photo 1- student is pointing to the results on a heart monitor, photo 2-health science students wearing their graduation stoles at awards ceremony, photo 3- two students hold up the arm of a human skeleton model

»Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences or Kinesiology

The Department of Health Sciences and Kinesiology offers two Bachelor’s of Science (B.S.) degrees.  Both degrees/majors are designed to prepare students for graduate work leading to careers in health care fields.  The B.S. in Health Sciences offer a combination of basic science, behavioral science, and health science courses that provide students with a multidisciplinary understanding of health and healthcare in today's society.  The elective choices are “areas of study” that fulfill the requirements for various healthcare professions.  The B.S. in Kinesiology is the study of human motion as it relates to physical activity, health, exercise, and nutrition in relation to disease prevention and athletic performance.  The elective choices offer an interdisciplinary approach that allows students to have focus areas in nutrition and/or exercise physiology.  Both B.S. degrees require core science courses that fulfills the common science prerequisites for admission into medical school and graduate health care professional degree programs.

The faculty are committed to providing personalized instruction combined with theoretical knowledge and hands-on experience.  The rigor of the curriculum helps to make our graduates attractive candidates for advanced degrees and careers in health related professions.  In addition, we have laboratories and offer laboratory experiences for undergraduates that are usually reserved for graduate students.  For example, students learn anatomy in a human cadaver lab and they will learn how to interpret an electrocardiogram in our human performance lab.  Next, students are given opportunities to gain clinical experience in various health care professions where recruiters from various local hospitals are invited to discuss their Clinical Care Extender Program with our students.  Finally, we offer research opportunities in the labs of our faculty for students interested in receiving Department Honors. 

+-Program Advising

Students are assigned two advisors.  One is an academic advisor (Irene Quinlan) who assists students in the registration process as well as guide students to ensure they have met all the General Education requirements.  The other is a faculty advisor (Health Science & Kinesiology faculty member) who will guide students to help ensure they have fulfilled all the Departmental requirements.  In addition, the faculty advisor will provide mentorship pertaining to various health care professions.  Finally, students will have access to a Student Peer Advisor.  This individual can assist students in basic questions pertaining to coursework, student clubs, and tutoring services.

Kinesiology Academic Advisor: Chanda Ishisaka

Health Sciences Academic Advisor: Irene Quinlan

Health Sciences Student Peer Advisor: Hanna James
Office Hours: Tuesday 9 -10 a.m.; Wednesday 10 - noon; Thursday 11:30-12:30 p.m.

Kinesiology Student Peer Advisor: Emily Hamocon
Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Thursdays 2 -4 p.m.

Students interested in medical school should contact their science faculty advisor. Students interested in health care professions other than an allopathic medical school can contact the following individuals listed below:

Dentistry - Dr. Rowland-Goldsmith (
Veterinary - Dr. Dan Wellman (
Pharmacy - Dr. Elaine Schwartz (
Optometry - Dr. Frank Frisch (
Osteopathic Medecine - Dr. Macia Abbott (
PT, OT, PA, and NP - Dr. Ken Sumida (

+-4-Year Plan

Sample 4 year Schedule for Health Science Majors with focus on the Health Science Requirements (no GE courses are included)


Fall Interterm Spring
Bio 204/204L             HSK 101                   Bio 205/205L or Bio 208/208L   
Chem 140/140L Chem 150/150L
Math 110   Math 111   


Fall Interterm Spring
Physics 107/107L                                     Physics 108/108L        
Psy 101  HSK/Bio 210/210L   
Math 203 or Psy 203  Soc 101


Fall Interterm Spring
HSK/Bio 365                                     HSK/Bio 366/366L       
Soc 385  Psy 436 
HSC Elective               HSC Elective


Fall Interterm Spring
HSK 357                                  HSK 492                     
HSC Elective               HSC Elective

The Health Science (HSC) electives are dependent upon the “Area of Study” for a given Health Care Profession (e.g. Physician’s Assistant) and are listed in the catalog.

Sample 4 year Schedule for Kinesiology Majors with focus on the Kinesiology Requirements (no GE courses are included)


Fall Interterm Spring
Bio 204/204L                                         Bio 205/205L or Bio 208/208L   
Chem 140/140L Chem 150/150L
HSK 250  Math 110 


Fall Interterm Spring
Physics 107/107L           HSK 290             Physics 108/108L                    
Math 111 HSK/Bio 366/366L 
HSK/Bio 210/210L  FSN 200


Fall Interterm Spring
HSK/Bio 365                                            HSK/Bio 350/350L                 
Math 203 HSK 301/302


Fall Interterm Spring
Kines Elective                                            HSK 498  
Kines Elective Kines Elective                      
HSK 490

A list of Kinesiology (Kines) electives courses are listed in the catalog.

