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654).  Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills.  For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN.

Externships can be taken for 3, 4, or 5 units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units.  (Law firm externships can be taken for 1 or 2 units, only).

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 2 weeks before the start of the semester.  Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above).  If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within 1 week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements.  The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times.  Externships of at least 3 units will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Family Law (2) Law-7542

This course is a study of the extent to which the state may and does regulate family relationships. The instructor may select topics from among the following: informal and nontraditional familial relationships; control of reproduction and current reproductive technology; antenuptial and separation agreements; legitimacy, adoption, and termination of parental rights; divorce, child custody, support, and paternity proceedings; and the role of the lawyer as counselor. 

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586

The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families.  Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by US Citizenship and Immigration Services.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655

The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Protection Order students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence in court on applications for protective orders in Orange County Superior Court, Family Division.  FVC students also advise pro per applicants for restraining orders before they appear in court on their own for domestic violence hearings.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, direct and cross examination, entering exhibits in court, and related trial skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two or three for case supervision.  FVC-Protection Order students must be enrolled in or have taken Evidence.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Federal Courts/Jurisdiction (3) Law-7543 

This course examines the scope of the federal judicial power and the role of the federal judiciary in our constitutional system. It considers the relationship of the federal courts to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and the relationship of the federal courts to the state courts. As such, class discussion naturally focuses on separation of powers and federalism principles. Topics may include Supreme Court jurisdiction, congressional control of federal court jurisdiction, justiciability, non-Article III courts, state sovereign immunity, federal court abstention, section 1983, federal review of state court decisions, and federal habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133               

This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.   

Financial Accounting (3) Law-7855

This course represents an introduction to accounting for students with little background in the field. Initial emphasis is on established accounting principles and the analysis of financial statements. The course’s perspective is that of a business attorney who might use financial statements to advise clients in various legal settings (e.g., the drafting of financial contracts and the valuation of businesses). Applications to securities law are also considered. This course is a requirement for the Business Law Emphasis program, unless a student has already taken accounting.

Fundamentals of In-House Corporate Practice (2) Law-7854

This is a practical skills course in practicing as an In-House Corporate Lawyer that introduces students to the fundamentals of working effectively in a high-functioning corporate law department and prepares them for a career as an In-House Corporate Counsel.  The course will cover the structure and mechanics of corporate legal departments; leadership, effective communications and the exercise of legal ethics within a commercial organization; the use of business tools and technology; and the in-house approach to managing Intellectual property, labor & employment, significant litigation, regulatory compliance, corporate governance, international operations, outside counsel, contract negotiation and administration, and organizational crisis response.  Students will have the opportunity to perform exercises relating to each of the substantive areas of in-house practice through actual case studies of corporate legal issues, simulating actual assignments as corporate counsel.  Outside reading consists of articles and excerpts of published materials.  Class sessions consist of lecture, class discussion, practical exercises and presentations, with some prominent in-house lawyers and general counsel as guest speakers, and networking opportunities.  The final exam will consist of a write-up on a case study to be assigned on the last day of class and submitted prior to the end of the exam period. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Intellectual Property (3) Law-7555

This course surveys the primary types of intellectual property under federal and state law. It emphasizes trademarks, copyrights, and patents while also addressing unfair competition, rights of publicity, trade secrets, and protection of designs. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Entertainment Law.

International Business Litigation (2) Law-7510

This course deals with the litigation process in the United States when the subject of the litigation involves a transnational business transaction. We will examine the following topics: U.S. jurisdiction and other aspects of forum selection and forum non conveniens; service of process of a U.S. lawsuit abroad; international discovery; sovereign immunity; act of state; and enforcement of foreign judgments in American courts. Emphasis will be on acquiring practical skills in both prosecuting and defending international business litigation suits.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement.

International Business Transactions (3) Law-7559

This introductory survey course studies the major issues in international business law. While the course will not focus heavily on international trade law, it will review the subject. In addition, the course will cover two other major forms of international business, namely foreign direct investment and the licensing of technology such as trademarks and patents. The course will also deal with the regulation of international business transactions, particularly with respect to corruption, human rights, the environment, and antitrust, as well as issues of particular interest in foreign business deals such as political risk, currency devaluation, and acquiring insurance. Finally, the course will discuss the resolution of legal disputes in the international arena through litigation, arbitration, and other means. Prerequisite: International Law and Organizations.

Jurisprudence and Legal History Seminar (3) Law-7125

This is an advanced research and writing seminar that meets the law school’s scholarly writing requirement.  By use of the principal texts, we will explore at the outset of the course the original debates surrounding several key constitutional provisions.  Students will then select a constitutional provision/topic for further research and proceed in three steps:  First, each student will identify readings relevant to that provision/topic that, after consultation with the professor, will be assigned for class discussion; second, the student will make a presentation on the chosen provision/topic and lead a classroom discussion; finally, the student will draft a paper on the chosen provision/topic based on the student’s own in-depth research.  Ample time for this research and for individual meetings with the professor will be available in lieu of class sessions during the second half of the semester. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing requirement. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Land Use Dispute Practice Seminar (3) Law-7311

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of land use, zoning, and planning issues. In particular, students will review and analyze a variety of conflicts between and amongst property owners, local governments, and utilities relative to how land is used and/or developed. Students will be provided with transcripts of hearings and appellate briefs to see how actual land use disputes are argued and decided by the courts. Grading through attendance and a final paper. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.  Enrollment is limited to 20 students.  This course may be applied toward the ENLURE Certificate.

Law and Practice of the Hollywood Guilds (3) Law-7634

This course deals with laws and practices related to the most visible unions in the entertainment industry, the powerful and pervasive so-called “Hollywood Guilds.”  These are: the Writers Guild of America (WGA), the Directors Guild of America (DGA) and the newly merged Screen Actors Guild -- American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA).  Students will learn of the history of English and American labor law and consider how the US federal labor, copyright and antitrust laws frame the context today in which these unions represent the key creative elements in the making of film, television and emerging new media. A wide variety of legal issues and practices related to managing the creation, production and distribution of intellectual property and the division of the income it generates will be examined. Students will be introduced to the structure and operation of the guilds' collective bargaining agreements covering the employment of screenwriters, directors and actors/performers, as well as the guilds' regulation of agents. This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Law, Lawyers, and thLegal System in Film (3) Law-7546

The class focuses on film portrayals of law, lawyers, and the legal system as a means of exploring questions of public policy, jurisprudence, professional responsibility, and even personal philosophy and psychology – all through the lens of filmic storytelling and filmmaking technique.  Topics to be discussed include the adversary system, ethical dilemmas, various lawyer-character archetypes, the jury system, the role of judges, the tension between popular notions of justice and certain legal regimes, and the strengths and limits of the legal system as a means of resolving disputes and providing remedies.  This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.
 

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504

This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery.  The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems.  Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year students and is by application only.  Applications must be submitted to the Director of Bar Services, Professor Mario Mainero, at mmainero@chapman.edu by June 17, 2013.  Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.  However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them. 

Legal Drafting (2) Law-7573

This course develops the student’s legal writing skills in a variety of areas not covered in a traditional first year legal research and writing course. The student learns to draft wills, contracts, pleadings, discovery plans, discovery, closing arguments to a jury, legislation, client letters, demand letters, settlement proposals, tactical memoranda, and more. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575

This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.  Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters.  Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation.  In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study.  Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class.  Priority is given to students who are required to take this course. 

Local Government Law (3) Law-7576

A study of the powers of local government with attention to both general principles and California law.  Topics include the organization and operation of local government, the police power, public participation an access to information (including the Brown Act, initiatives and referendums, and public records), eminent domain, redevelopment, annexation and political geography, local government finance, particular school district issues, and intergovernmental relationships.  Students taking this course should supplement it with Land Use Regulation which covers the land use regulatory powers of local government.  This course will be valuable not only to those who wish to represent local governments but also those who will represent private sector clients interacting with local government officials.  

This course is an elective for the Certificate for Environment, Land Use and Real Estate Law. This course will satisfy the Substantial Writing Requirement.

Mediation (3) Law-7581

This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. 

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330

The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators.  While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases.  

The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace.  The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers.  The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning.  Students will be graded on full participation in the mediation clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate. 

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mergers and Acquisitions (3) Law-7580

This is an in-depth review of the process, players, documentation, laws, rules and regulations governing the purchase, sale and combination of business entities.  Particular attention will be paid to the practical implications of certain acquisition strategies and the legal interpretation/implications of key document provisions.   Students will become familiar with the mergers and acquisitions process from initial feasibility analysis through closing of the transaction, as well as post-closing implications of certain strategic decisions by key players.  Upon completion of the course, students will have a basic familiarity with the steps required to conduct a business acquisition and/or combination and the significant legal documents which form an integral part of that process. 

This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830

This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors.  The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined.  Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. 

This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time. This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816

Practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations.  Discussion of negotiations theory, strategy, communications skills, and ethical issues.  Students negotiate several different types of situations, both transactional and in anticipation of litigation. Students research the problems to be negotiated, and prepare various written products, which may include drafting a contract, evaluations of each negotiation, and/or  a final analytical paper discussing some aspect of the negotiations process.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. 

