» Dr. Quaylan Allen
Assistant Professor

Attallah College of Educational Studies
Dr. Quaylan Allen
Office Location:
Becket Building 212
Email:
Education
California State University, Sacramento, Bachelor of Science
Arizona State University, Master of Education
Arizona State University, Ph.D.
Biography

Dr. Quaylan Allen joined the Attallah College of Educational Studies at Chapman University in 2012 and teaches in the Integrated Educational Studies Program. A 2010 graduate from the Mary Lou Fulton College of Education at Arizona State University, Dr. Allen received his doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies with an emphasis on Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education. His research addresses educational equity by critically examining the implications of social and educational policy and practice on culturally diverse populations. In particular, his research centers on three interrelated areas. The first focuses on the educational outcomes and social mobility of Black males navigating through the P-20 educational pipeline. The second focuses on the construction and performances of diverse Black masculinities and sexualities within school contexts. The third focuses on the development and use of participant visual methodologies with youth populations. Dr. Allen’s most recent project is a longitudinal qualitative visual study examining the educational trajectories and social mobility of cisgender and gender non-conforming heterosexual and queer Black males. In particular, the project identifies contributing factors to Black male school success by examining the qualitative and visual narratives of Black men. The project also qualitatively and visually documents the range of masculinities Black men express within secondary and post-secondary educational contexts that contribute to their school achievement. He currently sits on the editorial board of Urban Education.

K-12 and Higher Education Experience

Dr. Allen has worked in a variety of educational settings including non-profit organizations, universities and K-12 schools. Dr. Allen worked as a coordinator of community education programs for a non-profit organization partnering with Olympic athletes to deliver health and fitness initiative programs in elementary schools. He also served as program director for a National Science Foundation funded technology program for girls of color, where he conducted professional development training for high school teachers on how to engage teenage girls in social justice research using digital technologies (i.e. digital media, computer programming, etc.). Additionally, Dr. Allen has worked in higher education as a program coordinator for residential life living learning communities and first-generation scholarship programs. He has also assisted with high school-to-college programs for Black male high school students and their families, providing academic tutoring, college readiness skills, and mentoring. Finally, Dr. Allen has experience in both neighborhood and charter high schools as an instructor teaching academic development and college readiness to underrepresented students, and as an education researcher examining the impact of school policies and practices on Black male educational outcomes.

Scholarly Research Interests:

Sociology of Education
Race, Class, Gender Equity in Education
Black Male Schooling and Achievement
Black Middle-Class Social Mobility
Visual Methodologies

Peer Reviewed Articles:

Allen, Q. (in press-2016). “They write me off and don’t give me a chance to learn anything”: The positioning, discipline, and resistance of Black male high school students. Anthropology & Education Quarterly

Allen, Q. (2016). Tell your own story”: Manhood, masculinity and racial socialization among Black fathers and their sons. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 39, 1831-1848

Allen, Q. (2015). Race, culture and agency: Examining the ideologies and practices of U.S. teachers of Black male students. Teaching and Teacher Education, 47, 71-81

Allen, Q. (2015). “I’m trying to get my A”: Black male achievers talk about race, school and achievement. The Urban Review, 47(1), 209-231

Allen, Q., White-Smith, K. (2014). “Just as bad as prisons”: The challenge of dismantling the school-to-prison pipeline through teacher and community education. Equity and Excellence in Education, 47(4), 445-460

Hass, M., Allen, Q., & Amoah, M. (2014). Turning points and resilience of academically successful foster youth. Children and Youth Services Review, 44, 387-392.

Allen, Q. & Boyce, T. (2013). Like father, like son?: Reflections on Black cultural capital and generational conceptions of work. Journal of African American Males in Education.

Allen, Q. (2013). "They think minority means lesser than": Black middle-class sons and fathers resisting microaggressions in the school. Urban Education, 48(2), 171-197.

Allen, Q. (2013). Balancing school and cool: Tactics of resistance and accommodation among black middle-class males. Race Ethnicity and Education, 16(2), 203-224.

Allen, Q. (2012). Photographs and stories: Ethics, benefits and dilemmas of using participant photography with black middle-class male youth. Qualitative Research, 12(4), 443-458.

Allen, Q. (2010). Racial microaggressions: The schooling experiences of Black middle-class males in Arizona’s secondary schools. Journal of African American Males in Education, 1(2), 125-143.

Book Chapters

Allen, Q., Santos, H. (in press). “Up To No Good”: The Intersection of Race, Gender and Fear of Black Men in American Society. In T. Boyce (Ed.), Historicizing Fear. University Press of Colorado.

Milner, H.R., Allen, Q., & McGee, E.O. (2014). A framework for thinking and talking about race with teachers. In F.A. Bonner (Ed.), Frameworks and models of Black male success: A guide for p-12 and postsecondary educators. Stylus Publishing.

Harrison, C.K., Allen, Q. (2006). Education, sport and hip-hop through the “mic” of Stuart Scott. In P.S. Spickard (Ed.), Learning culture through sports: Exploring the role of sports in society. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Education.