+-Faculty and Student Research


Joo, W., H. Singh, C.P. Ahles, Y. Lee, W. Colazas, L.C. Lee, R.A. Pierce, A. Prakash, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Training-induced increase in bone mineral density between growing male and female rats.  International Journal of Sports Medicine (Accepted).

Ahles, C.P., H. Singh, W. Joo, Y. Lee, L.C. Lee, W. Colazas, R.A. Pierce, A. Prakash, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  High volumes of resistance exercise are not required for greater bone mineral density during growth.  Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 45(1): 36-42, 2013.

Horani, M., A. Dror, D. Holland, F. Caporaso, K.D. Sumida, and F. Frisch.  Prevalence of vitamin D3 deficiency in Orange County residents.  Journal of Community Health 36(5): 760-764, 2011.

Pierce, R.A., L.C. Lee, C.P. Ahles, S.M. Shdo, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Different training volumes yield equivalent increases in BMD.  International Journal of Sports Medicine 31: 803-809, 2010.

Kayser, B.D.,  J.K. Godfrey, R.M. Cunningham, R.A. Pierce, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Equal BMD after daily or triweekly exercise in growing rats.  International Journal of Sports Medicine 31: 44-50, 2010.

Godfrey, J.K., B.D. Kayser, G.V. Gomez, J. Bennett, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Interrupted resistance training & BMD in growing rats.  International Journal of Sports Medicine 30: 579-584, 2009.

Goettsch, B.M., M.Z. Smith, J.A. O’Brien, G.V. Gomez, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Interrupted vs. uninterrupted training on BMD during growth.   International Journal of Sports Medicine 29: 980-986, 2008.

Smith, M.Z., B.M. Goettsch, R.D. Van Ramshorst, J.A. O’Brien, S.V. Jaque, and K.D. Sumida.  Resistance training & bone mineral density during growth.   International Journal of Sports Medicine 29: 316-321, 2008.

For the above manuscript listings, the names of student authors are underlined.


Student Research Awards:

Woojin Joo (2012), Suzie Shdo (2010), and James Godfrey (2008), under the supervision of Dr. Sumida, were either awarded or among the finalist for the David Bruce Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract sponsored by the American Physiological Society.

Lucy Lee (2010) and Brittany Goettsch (2007), under the supervision of Dr. Sumida, were awarded second place for their presentation of data at the Graduate Women in Science annual meeting.

+-Faculty Publications

Abbott, M.J., T.M. Roth, L. Ho, L. Wang, D. O’Carroll, and R.A. Nissenson.  Adipocyte-specific Over- expression of Adiponectin Produces Local Effects on Bone Formation.  PLoS One, In Press.

Abbott, M.J. and L.P. Turcotte.  AMPKα2 is involved in exercise training-induced adaptations in insulin- stimulated metabolism in skeletal muscle following high fat diet. J Appl Physiol. 2014 117:869-79.

Abbott, M.J., T Tang, M. Ahmadian, A.B. Lopes, Y. Wang, and H.S. Sul. Desnutrin/ATGL activates PPARδ to promote mitochondrial function for insulin secretion in islet β cells.  Cell Metabolism, 18:883-97, 2013.

Wattanachanya, L., W.D. Lu, R.K. Kundu, L. Wang, M.J. Abbott, D. O’Carroll, T. Quertermous, and R.A. Nissenson.  Increased bone mass in mice lacking the adipokine apelin.  Endocrinology, 154:2069- 80, 2013.

Kao, R.S., M.J. Abbott, A. Louie, D. O'Carroll, W.D. Lu, and R.A. Nissenson.  Constitutive protein kinase A activity in osteocytes produces an anabolic effect on bone.  Bone. 55:277-87, 2013.

Turcotte, L.P. and M.J. Abbott.  Contraction-induced signaling: Evidence of convergent cascades in the regulation of muscle fatty acid metabolism. Canadian J Physiol and Pharmacol. 90:1419-1433, 2012.

Abbott, M.J., S. Constantinescu, and L.P. Turcotte. AMPKα2 is an essential signal in the regulation of insulin-stimulated fatty acid uptake in control-fed and high fat-fed mice.  Exper Physiol. 97:603-17, 2012.