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Patent Prosecution and Licensing (2) Law-7858

This course focuses on the process referred to as “patent prosecution,” which is the exchange of communications between an applicant for a patent (typically represented by a registered patent attorney) and a patent examiner in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  The course will begin with an explanation of PTO procedure and the highlighting of new, expedited prosecution strategies such as Prioritized Examination (“PE”) and First Action Interview (FAI).  These procedures will be contrasted with normal prosecution protocol which requires typically 3-4 years for a patent to issue.  The drafting and amendment of patent claims will be an important aspect of the course, as well as pre-appellate strategies.  Patent licensing and foreign patent filing strategies will be touched up as time permits.

Recommended Prerequisites: Patents and Trade Secrets; Intellectual Property Law.

Practice Foundation Transactions (3) Law-7657

The goal of this course is to introduce students to transactional law practice by exploring the role of lawyers in executing business-related transactions.  This course will provide students with a foundation in transactional practice by developing both the knowledge and skills needed to successfully handle transactions on behalf of clients.  Students will learn how to draft documents to reflect the negotiated elements of a deal. Students also will be introduced to the process of negotiating transactions as well advising clients. Students will gain experience identifying client objectives, understanding the business context of matters, spotting legal and business issues, evaluating options, learning the elements of common business transactions, and implementing a course of action to achieve their client’s objectives.  The course employs a hands-on approach to teaching transactional law.  Students will draft documents, engage in simulations, participate in negotiations, and prepare for and reflect on their work product. These exercises will help cultivate the habits and values necessary to build a successful practice.  Prior to classes, students will be required to complete reading assignments and submit written exercises which will be the basis of in-class exercises and class discussion.  Students will set goals for themselves and will receive on-going feedback on both their performance in the exercises and their written submissions.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)         

This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings.  Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Psychology of Conflict Resolution (3) Law-7333

Lawyers and their clients often get caught up with negative emotions, such as anger and fear, that undermine their ability to engage in effective problem-solving. This course offers a powerful framework to help students develop an understanding of the emotional and psychological dynamics of conflict and to learn inter-personal skills that will help them work through conflict constructively.  There are both intra-personal and inter-personal components to the course.  This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of their own emotions, judgments and biases, and of how their unconscious “default” communication styles create and exacerbate conflict.  The course also offers prescriptive strategies for working through emotionally charged situations with others. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with course techniques through in-class and out-of-class exercises. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, students must be open and willing to examine their own behavior and motivations and to experiment with new ways of communicating with others. 

This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Real Estate Tax Planning JD (2) Law-7884

Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Property I, & Property II.  Taxation of Business Organization is recommended.

Real Estate Transactions (3) Law-7870

A study of various aspects of real estate transactions and financing. Topics may include contracts of sale, brokerage, buyer-seller rights and obligations, title insurance, development, commercial leasing, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, foreclosure, receivership, priorities, subordination, suretyship, securitization, tax considerations, and strategies of negotiation and drafting.

This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested        

This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636

This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies.  Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law.  This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time. 

Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required. Enrollment is limited to third and fourth year law students.

Sports Law (3) Law-7829

 This course will cover selected legal issues in amateur and professional sports including player draft and option systems; labor and employment relations in professional sports; eligibility and discipline issues; agents and player representation; inter-league disputes; buying and moving teams; sex discrimination in sports; and Olympic competition.

This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate.

Tax Exempt Organizations JD (2) Law-7901

An examination of the federal income tax aspects of forming, operating and terminating tax exempt organizations, including the qualification rules, the unrelated business income tax, the restrictions with respect to private inurement, lobbying and political activities, and the private foundation rules.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Tax Procedure & Administration JD (3) Law – 7609 

A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Tax Procedure and Administration Clinic (1) Law-7612

The clinical component of the Tax Procedure and Administration course allows students to handle actual tax controversy cases for low income taxpayers on a pro bono basis before the IRS and in U.S. Tax Court under special rules of student practice.  Students learn the practical application of tax procedures and handle all aspects of their cases, including trial if necessary. 

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and concurrent enrollment in Tax Procedure and Administration. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617

This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial.  It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials.  The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Evidence. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course.  Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list. 

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested                                                                                                           

This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)  

Law Review Law-7860

The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Scholarly Writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor.  Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members receive one graded unit of academic credit in the second semester that they have served on the staff; and, thereafter, 2) editors may each receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school.  In addition, each Staff Editor [2L's] enroll in Directed Research during the semester that they are writing a student note for up to three (3) units.

Nexus Journal Law-7867

Nexus is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students.  The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life.  Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and, 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester.  The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy the writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor.  This course may satisfy either the Substantial Writing requirement OR the Practical Writing Requirement.

Skills Competitions Law-7861

Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education.  Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism.  Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiation, Mediation, Representation in Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional or national level of competition, or three units for Arbitration, Trial, and Appellate competitions outside the law school.  This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum.  Only Appellate Moot Court Competitions (or other competitions requiring a substantial written brief) may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.

+-Fall 2013 (LL.M.)

Corporate Tax I (3) Law-7613

The basic federal income tax consequences to regular corporations and their shareholders of incorporations, capital contributions, corporate operations, dividend and other distributions, stock dividends, redemptions and liquidations, the accumulated earnings tax, and the personal holding company tax.  S corporation taxation will also be briefly discussed.

Criminal Procedure: Practice and Professionalism (2) Law-8023

This course is designed to give the students the skills and information litigators need to know when they appear in court.  Students will understand how to independently handle misdemeanor filings, pre trial negotiations, motions, felony preliminary hearings and misdemeanor jury trials.  This course is designed to prepare you for your spring semester externship by providing an understanding of criminal terminology, common penal and evidence code sections, and the most common type of jury trials that you will likely handle including domestic violence and driving under the influence.  At the conclusion of the semester, the students will have been exposed to a wide variety of topics that they are likely to encounter in their externship placements.

Divorce Taxation (1) Law-7892

An examination of the tax issues that must be considered in representing a divorcing or divorced client, including alimony and child support rules, pension issues, tax aspects of dealing with residences, business interests and other property, and the innocent spouse provisions, as well as a review of estate planning issues.

Estate and Gift Taxation – LL.M (3) Law-7833 

A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.   

Estate Planning High Net Worth Individuals (1) Law-7836

A discussion of current techniques for reducing the transfer tax burden for estates of high net worth individuals.  Prerequisite: Estate & Gift Taxation.

Income Tax for LL.M Students (3) Law-7618

This course presumes some familiarity with the federal income tax.  The course will focus on (1) the taxation of property transactions and related tax shelter issues, and (2) principles of tax accounting.  Topics covered will include realization and recognition, non recognition transactions such as like-kind exchanges and involuntary conversions, transactions involving debt, depreciation and amortization, capital gains and losses (and related issues such as depreciation recapture), loss limitation rules and the alternative minimum tax, accounting periods, accounting methods, installment sales, time value of money rules (original issue discount and related rules), and the relationship between tax and financial accounting. 

This course may not be taken by J.D. students. 

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101

Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Preliminary Hearings (2) Law-8022

This course focuses on specialized, advanced topics in advocacy, and specifically on putting on and defending felony preliminary hearings in California. It is open only to students who will be serving as an extern or LLM-trial advocacy lawyer in Spring 2010. Units of study will include the timing of the hearing, the role of the defendant at the hearing, limitations on the right to a public hearing, the holding order, evidentiary rules at the hearing, and superior court review of the magistrate’s decision.

Real Estate Tax Planning (2) Law-7885

Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisites: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students; Partnership Tax.

Tax Exempt Organizations LL.M. (2) Law-7616

An examination of the federal income tax aspects of forming, operating and terminating tax exempt organizations, including the qualification rules, the unrelated business income tax, the restrictions with respect to private inurement, lobbying and political activities, and the private foundation rules. 

Tax Procedure and Admin – LL.M (3) Law-7619

A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties.

+-Spring 2013

Required Courses – First Year J.D. Course Descriptions

Civil Procedure II (2 units)
This course is a continuation of the two-semester first year year requirement, providing an introduction to the court system, including jurisdiction over the person, venue, and the role of state law in federal courts. The course also covers aspects of civil litigation, including pleading, discovery, parties, counterclaims, cross-claims, impleader, intervention, and interpleader.

Contracts II (3 units)
This course is a continuation of the two-semester first year year requirement, providing a study of the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law, selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts, and selected portions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Areas of concentration include the bargaining process (offer and acceptance); consideration and other bases for enforcing  promises; the Statute of Frauds; capacity to contract; policing the agreement; unenforceability on grounds of public policy; the parol evidence rule and other rules of contract interpretation; performance and nonperformance; remedies; excuses for nonperformance (including mistake, misrepresentation, duress, impracticability, and frustration of purpose); assignment and delegation; rights of third parties; and other topics.

