LGBTQ flags

Undergraduate Admission

» LGBTQ Students

Chapman University celebrates all aspects of a student’s unique identity, including their sexual orientation and gender identity and expression. The college application process can be a time filled with emotions of excitement, fear, and uncertainty for any student, and we understand these feelings might be heightened for LGBTQIA students. Please refer to the following list for answers to questions or concerns you might have as an LGBTQIA student applying to Chapman.


Frequently Asked Questions:

+ - Should I come out in my application for Chapman University?

  • It is up to you! Only you can decide if you are comfortable sharing your identity and who you are comfortable sharing it with. With that being said, Chapman University’s Code of Ethics includes the ideals of respect for all persons and focuses on celebrating and valuing diversity in all of its forms. Choosing to come out in your application will provide our admission committee with a more authentic understanding of how you might contribute to our campus community and will never have a negative impact on your application to Chapman!

  • Coming out in your Common Application Personal Essay vs. the Chapman University Member Questions: Keep in mind, all schools you apply to through the Common Application will read the same personal essay response. If you would like to share your sexual orientation or gender identity with only Chapman University, you should do so in your response to one of the Chapman member questions rather than through the personal essay.

+ - How can I express my gender identity in my application?

The Common Application has updated its questions to allow applicants to more accurately share their gender identity with the schools to which they are applying. You will be asked to select your “sex assigned at birth” and will provide an optional free-response space to further elaborate on your gender identity and expression in the way you are most comfortable. Keep in mind, your response to this question will be shared with every school you apply to using the Common Application.

+ - How do I share my preferred name with Chapman University?

As a prospective student, when you register for a campus visit, interview, etc. you will have the option to provide your preferred name. You will also have the option to provide your preferred name when you submit your Common Application. Keep in mind that your preferred name will be used on all communication you receive from the Office of Admission, which may include emails, mailed letters, and phone calls/voicemails.

If you did not provide a preferred name as an applicant and would like to have it changed once you are an enrolled student, you may do so by emailing the Office of the Registrar (for changes to class rosters, grade rosters, and your self-service portal) and by emailing Information Systems and Technology (to update your email address and ID card).

+ - Does Chapman University have all-gender restrooms and gender-inclusive housing options?

There are multiple all-gender restrooms in various buildings on Chapman’s campus. They can be located using the interactive campus map by clicking on the “restrooms” section to view “all-gender” labels.

Residence Life and First Year Experience (RLFYE) is committed to providing a safe, comfortable living environment for all students. Regardless of their reason for a request, students interested in on-campus gender-inclusive housing may contact Sherri Akau, the Associate Director of RLFYE, at maeda@chapman.edu or (714) 516-6138 to discuss the most appropriate accommodations. RLFYE is also in the process of better articulating their gender-inclusive housing policies to make the process easier for all students to participate without any extra effort on their part.

+ - Are there scholarships specifically available for LGBTQIA students?

In addition to merit-based scholarships and federal and state aid, there are a number of organizations that provide scholarships specifically for LGBTQIA identifying students. Some sources for these scholarships include: FinAid.Org, Human Rights Campaign, PFLAG, Point Foundation, and Safe Schools Coalition. Many scholarship you might receive from an outside organization may be “stacked” with your merit scholarship and need-based aid to create your greatest total aid package. Remember to never pay for a scholarship search or application, as these sources are usually scams.

+ - How might my gender identity affect my Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?

  • Selective Service Registration: To be eligible to receive federal student aid, any student who was assigned “male” at birth must register for the Selective Service between ages 18 and 25, regardless of their gender identity or if they have undergone gender confirmation surgery. o If you are unsure of your registration requirements when answering Question 21 or Question 22 on the FAFSA or need a status information letter from Selective Service that clarifies whether or not you are exempt from the registration requirement, you can call the Selective Service System’s Registration Information Office at (888) 655-1825.

  • Name Mismatches: In order for your FAFSA to be accepted for review, your name on the application must match the name associated with your Social Security number. Be sure to only use your current full legal name when completing the FAFSA to ensure that it is processed in a timely manner.

+ - How will I be supported and encouraged academically as an LGBTQIA identifying student at Chapman University?

  • All students have the opportunity to supplement their declared major with a minor (or minors!) while they are studying at Chapman University. The Women’s Studies Minor and LGBTQ Studies Minor offer students the opportunity explore issues surrounding these disciplines in their cultural, political, and artistic contexts in an academic setting.

  • While all Chapman faculty and staff are advocates for students, some are particularly committed to being a resource and advocate for students of specific underrepresented communities. View a list of self-identified advocates for the LGBTQIA student community and other communities.

  • Chapman University offers a program called Breaking Ground established to provide a resource for diversity and equity training on campus. One of the trainings is called Safe Space that is designed to support all members of the LGBTQIA campus community. All Resident Advisors in the residence halls are mandated to be Safe Space trained and many other staff, faculty, and students are trained as well.

  • The Next Step Social Justice Retreat is an annual event that lasts one weekend in February. The goal of the retreat is to give students a forum in which to further develop knowledge, skills, and motivations for becoming better change agents in their communities around social justice issues.

+ - Does Chapman have student organizations for LGBTQIA students?

Students at Chapman are encouraged to celebrate their diversity and interests through involvement with student organizations and co-curricular programs. Breaking Ground, Queer-Straight Alliance, and Queer and Trans People of Color Collective are a few of the student organizations at Chapman focused on LGBTQIA communities. To view a full list of student organizations at Chapman, visit OrgSync!

+ - Does Chapman have a policy in place to protect students from discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity? Is there a procedure for reporting violations?

Chapman University’s Non-discrimination Policy (found in the current course catalog) explicitly “prohibits unlawful harassment and discrimination on the basis of any race, color, religion, sex, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy, national origin, ancestry, citizenship status, age, marital status, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, sexual orientation, military or veteran status, genetic information or any other characteristic protected by applicable state or federal law.”

If a violation occurs, students have multiple resources for reporting incidents on campus, including Public Safety, the Dean of Students, Housing and Residence Life.