Ahmadian, M., M.J. Abbott, T. Tang, C.S.S. Hudak, Y. Kim, M. Bruss, M.K. Hellerstein, H.Y. Lee, V.T. Samuel, G.I. Shulman, Y. Wang, R.E. Duncan, C. Kang, and H.S. Sul.  Desnutrin/ATGL is regulated by AMPK and is required for a brown adipose phenotype.  Cell Metabolism. 13:739-748, 2011.

Abbott, M.J., L.D. Bogachus, and L.P. Turcotte. AMPKα2 deficiency uncovers time-dependency in the regulation of contraction-induced substrate metabolism in mouse muscle. J Appl Physiol. 111:125-134, 2011. 

Abbott, M.J., T Tang, and H.S. Sul. The role of phospholipase A2-derived mediators in obesity.  Drug Discovery Today: Disease Mechanisms. 8(1), 2011.

Kelly, K.R., M.J. Abbott, and L.P. Turcotte.  Short-term AMPK activation enhances insulin-sensitive FA uptake and oxidation in L6 muscle cells.  Experimental Biology and Medicine. 235:514-521, 2010.

Abbott, M.J., AM Edelman, and L.P. Turcotte. CaMKK is an upstream signal for AMPK in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in rat skeletal muscle.  Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol.  297:1724- 1732, 2009.

Kelly, K.R., C.K. Sung, M.J. Abbott, and L.P. Turcotte. PI3K-dependent insulin regulation of LCFA metabolism in L6 muscle cells:  Involvement of aPKC-ζ in LCFA uptake but not oxidation.  Journal of Endocrinology.  198:375-84, 2008.

Lessor, R. 2012. “Self-Help Movement(s).”  The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements. Edited by D. Snow, D. della Porta, B. Klandermans, and D. McAdam. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Snow, D. and R. Lessor. 2012.  “Consciousness, Conscience, and Social Movements.” The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements. Edited by D. Snow, D. della Porta, B. Klandermans, and D. McAdam. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Snow, D. and R. Lessor.  2010. “Frame Hazards in the Health Arena: The Cases of Obesity, Work Related Illnesses, and Human Egg Donation.” In Social Movements and the Transformation of U. S. Health Care, edited by J. Banaszak-Holl, M. Zald, and S. Levitsky. New York: Oxford University Press.

Lessor, R. 2008. “Adjudicating Frame Shifts and Frame Disputes in the New Millennial University: The Role of the Dean,” The American Sociologist, Volume 39, Numbers 2-3, Pp. 114-129.

Sternlicht, E., F. Frisch, and K.D. Sumida.  Zumba® fitness workouts: are they an appropriate alternative to running or cycling?  Sport Sciences for Health 9(3): 155-159, 2013.

Caporaso, F., F. Frisch, and K.D. Sumida.  Compromised bone health in non-obese, older women with low caloric intake.  Journal of Community Health 36(4): 559-564, 2011.

Rugg, S. and E. Sternlicht. The effect of graduated compression tights, compared to running shorts, on counter movement jump performance before and after submaximal running. J. Strength Cond. Res. 27(4): 1067-1073, 2013.

Sternlicht, E., S. Rugg, L. Fujii, K. Tomomitsu, and M. Seki. Electromyographic comparison of a stability ball crunch with a traditional crunch. J. Strength Cond. Res. 21(2): 506-509, 2007.

Sternlicht, E., S. Rugg, M. Bernstein, and S. Armstrong. Electromyographic analysis and comparison of selected abdominal training devices with a traditional crunch. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(1): 157-162, 2005.

Sumida, K.D., J.M. Hill, and A.V. Matveyenko.  Sex differences in hepatic gluconeogenic capacity after chronic alcohol consumption.  Clinical Medicine & Research 5(3): 193-202, 2007.

Sumida, K.D., A.A.. Cogger, and A.V. Matveyenko.  Alcohol-induced suppression of gluconeogenesis is greater in ethanol fed female rat hepatocytes than males.  Alcohol 41(2): 67-75, 2007.

Sumida, K.D., J.H. Urdiales, and C.M. Donovan.  Impact of flow rate on lactate uptake and gluconeogenesis in glucagon-stimulated perfused livers.  American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism 290(1): E185-E191, 2006.

Sumida, K.D., J.H. Urdiales, and C.M. Donovan.  Lactate delivery (not oxygen) limits hepatic gluconeogenesis when blood flow is reduced.  American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism 290(1): E192-E198, 2006.