Criminal Law (3 units)
This course is designed to enable law students to deal with substantive criminal law problems in both practical and policy terms.  There is inquiry into the proper scope and objectives of the criminal law, limitations on the State’s power to define criminal liability, and general principles of liability and defenses for offenses against the person and property.  The course also provides an opportunity for critical examination of statutes at an early stage in the law student’s career. 

Legal Research and Writing II (2 units)
This course is a continuation of the two-semester first year year requirement, introducing students to fundamental legal reasoning, research, and writing skills in the context of objective legal documents, including client letters and memoranda of law. The first semester (I) includes an overview of legal concepts, such as the structure of the court system and how law is made. The second semester (II) helps students refine and further develop their analytical, writing, and research skills in the advocacy context.  Students produce litigation documents including pleadings and either a pre-trial brief or an appellate brief. Students are introduced to computer assisted legal research.

Real Property II (3 units)
This course is a continuation of the two-semester first year year requirement. It is studied as a social and legal institution to facilitate the acquisition, disposition, and use of personal and real property.  Over two semesters, students explore a variety of rights and responsibilities in property, including distinctions between real and personal property, the nature of ownership and possession, adverse possession, landlord-tenant law, present and future estates in land, concurrent ownership, conveyancing and deeds, recording, private land-use restrictions (easements, covenants, and equitable servitudes), public land-use regulations, and eminent domain. The course may include introductory exposure to trusts, donative transfers, intellectual property, fixtures, mortgages, and ownership of natural resources (i.e., water, oil, gas, wildlife).

Torts II (3 units)
This course is a continuation of the two-semester first year year requirement, covering the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property.  The course emphasizes intentional, negligent, and strict liability torts. Students become familiar with the fundamental principles and objectives of tort law including the basic rules governing the legal assessment of fault, victim compensation, and defenses.  Products liability, defamation, invasion of privacy, selected business torts, and other alternatives to negligence may be explored. 

Upper Level J.D. Course Descriptions

Advanced Family Violence Clinic (1-2) Law-7629
The Advanced Family Violence Clinic is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic Director.  The Family Violence Clinic Director, Professor Marisa Cianciarulo, will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced Family Violence Clinic student prior to registration.  The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned), but will not exceed two credits.  Advanced Family Violence Clinic students are exempt from the weekly seminar portion of the regular Family Violence Clinic. 

Advanced Family Violence Clinic students represent Orange County victims of domestic violence in applications for domestic-violence related immigration relief and/or domestic violence protection orders or may be involved in legal outreach and related limited representation.  In addition to casework at the AFJC, Advanced Family Violence Clinic students will either meet bi-weekly with clinic faculty on an individual basis for case supervision or weekly with other advanced students and their supervisor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Federal Income Tax (2) Law-7879
This course is a continuation of the basic Federal Income Taxation course for students in the tax law program. It includes federal income tax topics that are not generally addressed in detail or at all in the basic course, such as: in-depth coverage of tax accounting issues, imputation under IRC section 7872, involuntary conversions, alternative minimum tax, “kiddie tax”, employee benefits and deferred compensation (including IRC section 83) and tax law policy issues.  This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803
Following a review of basic research procedures, with emphasis on primary source materials, bibliographic research is conducted in the areas of legislative materials, including legislative histories, administrative materials and sources of the law.  Emphasis is placed on the availability and use of treatises, forms, records and briefs, microforms and other materials used in practice.   This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation.  Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience.  Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others.  There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic.  Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Advanced Seminar: International Law (2) Law-7845
Critiques of International Legal Order (2 units) This seminar examines critiques of international law.  Students will explore critical legal theory, global south, critical race, gender studies, and rationalist/neo-sovereigntist perspectives on international law, international organizations, and their function and legitimacy.  Potential themes include human rights, business and finance law, constitutional ordering, environmental law, and laws of war.  Emphasizing student-led discussions, the seminar is comprised of three parts: readings, research and writing, and student-paper presentations.  Prerequisite: International Law or International Business Transactions (completed or concurrent enrollment) or Instructor approval. This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement and the writing requirement of the International Law Emphasis. 

Advanced Topic: Municipal Ordinances (3) Law-7656
In this course, students will learn how to navigate, analyze, and interpret county and city laws/ordinances. Students will have the opportunity to work with real city ordinances and will be provided with actual draft ordinances authored by municipal attorneys. Classes will consist of reviewing and in some instances revising  draft ordinances to determine and/or address the potential impacts of the ordinance on property owners, neighborhood associations, business groups and other stakeholders. Students will be exposed to a wide range of municipal issues ranging from backyard chicken keeping to the regulation and control of big box retail stores and cell towers.  This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Agency and Partnership (3) Law-7507 - California Bar Tested
The principles of master-servant, principal-agent, and general employer-independent contractor agency relationships are explored in this course.  Subjects include relationship creation and termination, the scope of the agents= real and apparent authority; disclosed and undisclosed principals, ratification; agent fiduciary duties; applicability to partnerships; the doctrine of respondent superior, and employer-employee relations.  Materials cover statutory and case law differentiating the general partnership from the limited partnership and internal/external rights, duties, and liabilities, including creditor remedies.  Discussion includes such topics as limited liability companies, not-for-profit organizations, and joint ventures.

Appellate Tax Clinic (1-2) Law-7642
This course offers the opportunity for students to participate in actual appellate tax cases conducted under the auspices of The Center for Fair Administration of Taxation.  Students enrolled in the course may participate as amicus curiae in significant matters of federal, state or local tax law. Students conduct research on legal issues, draft appellate briefs, and depending on the jurisdiction of the court and the nature of the case, present their brief before an appellate court.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax, Civil Procedure, top 40% class rank and permission of professor.  Students should submit a resume in advance. Enrollment limited to clinic current case-load (typically 2-4 students.)  Registration allowed only with prior approval.  May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part II (3) Law-7805
This advanced course will cover both individual and business reorganizations in Chapter 11, including assumption and rejection of leases and other executory contracts, preparation of disclosure statements, and negotiation and confirmation of plans.  Students will be expected to engage in role-playing exercise to simulate the competing interests of debtor, unsecured creditors and secured creditors in the reorganization effort. Prerequisite: Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice Part I.

Business Planning (2) Law-7515
The goal of this course, through reviewing actual documents and agreements (and through class discussion), is to have students become familiar with certain legal and business relationships/issues raised in documents, business agreements and other contracts -- from a practical (real life) perspective.  Generally, class discussions track the formation, growth and eventual sale of a California business.  We begin by analyzing and comparing different business entity structures. We then examine the relationship and conflicting motivations of owners, officers and employees of the business.  With the growth of the business, we move to a review of the various interactions a business has with its consultants, employees, venture investors, banks and vendors.  We end the course with an examination of the eventual merger/acquisition of the business.  Practical problems and solutions are the focus of this course.  It is intended to provide an important component of preparing students who will be advising and/or interacting with California businesses.  May satisfy either the Lawyering Skills or Practical Writing requirement with faculty approval; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

California Civil Procedure (2) Law-7817 California Bar Tested
This course continues the study of civil procedure with advanced focus on California's procedural structure, including ways in which California procedure differs from federal civil practice.  Areas of study include state practice in complex civil litigation, discovery, pleading, summary judgment, former adjudication and other advanced principles.  Students will be expected to analyze complex fact patterns and to discern the ways in which California procedure differs from federal practice. 

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics:  relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court.  The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.California Evidence with Judge Steiner:  Mandatory attendance (for a morning or afternoon session at any point during the semester) at one trial or other court proceeding in Judge Steiner's courtroom is required.  The final class of the semester is accordingly canceled.

Commercial Leasing (2) Law-7521
This course introduces students to one of the most important areas of real estate practice: commercial lease law and negotiation. Students are required to master elements of legal substance and theory concerning the leasing of commercial property, as well as methods of practice and negotiation. In addition to studying sophisticated commercial leases, case opinions, and other textual materials, students draft and revise provisions of commercial leases, and ultimately, negotiate an entire lease transaction. Strongly recommended: successful completion of Real Estate Transactions and Finance.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court.  Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients.  Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law.  The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation.  Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney.  Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products,  including a client letter, a  memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client.     This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: the Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement.  Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor.  If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested
California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states, and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well.  This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction.  Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Conflict of Laws (3) Law-7527
This course examines how courts resolve disputes in cases involving parties, conduct, or transactions that are connected to more than one state or country. After reviewing the law of personal jurisdiction, the course will focus on how courts determine which law governs a multi-jurisdictional dispute, how constitutional limitations inform such determinations, the rules governing the enforcement of interstate and foreign judgments, and the law that applies to seemingly ubiquitous Internet transactions.

Constitutional Law I and II (3/3) Law-7127 and Law-7129 California Bar Tested
These courses cover the powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, as well as selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States.

Copyright Law (3) Law-7822
This course offers an in-depth analysis of the rights and remedies afforded to copyright owners under U.S. law.  Although we will discuss theoretical aspects of copyright law, we will also engage in a number of practical exercises such as preparing mock copyright registrations, client letters, legal memoranda, and licensing agreements.  Work prepared for those practical exercises will apply toward satisfying the course’s writing requirement. 