Conference Presentations:

Allen, Q. (2017). Seeing is Believing: Benefits and Dilemmas of Participatory Visual Methodologies with Black Male Students. American Educational Research Association, San Antonio, TX

Golden, N., Allen, Q. (2017). Black Male Youth and Educational Opportunity: Positioning Theory as a Framework for Responsive Teacher Education. American Educational Research Association, San Antonio, TX

Allen, Q. (2017). (In)Visible men on campus: Black Masculinities, Surveillance and Racial Microaggressions at a Predominantly White Private Liberal Arts University. Pacific Sociological Association, Portland, OR

Allen, Q. (2016). “Because they are Black they get treated differently”: Cultural capital, resistance, and school involvement practices of Black mothers of Black boys. Pacific Sociological Association, Oakland, CA

Allen, Q. (2015). (In)Visible Men on Campus: Black American Middle-Class Masculinities, Social Mobility and Presentation of Self. International Visual Sociological Association, Tinos Island, Greece

Allen, Q. (2015). Contesting at the margins: The exclusion, resistance and accommodation of working-class Black male high school students. Pacific Sociological Association, Long Beach, California

Allen, Q. (2014). “I don’t even like school”: Race, class and gender in Black male schooling, marginalization and resistance. California Sociological Association, Riverside, California

Allen, Q. (2014). “I’m trying to get my A”: Black Male Achievers Talk about Race, School and Achievement. American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Allen, Q. (2014). Teacher Ideology, Agency, and the Social Reproduction of Black Males. American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Allen, Q. (2012). Moments of inclusion: Contesting racial microaggressions in Black middle-class male schooling. American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Allen, Q. (2011). Doing just enough: Black middle-class male resistance and accommodation to school. American Educational Research Association. New Orleans, Louisiana.

Allen, Q. (2010). Voices through images: Participant photography with Black middle-class males. International Visual Sociology Association. Bologna, Italy.

Allen, Q. (2009). Racial microaggressions: The schooling experiences of Black middle-class boys in Arizona’s secondary schools. American Educational Research Association. San Diego, California.

Allen, Q. (2009). Raced, gendered and middle-classed: The educational experiences of American Black middle-class boys in secondary education. Gender and Education Association. London, United Kingdom.

Allen, Q. (2007). The writings on the bathroom wall: Latrinalia on the university campus. International Visual Sociology Association. New York, New York.

Allen, Q. (2007). Latrinalia as resistance: Bathroom graffiti study at Arizona State University. American Educational Research Association. Chicago, Illinois

Allen, Q., Yee, S. (2006). Left behind: Hurricane Katrina and discourse on New Orleans education reform. Society for the Study of Social Problems. Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Yee, S., Allen, Q. (2006). Hiring practices of division 1A and 1AA head football coaches in American higher education. Association of Black Sociologist. Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Allen, Q. (2006). Conversations on a porcelain god: Content discourse analysis on latrinalia graffiti. International Visual Sociology Association. Urbino, Italy.

Appleton, N., Allen, Q., Osanloo, A., Paxton, K., You, B. (2006). In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Holocaust Conference, Scottsdale, Arizona

 

Recent Creative, Scholarly Work and Publications
Allen, Q. (2017). “That’s why I say stay in school”: Black Mothers’ Parental Involvement, Cultural Wealth and Exclusion in their Son’s Schooling. Urban Education
Allen, Q. (2017). “They write me off and don’t give me a chance to learn anything”: Positioning, discipline and black masculinities in school. Anthroplogy and Education Quarterly, 48(3).
Allen, Q. (2016). "Tell your own story”: Manhood, masculinity and racial socialization among Black fathers and their sons. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 39, 1831-1848
Allen, Q. (2016). #Blackmalesmatter: Contributing factors to disproportionality in Black male student discipline (Policy Brief). Center for Urban Education, University of Pittsburgh
Allen, Q. (2015). “I’m trying to get my A”: Black male achievers talk about race, school and achievement. The Urban Review, 47(1), 209-231
Allen, Q. (2015). Race, culture and agency: Examining the ideologies and practices of U.S. teachers of Black male students. Teaching and Teacher Education, 47, 71-81
Milner, H.R., Allen, Q., & McGee, E.O. (2014). A framework for thinking and talking about race with teachers. In F.A. Bonner (Ed.), Frameworks and models of Black male success: A guide for p-12 and postsecondary educators. Stylus Publishing.
Hass, M., Allen, Q., & Amoah, M. (2014). Turning points and resilience of academically successful foster youth. Children and Youth Services Review, 44, 387-392. doi: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2014.07.008
Allen, Q., White-Smith, K. (2014). “Just as bad as prisons”: The challenge of dismantling the school-to-prison pipeline through teacher and community education. Equity and Excellence in Education, 47(4), 445-460
Allen, Q. (2013). “They think minority means lesser than”: Black middle-class sons and fathers resisting microaggressions in the school. Urban Education.
Allen, Q. (2013). Balancing school and cool: Tactics of resistance and accommodation among black middle-class males. Race Ethnicity and Education, 16(2), 203-224.
Allen, Q. & Boyce, T. (2013). Like father, like son?: Reflections on Black cultural capital and generational conceptions of work. Special Edition. Journal of African American Males in Education.
Allen, Q. (2012). Photographs and stories: Ethics, benefits and dilemmas of using participant photography with black middle-class male youth. Qualitative Research, 12(4), 443-458.
Allen, Q. (2010). Racial microaggressions: The schooling experiences of Black middle-class males in Arizona’s secondary schools. Journal of African American Males in Education, 1(2), 125-143.