Sumida, K.D., A.A. Cogger, S.M. Arimoto, and A.V. Matveyenko.  Opposing effects of chronic alcohol consumption on hepatic gluconeogenesis for female versus male rats.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 29(10): 1899-1905, 2005.

Sumida, K.D., S.C. Crandall, P.L. Chadha, and T. Qureshi.  Differential effects of alcohol upon gluconeogenesis from lactate in young and old hepatocytes.  Experimental Gerontology 40(4): 324-329, 2005.

+-Internship Opportunities

Every Spring semester (during a Major’s Meeting), recruiters for the Clinical Care Extender Program from local hospitals and owners from rehabilitation clinics are invited to introduce their program to our majors.  Interested students can sign up to gain clinical experience at these hospitals or clinics.  Clinical experience hours are required for admission into any health care profession.

+-Student Clubs

Tri-Beta (National Science Student Honor Society)
Tri-Beta is a national honors biological society, dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study and extending boundaries of human knowledge through scientific research, particularly for undergraduate students. The Chapman University Chapter of Beta Beta Beta holds bi-weekly meetings that are a time to connect with fellow students following the same pursuits and consist of graduate school preparation, guest speakers, and preparation for our service events.
There are no GPA requirement for becoming an associate member. In order to become a full member of Tri-Beta, a B grade average must be obtained in 3 separate biology courses.

Club Email:
President:  Taylor Tso

Pre-PT/OT Club
The Pre-PT/Pre-OT Club is committed to the advancement of education and research opportunities to students passionate about the fields of physical therapy and/or occupational therapy. We provide opportunities to meet with admission officers from graduate programs and help students secure internships and prepare for interviews. Our goal is to provide students with the resources and educational tools that will lead them toward a successful future.

Danielle Rosson (Occupational Therapy) -
Emmi Schlaefer (Physical Therapy) -

Pre-Dental Society
Chapman's Pre-Dental Society aims to provide students with resources to help them pursue a career in dentistry. By providing information via guest speakers and current students, we aim to give insight into the field of dentistry and share valuable knowledge so that students will be intelligent, informed, and prepared for dental school.

Allie Kawata –
Tran Le –

Pre-PA Club

The Pre-Physician Assistant Club aims to provide students with opportunities and resources to enhance their medical experience and enthusiasm for the physician assistant profession. The club provides educational tools, clinical experience, and guidance for pre-physician assistant students towards a successful medical education. The club brings admission officers from nearby PA schools and physician assistants to campus, as well as provide opportunities for clinical experience in the surrounding community. Through our meetings we foster a community of dedicated Chapman students and future physician assistants.

Club Email:
President:  Maddie Jahn –

American Medical Student Association (AMSA)

The American Medical Student Association Pre-Medical Chapter of Chapman University (AMSA) is committed to providing the educational tools and resources needed for pre-medical and pre-health students to successfully navigate the path towards the next phase of their medical education. Through research, health seminars, community service, clinical experience, and physician interaction we aim to nurture a community of students dedicated to a life-long interest and career in the field of medicine.

President:  Annie Fleming –

Global Medical Brigades

Global Medical Brigades spends the school year fundraising and collecting medical supplies to prepare to brigade in a foreign country. This year the brigade will be traveling to Nicaragua. The brigade allows students to set up a clinic in an impoverished area of the country and provide much needed medical care to those who wouldn't normally get that care.

Club Email:
President:  John Bouz –

Kinesiology Club

The Kinesiology Club aims to provide resources and information about kinesiology and create a community of students who are interested in the field of kinesiology. The organization welcomes students of all majors to explore the career paths associated with kinesiology, promotes physical activity within the club on campus, and provides opportunities to students to help them prepare for futures in the healthcare field.

President: Jamie Mosley -

+-Alumni Spotlight

marissa delos
Marissa Delos Reyes
PT (Chapman University)

elena granadino
Elena Granadino
Nursing (Duke University)

Justin LaLonde
Justin LaLonde
PT (Samuel Merritt University)

Emily McCoy
Emily McCoy
PA (Marshall B. Ketchum University)
Quinton Wong
Quinton Wong
Podiatry (Western University College of Podiatric Medicine)
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Need Program Advising?

Please contact the department chair, Dr. Ken Sumida via email.

Pre-Health Advising

Our Pre-Health Advising Program sets students up for success as they prepare for medical school and related professional health fields.