Corporate Stock & Asset Acquisition (2) Law-7898
This course is the JD approved version of Corporate Tax II.
Students will study advanced topics not generally covered in the Taxation of Business Organizations course. Topics include tax-free reorganizations, acquisitive reorganizations, and carryover of corporate tax attributes, including net operation losses. (Designated as “Corporate Tax II” in the LL.M. program). Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax, Advanced Federal Income Tax, and Taxation of Business Organizations.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for‑profit corporations.  Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate.  The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers.  The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.

Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) Law-7303
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance, bail, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury proceedings, preliminary hearing, joinder and severance of offenses and defendants, right to speedy trial, guilty pleas, discovery, trial by jury, publicity, double jeopardy, and post-conviction.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation.  Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination. 

Directed Research (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings.  To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing.  The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required.  The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester.  Students cannot register for  a Directed Research project online.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project.  With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practice Oriented writing requirement.   One course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.   Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements.

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of  older adults.  The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly.  In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings.   The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients.  The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice.   Enrollment is limited to 14 students.  Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure; willingness to become a Certified Law Student.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers.  Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films.  Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC;  acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases.  Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.  This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Estate and Gift Tax – JD (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.   

Estate Planning - JD (2) Law-7837
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance.  The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents, such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests.  Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials.  Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence. 

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654)
Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7588), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654).  Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills.  For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN (http://lawschool.westlaw.com/manage/homepage.asp?courseid=33468).

Externships can be taken for 3, 4, or 5 units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units.  (Law firm externships can be taken for 1 or 2 units, only). An externship of at least 3 units

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 2 weeks before the start of the semester.  Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above).  If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within 1 week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements.  The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times.   Externships of at least 3 units  will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families.  Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by US Citizenship and Immigration Services.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Protection Order students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence in court on applications for protective orders in Orange County Superior Court, Family Division.  FVC students also advise pro per applicants for restraining orders before they appear in court on their own for domestic violence hearings.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, direct and cross examination, entering exhibits in court, and related trial skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two or three for case supervision.  FVC-Protection Order students must be enrolled in or have taken Evidence.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.    

Federal Tax Research – JD (2) Law-7889
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. Such material is often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores the fundamentals of tax research and is also an extensive survey of tax research sources and techniques, accompanied by several writing assignments.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  This course is an elective for the Certificate in Taxation.

First Amendment Law (3) Law-7325
This course is a study of the fundamental freedoms of speech, press, association, and religion. In addition to considering the historical background, the course focuses on specific challenges in First Amendment jurisprudence, including regulation of speech in a public forum, access to the media, regulation of the press, symbolic expression, libel, obscenity, commercial speech, picketing, right of association, loyalty oaths, legislative investigations and government demands for information, separation of church and state, free exercise of religion, state aid to religious schools, and regulation of religion-based conduct. This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.

Gambling Law Seminar (3) Law-7306
This course covers the law and policy of regulating gambling, one of the fastest growing segments of the entertainment industry. The course will examine the history and current development of, as well as possible future changes to, gambling regulation in California, the United States, and other parts of the world.  Topics discussed will include casino gambling, lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering, sports-betting, Indian gaming, and Internet gambling.  This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. 

Gender & Sexual Orientation & the Law (2)
This two-unit course explores how the law deals with differences between women and men, how societal beliefs about gender norms and sexuality influence the law and vice versa, and how gender and sexual orientation-related issues affect us in our personal and professional lives. We will critically examine government regulation of several aspects of life, including sexuality and privacy, same-sex coupling, gender and parenting rights, expression of sexual identities, hate violence and criminal “justice,” and sexuality and gender in the U.S. military. Readings will include court cases, historical documents, and scholarly essays on gender equality in the United States.  Each student will prepare a final research paper instead of a final exam. This course is offered approximately every other year. There are no prerequisites for this subject. This course allows the optional production of a paper that will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Income Taxation of Trusts, Estates and Beneficiaries – JD  (2) Law-7899
The federal income taxation of trusts, estates and beneficiaries, including the determination of taxable income and tax liability, distributable net income, distributions, income in respect of a decedent and other income tax issues resulting from the death of a decedent, grantor trusts, foreign trusts and charitable trusts.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

International Law (2) Law-7558
This is the introductory course in international law, covering the nature and sources of international law and its major developments. This course introduces students to the basic law of the international organizational system, including the United Nations and UN specialized agencies. The course introduces concepts of international law and how they achieve legitimacy in the international system through United Nations organizations and conferences, the International Court of Justice, the International Law Commission, treaty bodies, and state practice. The law of foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine are considered along with the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues.  Students will have the option to write a substantial paper to satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement in lieu of the final exam.  This course counts for the International Law Emphasis Requirement and the required Public International Law Class for the Emphasis.

International Trade Law (3) Law-7556
In this course we will examine the trade commitments that countries have made under the World Trade Organization (WTO), with emphasis on the United States' participation. As part of the course, we will discuss some basic provisions of the central treaty, General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (GATT), as well as some specific agreements, including, briefly, Agreement on Trade-related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs). We will also consider exceptions to trade commitments, such as environmental and public health exceptions

Land Use Regulation (3) Law-7626
This course examines the government regulation of land use and development. It is a course in applied constitutional, administrative, and property law. The material covers land use planning, zoning, advanced and flexible zoning mechanisms, subdivision controls, constitutional and state law constraints on regulation, the economics and politics of land development, growth controls, the environmental regulation of land use and ecosystems, and alternatives to regulation. Students are exposed to business decision making, public problem solving, regulatory permitting, and social science analyses.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504
This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery.  The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems.  Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year students and is by application only.  Applications must be submitted to the Director of Bar Services, Professor Mario Mainero, at mmainero@chapman.edu by November 11, 2012.  Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.  However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them. 

Legal & Business Affairs in Hollywood (3) Law-7352
An overview of the primary areas of practice in which a lawyer and/or business affairs executive engage at a typical Hollywood studio throughout all phases of development, production, marketing and distribution of theatrical motion pictures.  Emphasis will be placed on the business aspects in each of these areas and the economics of the various revenues streams exploited in such distribution.  Deal structures will be taught for the customary transactions entered into for both “in-house” productions as well as films financed and/or produced by third parties but distributed by the studio (i.e. acquisitions, negative pick-ups, co-productions, split rights arrangements, etc.) as well as studio deals with financial partners to lay off economic risk. The course will conclude with an exercise in which the students will select a motion picture slate made up of various genres, cast and deal models they will select based upon the project elements of actual (but anonymous) Hollywood studio productions.  The success of those slates will then be projected as revealed by the actual performance of the movies from which those elements were taken.

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.  Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters.  Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation.  In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study.  Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class.  Priority is given to students who are required to take this course. 

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators.  While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases.  

The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace.  The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers.  The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning.  Students will be graded on full participation in the Mediation Clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mergers and Acquisitions (3) Law-7580
This course will operate largely as an interactive seminar, built around “hands on” negotiating and drafting experience in a hypothetical merger and acquisition transaction.   The first part of the course will cover various topics that are important to M&A transactions, including directors’ duties, shareholder voting and dissenters’ rights, Federal securities laws, income taxation and accounting, valuation, and trade regulation. Then the course will analyze the primary forms of acquisition (merger, sale of assets, sale of stock), and the basic differences between M&A transactions involving public and private corporations.  The remainder of the course will focus upon the M&A case studies, including extensive participation, in teams of “buyers” and “sellers”, in the negotiating and drafting process in a typical M&A transaction.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors.  The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined.  Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time.  This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations.  Discussion of negotiations theory, strategy, communications skills, and ethical issues.  Students negotiate several different types of situations, both transactional and in anticipation of litigation.  Students research the problems to be negotiated, and prepare various written products, which may include drafting a contract, evaluations of each negotiation, and/or  a final analytical paper discussing some aspect of the negotiations process.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Patents and Trade Secrets (2) Law-7815
This course offers an in-depth exploration of the role of patents as valuable assets to businesses and individuals and the purpose and function of patent claims.  Standards for patentability and patent infringement are studied, as well as the intersection of patents and trade secrets.  The course requires completion of a few practical exercises such as patent searching, claim drafting, preparing a patentability opinion, a student invention and the preparation of a provisional patent application.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)
This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings.  Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing – JD (2) Law-7882
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP) and stock bonus plans and their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions.  Prerequisite:  Federal Income Taxation.  Recommended: Advanced Federal Income Taxation.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies

Securities Regulation (3) Law-7606
This course covers the federal regulation of the distribution and sale of stocks and other securities as a means of financing business operations.  Students will closely examine the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  The course will explore such topics as the definition and nature of securities; the registration and sale of securities to investors; exemptions from registration for public and private offerings; the philosophy of mandatory disclosure rules; the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission; the role of underwriters; civil and criminal liability of corporate issuers, directors, and officers for fraud and manipulation of securities markets; the regulation of brokers and dealers; and the unique professional responsibilities of attorneys who practice in the securities field.  It is recommended that students successfully complete Corporations prior to this course. 

