Dr. Gregory Waymire

Dr. Gregory Waymire

Provost Fellow
Education:
Indiana University Bloomington, Bachelor of Science
University of Chicago, Master of Business Admin.
University of Chicago, Ph.D.

Biography

Gregory Waymire received a bachelor’s degree with honors from Indiana University (1978) and an MBA (1980) and PhD (1984) from the University of Chicago. He is currently the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Accounting at Emory University. He has served previously on the faculties of Chapman University, Washington University (St. Louis), Purdue University, and the University of Iowa, and has taught doctoral courses at Carnegie-Mellon University, University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, and University of Kentucky. He has served as President of the Financial Reporting Section of the American Accounting Association (1998-99) as well as Vice-President of Research (2008-10) and President (2011-12) of the American Accounting Association. His service at Emory has included two stints as a Senior Associate Dean at Emory’s Goizueta Business School (1993-96 and 2003-04) and Emory University’s President’s Advisory Council on Promotion and Tenure (2000-03). He was co-chair of the faculty committee that designed Goizueta’s PhD program (1999-2001) and he chaired the committee that revamped the school’s promotion and tenure policies (2006).

His early research examined the capital market consequences of voluntary disclosures, development of accounting standards, insider trading, and information collection by industry trade associations. This work was published in the Journal of Accounting Research, The Accounting Review, Contemporary Accounting Research, the Journal of Accounting Auditing and Finance, Financial Management, and the Journal of Accounting Literature. His later work has focused on the history of accounting and appeared in the Journal of Accounting Research, Contemporary Accounting Research, Journal of Accounting and Economics, The Accounting Review, Accounting, Organizations & Society, Accounting Horizons, and PNAS. This research has examined topics that include corporate reporting before formation of the SEC, and the emergence of basic accounting institutions dating back to the recordkeeping practices in early human settlements in ancient Mesopotamia. His current research explores the foundations of accounting as reflected in double-entry bookkeeping.