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies.  Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law.  This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time.  Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.  Enrollment is limited to third and fourth year law students.

Sports Law (3) Law-7829
This course will cover selected legal issues in amateur and professional sports including player draft and option systems; labor and employment relations in professional sports; eligibility and discipline issues; agents and player representation; inter-league disputes; buying and moving teams; sex discrimination in sports; and Olympic competition.

State & Local Taxation - JD (2) Law-7900
A survey of state and local taxation issues, including income, sales/use, property and so-called corporate franchise taxes; constitutional limits on state and local taxation with respect to uniformity, equality and interstate commerce; assessment and collection procedures; and taxpayer remedies.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax. 

Tax Exempt Organizations - JD (2) Law-7901
An examination of the federal income tax aspects of forming, operating and terminating tax exempt organizations, including the qualification rules, the unrelated business income tax, the restrictions with respect to private inurement, lobbying and political activities, and the private foundation rules. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Taxation of Business Organizations - JD (3) Law-7608
Problems in the taxation of subchapter K partnerships, subchapter C corporations, and subchapter S corporations are covered by this course.  Topics pertaining to partnership taxation include the formation, operation, and termination of general and limited partnerships.  Class discussion is held concerning the definition of the partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership and the possible treatment of a partnership as an association.  Topics pertaining to corporate taxation include tax treatment of a corporation and a corporate shareholder with respect to corporate formation; organization and property transfers, dividends and distributed income; accumulated earnings and undistributed income; non-liquidating corporate distributions; collapsible corporations; personal holding companies; and sale or liquidation of a corporation.  This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.  This course is also a prerequisite for JD students who wish to enroll in Corporate Stock & Asset Acquisitions and Dispositions.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial.  It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials.  The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination.  Prerequisite: successful completion of Evidence.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - Must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course.  Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list. 

United States Tax Court Clinic (3) Law-7890
Under a special IRS and Tax Court rules of practice, students in this clinical education course are permitted to handle actual cases on a wide variety of tax issues at various stages of exam, appeal, court and collections. Under supervision of Attorney-Professors, students are responsible for all aspects of their cases including meeting with clients, gathering facts and evidence, researching applicable laws, and meeting with the IRS to discuss case in an effort to negotiate a favorable outcome. If the case is for trial, the student normally represents the client in court and completes all post trial work.  This course is an elective option for the Certificate in Taxation.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  (Recommended: Advanced Federal Income Tax, Taxation of Business Organizations.)

U. S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7880
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network.  Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, and the branch profits tax, including the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions.  A briefer discussion of the taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), also exploring the effect of U.S. tax treaties, will introduce topics such as the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, the foreign tax credit, tax provisions related to U.S. exports, transfer pricing, taxation of expatriates, and tax aspects of the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  Recommended: Prior completion of Taxation of Business Organizations.

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested
This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes.  The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing.  The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Substantial Writing requirement OR the Practical Writing Requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor.

Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members may each receive up to two units of academic credit per semester for a total of eight units; and, 2) editors may each receive up to three units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school which, together with credits received as a staff member, may not exceed ten units.

Each Staff Editor [2L's] may enroll in Directed Research in the fall for up to three (3) units. Each Staff Editor shall receive one (1) to two (2) units of academic credits in the spring due to participation on Law Review, not to exceed four (4) total units for the academic year.

The Business Development Editor, Production Editor, Submissions Editor [3L's or 4L's], and each third or fourth year Editor who is not on the Executive Board, may receive up to two (2) credits per semester.  Each of the aforementioned, upon application to the EIC, for good cause may petition the Law Reviews Faculty Advisors for one (1) additional credit per semester for a highly exceptional performance.

It is expected that the EIC, Managing Editor, four Senior Articles Editors, two Seniors Notes & Comments Editors, and the Senior Symposium Editor [3L's or 4L's], upon satisfactory performance of their duties, may apply for and receive up to three (3) credits per semester.  Each of the aforementioned, for good cause, may petition the Law Review’s Faculty Advisors for one (1) additional credit per semester for a highly exceptional performance.

Nexus Journal Law-7867
Nexus
is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students.  The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life.  Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and, 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester.  May satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement or the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement.

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education.  Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism.  Students may earn one unit of credit for in-house trial or appellate competitions, or for the International Arbitration Competition.  Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiations and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional level of competition, or three units for trial and appellate competitions outside the law school.  No student may participate for credit in more than one external competition during a semester.  This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum.  Only Moot Court Competitions may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief. 

LL.M. Course Descriptions

Advanced Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) LL.M. TAP course Law-7351
(Pat Ahle, Anaheim City Attorney’s Office)
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance; bail, prosecutorial discretion; grand jury proceedings; preliminary hearings; joinder and severance of offenses and defendants; right to speedy trial; guilty pleas; discovery; trial by jury; publicity; double jeopardy; and post-conviction remedies and in depth analysis of numerous actual criminal trials. 

Corporate Tax II (2) Law-7623
The federal income tax consequences of taxable and tax-free stock and asset acquisitions and dispositions, including reorganizations, consolidations and corporate divisions; the carryover and survival of net operating losses and other corporate attributes; and the acquisition of loss corporations.  Prerequisite: Corporate Tax I.

Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Estate Planning (2) Law-7838
A basic LL.M. level estate planning course, looking at both small and large estates, with consideration of lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property, the use of the marital and charitable bequests, and the use of life insurance.  The course will look at the drafting and use of estate planning documents, such as wills, inter vivos trusts, insurance trusts, living wills and durable powers of attorney and provide an overview of special issues for estates including substantial closely held business interests.  Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

Ethics in Tax Practice (2) Law-7887
An examination of the statutory, regulatory and ethical standards governing those who practice in the tax field, including the application of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to tax practice, Circular 230 (governing those admitted to practice before the Internal Revenue Service), and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and the Treasury Regulations governing return preparers, with lesser attention to provisions governing CPAs and other federal statutes, such as the federal conflict of interest statute.  Among the areas covered are advertising and solicitation, return preparation and advice, dealing with the Internal Revenue Service in the audit and appeals process, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and uncooperative clients.

Federal Tax Research (2) Law-7888
An area often ignored in traditional legal research courses is the array of materials dealing with tax matters. Such material is often separated from other library materials, and many practicing attorneys possess little ability to research tax matters for their clients. This course explores the fundamentals of tax research and is also an extensive survey of tax research sources and techniques, accompanied by several writing assignments.

Income Taxation of Trusts, Estates and Beneficiaries (2) Law-7839
The federal income taxation of trusts, estates and beneficiaries, including the determination of taxable income and tax liability, distributable net income, distributions, income in respect of a decedent and other income tax issues resulting from the death of a decedent, grantor trusts, foreign trusts and charitable trusts. Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Partnership Tax (3) Law-7886
The federal income taxation of partnerships and entities taxed as partnerships, such as limited liability companies, including entity classification rules, partnership capital accounts, tax accounting rules, partnership operations, partner contributions, distributions, allocation rules, dispositions of partnership interests, partnership terminations, taxation of service partners and basis adjustments.  Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

Qualified Pension and Profit Sharing – LL.M (2) Law-7883
An examination of the federal income tax rules and related labor law rules for qualified pension, profit-sharing, employee stock ownership (ESOP) and stock bonus plans and their participants and beneficiaries, including reporting and disclosure requirements, preemption, coverage and participation requirements, vesting rules, limitations on benefits and contributions, the taxation of distributions, minimum distribution rules, limits on participant loans, fiduciary responsibilities, and prohibited transactions.  Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students.

State & Local Taxation (2) Law-7607
A survey of state and local taxation issues, including income, sales/use, property and so-called corporate franchise taxes; constitutional limits on state and local taxation with respect to uniformity, equality and interstate commerce; assessment and collection procedures; and taxpayer remedies.

U. S. Taxation of International Income (3) Law-7881 
An introduction to the U.S. taxation of international transactions, with consideration of policy and jurisdictional issues involved in the U.S. international tax laws and the U.S. tax treaty network.  Topics covered will include source of income rules, taxation of foreign persons with passive U.S. investments, taxation of foreign persons operating a U.S. trade or business, taxation of foreign-owned U.S. real property interests, and the branch profits tax, including the effect of U.S. tax treaties on such “inbound” transactions.  A briefer discussion of the taxation of “outbound” transactions (foreign activities of U.S. persons), also exploring the effect of U.S. tax treaties, will introduce topics such as the U.S. taxation of worldwide income of U.S. citizens and residents, the foreign tax credit, tax provisions related to U.S. exports, transfer pricing, taxation of expatriates, and tax aspects of the exploitation of intangible property rights abroad. Prerequisite: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students; Corporate Tax I.

Valuation for Tax & Estate Planning (2) Law-7843
A detailed examination of issues in valuing both fee simple and partial interests in tangible property, in patents, trademarks, copyrights and the like, and in corporations, partnerships and other entities. The primary emphasis will be on transfer tax valuation, including special provisions such as chapter 14 and sections 2032A and 2057 of the Internal Revenue Code; buy-sell agreements and transfer restrictions; blockage, marketability and minority discounts; control premiums; actuarial valuation; and the use of appraisals. The course will also look at current planning techniques designed to reduce the value of property for transfer tax purposes and at valuation issues in the context of charitable contribution deductions. Prerequisite: Estate and Gift Taxation.

+-Fall 2012

Required Courses – First Year J.D. Course Descriptions

Civil Procedure I (3 units)

This course provides an introduction to the court system, including jurisdiction over the person, venue, and the role of state law in federal courts. The course also covers aspects of civil litigation, including pleading, discovery, parties, counterclaims, cross-claims, impleader, intervention, and interpleader.

Contracts I (3 units)

A study of the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law, selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts, and selected portions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Areas of concentration include the bargaining process (offer and acceptance); consideration and other bases for enforcing  promises; the Statute of Frauds; capacity to contract; policing the agreement; unenforceability on grounds of public policy; the parol evidence rule and other rules of contract interpretation; performance and nonperformance; remedies; excuses for nonperformance (including mistake, misrepresentation, duress, impracticability, and frustration of purpose); assignment and delegation; rights of third parties; and other topics.

Legal Research and Writing I (3 units)

This first course (I) introduces students to fundamental legal reasoning, research, and writing skills in the context of objective legal documents, including client letters and memoranda of law. The course includes an overview of legal concepts, such as the structure of the court system and how law is made. The second course (II) helps students refine and further develop their analytical, writing, and research skills in the advocacy context.  Students produce litigation documents including pleadings and either a pre-trial brief or an appellate brief. Students are introduced to computer assisted legal research.

Real Property I
Property law is studied as a social and legal institution to facilitate the acquisition, disposition, and use of personal and real property.  Over two semesters, students explore a variety of rights and responsibilities in property, including distinctions between real and personal property, the nature of ownership and possession, adverse possession, landlord-tenant law, present and future estates in land, concurrent ownership, conveyancing and deeds, recording, private land-use restrictions (easements, covenants, and equitable servitudes), public land-use regulations, and eminent domain. The course may include introductory exposure to trusts, donative transfers, intellectual property, fixtures, mortgages, and ownership of natural resources (i.e., water, oil, gas, wildlife).

Torts I (3 units) 
This course covers the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property.  The course emphasizes intentional, negligent, and strict liability torts. Students become familiar with the fundamental principles and objectives of tort law including the basic rules governing the legal assessment of fault, victim compensation, and defenses.  Products liability, defamation, invasion of privacy, selected business torts, and other alternatives to negligence may be explored. 

Upper Level J.D. Course Descriptions

Administrative Law (3) Law-7503
This course provides a study of the processes of decision making by administrative agencies and their control by legislators and courts. It centers on the tension between the need for delegation of power to agencies sufficient to ensure effective government, and the need to limit that power and protect the citizen from government oppression. The course focuses particularly on administrative procedure and deals with the concept of administrative discretion and the constitutional, statutory, and common law doctrines that control discretion in administrative decision making. Also considered are contemporary issues that bear upon the fairness of governmental action (e.g., the right to notice and hearing, confrontation of witnesses, ex parte communications, institutional decisions, and combination of functions).

Advanced Family Violence Clinic (1-2) Law-7629
The Advanced Family Violence Clinic is a semester-long, graded clinic open to students who have successfully completed the Family Violence Clinic and who have been approved for enrollment by the Family Violence Clinic Director.  The Family Violence Clinic Director, Professor Marisa Cianciarulo, will determine how many credits to allocate to each Advanced Family Violence Clinic student prior to registration.  The credit allocation will reflect the amount of anticipated work to be completed by the student (based on the nature and status of the case(s) or work to which the student will be assigned), but will not exceed two credits.  Advanced Family Violence Clinic students are exempt from the weekly seminar portion of the regular Family Violence Clinic.  

Advanced Family Violence Clinic students represent Orange County victims of domestic violence in applications for domestic-violence related immigration relief and/or domestic violence protection orders or may be involved in legal outreach and related limited representation.  In addition to casework at the AFJC, Advanced Family Violence Clinic students will either meet bi-weekly with clinic faculty on an individual basis for case supervision or weekly with other advanced students and their supervisor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Legal Research (2) Law-7803
Following a review of basic research procedures, with emphasis on primary source materials, bibliographic research is conducted in the areas of legislative materials, including legislative histories, administrative materials and sources of the law.  Emphasis is placed on the availability and use of treatises, forms, records and briefs, microforms and other materials used in practice.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation.  Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience.  Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others.  There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic.  Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. Registration allowed only with prior approval from Professor Dowling. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Advanced Seminar: Natural Resources (3) Law 7807
An advanced study of legal and public policy issues surrounding the use and conservation of one or more natural resources, including public lands, timber, livestock forage, minerals, energy, wildlife, or water.  Legal analysis will be informed by insights from other disciplines.  This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.

Advanced Topic: Fundamentals of In-House Corporate Practice (2) Law-7854
This is a practical skills course in practicing as an In-House Corporate Lawyer that introduces students to the fundamentals of working effectively in a high-functioning corporate law department and prepares them for a career as an In-House Corporate Counsel.  The course will cover the structure and mechanics of corporate legal departments; leadership, effective communications and the exercise of legal ethics within a commercial organization; the use of business tools and technology; and the in-house approach to managing Intellectual property, labor & employment, significant litigation, regulatory compliance, corporate governance, international operations, outside counsel, contract negotiation and administration, and organizational crisis response.  Students will have the opportunity to perform exercises relating to each of the substantive areas of in-house practice through actual case studies of corporate legal issues, simulating actual assignments as corporate counsel.  Outside reading consists of articles and excerpts of published materials.  Class sessions consist of lecture, class discussion, practical exercises and presentations, with some prominent in-house lawyers and general counsel as guest speakers, and networking opportunities.  The final exam will consist of a write-up on a case study to be assigned on the last day of class and submitted prior to the end of the exam period. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice, Part I (3) Law-7518 
This course will explore adjustment of the debtor/creditor relationship through the federal bankruptcy laws, beginning with background discussion on the history and purpose of insolvency laws and continuing with the sources of both secured and unsecured creditor claims.  The course will cover security interests, attachment and judgment liens, filing of the bankruptcy petition and schedules, the automatic stay, and creation of the estate and discharge.  Chapter 7 liquidation and Chapter 13 wage earner plans will both be explored in depth.  Other subjects explored will be relief of stay, dischargeability litigation and the avoiding powers of the trustee.

Civil Rights Law (3) Law-7519
This course will study the laws and constitutional provisions that protect civil rights, particularly the right to be free from discrimination on the basis of race, sex, national origin, age, disability, and other protected characteristics.  This course will give some consideration to legal actions that seek redress for violations of other federal constitutional or statutory rights.  The course will focus on techniques for constructing or defending against such actions.  This course may satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Scholarly Writing Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested 
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics:  relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court.  The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

California Evidence with Judge Steiner:  Mandatory attendance (for a morning or afternoon session at any point during the semester) at one trial or other court proceeding in Judge Steiner's courtroom is required.  The final class of the semester is accordingly canceled.

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiaebriefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court.  Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients.  Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law.  The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation.  Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney.  Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products,  including a client letter, a  memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Note: the Client Interviewing and Counseling course is taught by different professors who may or may not require papers that would satisfy the Practical Writing requirement.  Students should refer to the Schedule of Classes for a given semester to see if satisfying this requirement is an option depending on the paper requirements by the professor.  If this is an option, students may choose to apply the course towards the Lawyering Skills or the Practical Writing requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested
California is one of nine community property jurisdictions in the United States. Community property law affects the residents of each of these states, and, in the case of migratory clients, persons who move to common law states as well.  This course provides a survey of the peculiar ownership, creditor rights, testamentary rights, and family law problems that may result from even a passing domicile in a community property jurisdiction.  Practical problems and solutions are emphasized.

Constitutional Law I and II (3/3) Law-7127 and Law-7129 California Bar Tested
These courses cover the powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, as well as selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for‑profit corporations.  Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate.  The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers.  The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.

Criminal Procedure/Adjudicative Process (3) Law-7303
This course involves a study of the adjudicative stages of criminal justice: initial appearance, bail, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury proceedings, preliminary hearing, joinder and severance of offenses and defendants, right to speedy trial, guilty pleas, discovery, trial by jury, publicity, double jeopardy, and post-conviction.

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation.  Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.  

Directed Research (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings.  To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing.  The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required.  The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester.  Students cannot register for  a Directed Research project online.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project.  With faculty approval, may satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement OR the Practical Writing requirement.   One course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.   Must be taken for a minimum of 2 credits to satisfy one of the writing requirements.

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of  older adults.  The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly.  In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings.   The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients.  The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice.   Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure; willingness to become a Certified Law Student.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Election and Political Campaign Law (2) Law-7630
This course covers federal, state and local election and political campaign laws, including the Federal Election Campaign Act; California’s Political Reform Act and Elections Code; and local election and campaign laws.  Among the topics to be addressed are First Amendment issues; campaign finance law and campaign reform; voting rights; election administration; the 2000 Presidential election; initiative, referendum and recall matters; political parties; legislative districting; election recounts and contests; ballot access; ethics; conflicts of interest; public integrity; criminal and administrative enforcement issues; and several other topics of interest relating to the political and election process.

Entertainment Law (3) Law-7538 
This course explores legal issues connected with the development, production, and exploitation of entertainment product, focusing predominantly on filmed entertainment and news media, to some extent on musical compositions and recordings, and incidentally on other forms of entertainment. Topics include life story and personality rights (defamation, invasion of privacy, etc.); celebrity publicity rights; profit participations; collective bargaining agreements and artistic credits; non-copyright protection of ideas; contract formation and duration; ethics and regulation of talent representatives such as agents, lawyers, and managers; and selected copyright and trademark issues. Copyright is not a prerequisite, and this class should not be considered as a replacement for the copyright course. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Entertainment Law.

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers.  Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films.  Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC;  acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases.  Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Negotiating and Drafting Media Industry Transactions.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.  This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Environmental Law (3) Law-7541
This course constitutes an analysis of the ends and means of environmental protection through study of statutes, administrative regulations and practices, and judicial decisions treating the protection of the environment in the United States. Topics may include statutes that regulate pollution emissions (e.g., Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act); procedural requirements (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act, California Environmental Quality Act); administrative law (e.g., standing, standards of judicial review); hazardous and toxic substances and wastes; risk assessment and management; natural resources and wildlife conservation; enforcement and liability; and environmental justice. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law. The grade in this course is based on a paper.  Note: for the course paper to apply towards the Scholarly Writing requirement, students must meet the minimum grade requirement set by the professor.

Estate and Gift Taxation – JD (3) Law-7833
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.  This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials.  Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.Evidence section with Professor Mainero – this section covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects. 

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653, 7654)
Externships offer practical experience working for a judge (7588), district attorney or public defender (7588), government agency, non-profit or select law office (7590), or the in-house legal department of an entertainment company (7653) or corporation (7654).  Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills.  For information on how to obtain an externship and other program rules, read the Externship Handbook, available at Room 350-D, or on the “Externship Program General Information” course page on TWEN (http://lawschool.westlaw.com/manage/homepage.asp?courseid=33468).

Externships can be taken for 3, 4, or 5 units, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” for 10 units.  (Law firm externships can be taken for 1 or 2 units, only).The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 2 weeks before the start of the semester.  Applications are at the back of the Externship Handbook (see above).  If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course and corresponding section within 1 week.

In addition to fieldwork, first-time externs must attend a one-time classroom component (the "Boot Camp") which provides training in specific lawyering skills relevant to their placements.  The Boot Camp is held during the first week of classes, and students may generally choose among several class times.   Externships of at least 3 units  will satisfy either the Lawyering Skills Requirement or the Practical Writing Requirement (please note one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.)

Family Law (2) Law-7542
This course is a study of the extent to which the state may and does regulate family relationships. The instructor may select topics from among the following: informal and nontraditional familial relationships; control of reproduction and current reproductive technology; antenuptial and separation agreements; legitimacy, adoption, and termination of parental rights; divorce, child custody, support, and paternity proceedings; and the role of the lawyer as counselor. 

Family Violence Clinic – Immigration (3) Law-7586
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Immigration students have primary responsibility representing victims of domestic violence, sex crimes, human trafficking and other crimes that affect families.  Students prepare applications for immigration relief adjudicated by US Citizenship and Immigration Services.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, affidavit drafting, brief writing, and related written advocacy skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two for case supervision.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for FVC-Immigration.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Family Violence Clinic - Protection Orders (3) Law-7655
The Family Violence Clinic (“FVC”) is a semester-long graded clinic open to upper-level law students.  Under faculty supervision, FVC-Protection Order students have primary responsibility for representing victims of domestic violence in court on applications for protective orders in Orange County Superior Court, Family Division.  FVC students also advise pro per applicants for restraining orders before they appear in court on their own for domestic violence hearings.  The clinic operates out of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (AFJC), located approximately five miles from the law school at 150 W. Vermont Avenue in Anaheim.  The seminar component of the course takes place weekly at the law school and focuses on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, direct and cross examination, entering exhibits in court, and related trial skills.  In addition to their work on cases and the weekly seminar, students meet weekly with the professor in teams of two or three for case supervision.  FVC-Protection Order students must be enrolled in or have taken Evidence.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Federal Courts/Jurisdiction (3) Law-7543  
This course examines the scope of the federal judicial power and the role of the federal judiciary in our constitutional system. It considers the relationship of the federal courts to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and the relationship of the federal courts to the state courts. As such, class discussion naturally focuses on separation of powers and federalism principles. Topics may include Supreme Court jurisdiction, congressional control of federal court jurisdiction, justiciability, non-Article III courts, state sovereign immunity, federal court abstention, section 1983, federal review of state court decisions, and federal habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I.

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.    

Financial Accounting (3) Law-7855
This course represents an introduction to accounting for students with little background in the field. Initial emphasis is on established accounting principles and the analysis of financial statements. The course’s perspective is that of a business attorney who might use financial statements to advise clients in various legal settings (e.g., the drafting of financial contracts and the valuation of businesses). Applications to securities law are also considered. This course is a requirement for the Business Law Emphasis program, unless a student has already taken accounting. 

Immigration and Refugee Law (2) Law-7552
This course provides an introduction into the examination of US law (constitutional, statutory, and administrative) governing the entry, presence, and expulsion of foreign nationals (aliens).  Topics include: sources of federal immigration power, immigrant and non-immigrant categories, exclusion, admission, deportability, refugees, and unauthorized migrants.

Intellectual Property (3) Law-7555
This course surveys the primary types of intellectual property under federal and state law. It emphasizes trademarks, copyrights, and patents while also addressing unfair competition, rights of publicity, trade secrets, and protection of designs. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Entertainment Law

International Business Litigation (2) Law-7510
This course deals with the litigation process in the United States when the subject of the litigation involves a transnational business transaction. We will examine the following topics: U.S. jurisdiction and other aspects of forum selection and forum non conveniens; service of process of a U.S. lawsuit abroad; international discovery; sovereign immunity; act of state; and enforcement of foreign judgments in American courts. Emphasis will be on acquiring practical skills in both prosecuting and defending international business litigation suits.  This course will satisfy the Practical Writing Requirement.

Law and Practice of the Hollywood Guilds (3) Law-7634
This course deals with state and federal law related to the most important unions in the entertainment industry, the so-called “Hollywood Guilds” which include the Writers Guild of America (WGA), the Directors of Guild of America (DGA), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA).  Students will consider a wide variety of legal issues and practices related to managing the creation, production and distribution of intellectual property and the division of the income it generates. The course will also examine collective bargaining agreements of the Hollywood Guilds with regards to the employment of actors/performers and directing teams and screenwriters, as well as the financing of projects and the regulation of agents.

Law, Lawyers, and thLegal System in Film (3) Law-7546
The class focuses on film portrayals of law, lawyers, and the legal system as a means of exploring questions of public policy, jurisprudence, professional responsibility, and even personal philosophy and psychology – all through the lens of filmic storytelling and filmmaking technique.  Topics to be discussed include the adversary system, ethical dilemmas, various lawyer-character archetypes, the jury system, the role of judges, the tension between popular notions of justice and certain legal regimes, and the strengths and limits of the legal system as a means of resolving disputes and providing remedies.  This course will satisfy the Scholarly Writing Requirement.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504
This course will focus on the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery.  The course will also focus on the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems.  Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year students and is by application only.  Applications must be submitted to the Director of Bar Services, Professor Mario Mainero, at mmainero@chapman.edu by June 11, 2012.  Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Legal Analysis Workshop (AND Selected Topics in American Law) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.  However, first priority for enrollment in these courses will be given to those students who are required to take them. 

Legal Drafting (2) Law-7573
This course develops the student’s legal writing skills in a variety of areas not covered in a traditional first year legal research and writing course. The student learns to draft wills, contracts, pleadings, discovery plans, discovery, closing arguments to a jury, legislation, client letters, demand letters, settlement proposals, tactical memoranda, and more.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement. 

Legal Writing Skills (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.  Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters.  Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation.  In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study.  Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class.  Priority is given to students who are required to take this course. 

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic is designed to enable students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent and regular practice with actual parties under the supervision of experienced mediators.  While working in the Mediation Clinic students have an opportunity to work with real litigants who have filed small claims, civil harassment and limited civil cases.  

The types of conflicts addressed include, but are not limited to: Neighbor/Neighbor, Landlord/Tenant, Consumer/Merchant, Business/Business, Organizational, Family/Domestic, Personal Injury and Workplace.  The students also interact with practicing attorneys, judges and other court officers.  The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning.  Students will be graded on full participation in the mediation clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance, class participation and willingness to mediate. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Negotiating & Drafting Media Industry Transactions (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors.  The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined.  Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Lawyering Skills Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time.  This course may be applied toward the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations.  Discussion of negotiations theory, strategy, communications skills, and ethical issues.  Students negotiate several different types of situations, both transactional and in anticipation of litigation.  Students research the problems to be negotiated, and prepare various written products, which may include drafting a contract, evaluations of each negotiation, and/or  a final analytical paper discussing some aspect of the negotiations process.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (MPRE)
This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct (from which most states adopt their own rules) and study ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings.  Topics include judicial ethics, litigation ethics, pro bono obligations, the attorney-client privilege, conflicts of interests, solicitation of clients and lawyer advertising. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Psychology of Conflict Resolution (3) Law-7333
Lawyers and their clients often get caught up with negative emotions, such as anger and fear, that undermine their ability to engage in effective problem-solving. This course offers a powerful framework to help students develop an understanding of the emotional and psychological dynamics of conflict and to learn inter-personal skills that will help them work through conflict constructively.  There are both intra-personal and inter-personal components to the course.  This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of their own emotions, judgments and biases, and of how their unconscious “default” communication styles create and exacerbate conflict.  The course also offers prescriptive strategies for working through emotionally charged situations with others. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with course techniques through in-class and out-of-class exercises. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, students must be open and willing to examine their own behavior and motivations and to experiment with new ways of communicating with others. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Real Estate and Land Use Practice Skills (3) Law-7651
This course is designed to provide students with practical skills needed to represent clients in a variety of core real estate and land use matters. In particular, students will learn how to negotiate and draft term sheets, memoranda of understanding, purchase and sale agreements, leases, easements, municipal ordinances, covenants, conditions, and restrictions and a variety of other transactional documentation. Classes will take the form of workshops where students will negotiate against each other and students will be provided with real world materials to analyze, interpret, and revise. Grading through an in-class final project which will involve an in-class negotiation and revision of a transactional document.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Real Estate Tax Planning JD (2) Law-7884
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Property I, & Property II.  Taxation of Business Organization is recommended.

Real Estate Transactions (3) Law-7870
A study of various aspects of real estate transactions and financing. Topics may include contracts of sale, brokerage, buyer-seller rights and obligations, title insurance, development, commercial leasing, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, foreclosure, receivership, priorities, subordination, suretyship, securitization, tax considerations, and strategies of negotiation and drafting. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies.  Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law.  This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time.  Note: any student entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law (AND Legal Analysis Workshop) in order to graduate. Because of the helpful and important nature of these courses, all students in the bottom 50% are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.  Enrollment is limited to third and fourth year law students.

Spontaneous Order and the Law (3) Law-7831
This course shows how experimental economics can be used to understand how spontaneous, self-generating orders emerge (out of apparent chaos) in law and economics.  This course uses a combination of hands-on learning in laboratory experiments and Socratic roundtable discussions of readings. In addition to current research in experimental economics, the readings range from works by Yale law professor Robert Ellickson to the 18th century Scottish enlightenment philosophers Adam Smith, David Hume, and their modern intellectual heir F.A. Hayek. Students who take this course will learn how experimental economics can be used to understand how exchange systems work and how rules of law emerge to undergird exchange.  For much of the course, our particular focus will be on property.  Our three guiding texts will be Ellickson’s Order without Law, Stephen Buckle's Natural Law and the Theory of Property: Grotius to Hume, Hayek’s Law, Legislation, and Liberty, Volume 1: Rules and Order. By building on this experience students will develop projects to explore different applications to the theory and law of property.

Tax Procedure & Administration – JD (3) Law – 7609
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Tax Procedure and Administration Clinic (1) Law-7612
The clinical component of the Tax Procedure and Administration course allows students to handle actual tax controversy cases for low income taxpayers on a pro bono basis before the IRS and in U.S. Tax Court under special rules of student practice.  Students learn the practical application of tax procedures and handle all aspects of their cases, including trial if necessary.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and concurrent enrollment in Tax Procedure and Administration. This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial.  It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials.  The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination.   Prerequisites: successful completion of Evidence.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.  This course will satisfy the Lawyering Skills requirement.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - Must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course.  Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list. 

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested
This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes.  The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing.  The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy either the Substantial Writing requirement OR the Practical Writing Requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor.

Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) staff members may each receive up to two units of academic credit per semester for a total of eight units; and, 2) editors may each receive up to three units of academic credit per semester of participation in their final year of law school which, together with credits received as a staff member, may not exceed ten units.

Each Staff Editor [2L's] may enroll in Directed Research in the fall for up to three (3) units. Each Staff Editor shall receive one (1) to two (2) units of academic credits in the spring due to participation on Law Review, not to exceed four (4) total units for the academic year.

The Business Development Editor, Production Editor, Submissions Editor [3L's or 4L's], and each third or fourth year Editor who is not on the Executive Board, may receive up to two (2) credits per semester.  Each of the aforementioned, upon application to the EIC, for good cause may petition the Law Reviews Faculty Advisors for one (1) additional credit per semester for a highly exceptional performance.

It is expected that the EIC, Managing Editor, four Senior Articles Editors, two Seniors Notes & Comments Editors, and the Senior Symposium Editor [3L's or 4L's], upon satisfactory performance of their duties, may apply for and receive up to three (3) credits per semester.  Each of the aforementioned, for good cause, may petition the Law Reviews Faculty Advisors for one (1) additional credit per semester for a highly exceptional performance.

Nexus Journal Law-7867
Nexus 
is a peer-edited journal of opinion operated by students.  The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the wide array of individuals and groups affecting American life.  Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows: 1) Staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester; and, 2) Editors may each receive two units of academic credit per semester.  The production of a student note (whether published or not) may satisfy the writing requirement if the note meets the standards set by the faculty advisor.  This course may satisfy either the Substantial Writing requirement OR the Practical Writing Requirement.

Skills Competitions Law-7861

Lawyering skills competitions are an important component of legal education.  Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism.    Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiation, Mediation, Representation in Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional or national level of competition, or three units for Arbitration, Trial, and Appellate competitions outside the law school.    This course may satisfy the Lawyering Skills Requirement with a two credit minimum.  Only Appellate Moot Court Competitions (or other competitions requiring a substantial written brief) may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.

LL.M. Course Descriptions

Corporate Tax I (3) Law-7613
The basic federal income tax consequences to regular corporations and their shareholders of incorporations, capital contributions, corporate operations, dividend and other distributions, stock dividends, redemptions and liquidations, the accumulated earnings tax, and the personal holding company tax.  S corporation taxation will also be briefly discussed.

Criminal Procedure: Practice and Professionalism (2) Law-8023
This course is designed to give the students the skills and information litigators need to know when they appear in court.  Students will understand how to independently handle misdemeanor filings, pre trial negotiations, motions, felony preliminary hearings and misdemeanor jury trials.  This course is designed to prepare you for your spring semester externship by providing an understanding of criminal terminology, common penal and evidence code sections, and the most common type of jury trials that you will likely handle including domestic violence and driving under the influence.  At the conclusion of the semester, the students will have been exposed to a wide variety of topics that they are likely to encounter in their externship placements.

Divorce Taxation (1) Law-7892
An examination of the tax issues that must be considered in representing a divorcing or divorced client, including alimony and child support rules, pension issues, tax aspects of dealing with residences, business interests and other property, and the innocent spouse provisions, as well as a review of estate planning issues.

Estate and Gift Taxation – LL.M (3) Law-7833 
A comprehensive study of the federal transfer tax system, including the gift tax, the estate tax and the generation-skipping transfer tax, with some attention to planning issues, including the tax treatment of property owned at death and property transferred during life, the marital and charitable contribution deductions and other deductions and credits, as well as an overview of procedural and valuation issues.

Estate Planning High Net Worth Individuals (1) Law-7836 
A discussion of current techniques for reducing the transfer tax burden for estates of high net worth individuals.  Prerequisite: Estate & Gift Taxation.

Income Tax for LL.M Students (3) Law-7618
This course presumes some familiarity with the federal income tax.  The course will focus on (1) the taxation of property transactions and related tax shelter issues, and (2) principles of tax accounting.  Topics covered will include realization and recognition, non recognition transactions such as like-kind exchanges and involuntary conversions, transactions involving debt, depreciation and amortization, capital gains and losses (and related issues such as depreciation recapture), loss limitation rules and the alternative minimum tax, accounting periods, accounting methods, installment sales, time value of money rules (original issue discount and related rules), and the relationship between tax and financial accounting.  This course may not be taken by J.D. students. 

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Preliminary Hearings (2) Law-8022
This course focuses on specialized, advanced topics in advocacy, and specifically on putting on and defending felony preliminary hearings in California. It is open only to students who will be serving as an extern or LLM-trial advocacy lawyer in Spring 2010. Units of study will include the timing of the hearing, the role of the defendant at the hearing, limitations on the right to a public hearing, the holding order, evidentiary rules at the hearing, and superior court review of the magistrate’s decision.

Real Estate Tax Planning (2) Law-7885
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisites: Income Taxation for LL.M. Students; Partnership Tax.

Tax Procedure and Admin – LL.M (3) Law-7619
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties.

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