» Dr. Laura M. Glynn
Professor, Chair, Department of Psychology

Department of Psychology
Dr. Laura M. Glynn
Office Location:
Crean Hall 101 ( 501 W. Palm Ave )
Phone:
(714) 289-2075
Email:
Education
University of California, Davis, Bachelor of Arts
University of California, San Diego, Master of Arts
University of California, San Diego, Ph.D.
Biography

Dr. Glynn research consists of interdisciplinary program examining the interplay between biological, psychosocial and behavioral processes in human pregnancy and the influences of these processes on fetal/child development. Her research in the realm of maternal-child health covers three main areas:  1. Understanding the underlying causes of premature birth, the most serious problem in maternal-child health and the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States. 2. Elucidating how pre- and postnatal hormone exposures influence the female brain and behavior, and also more specifically the quality of maternal behavior and postpartum depression.  3.  Determining the role of very early life influences in fetal, infant and child development.

Recent Creative, Scholarly Work and Publications
Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2012). Sex moderates associations between prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and human fetal neurological development. Developmental Science, 15, 601-610.
Stapleton LR, Schetter CD, Westling E, Rini C, Glynn LM, Hobel CJ & Sandman CA (2012). Perceived partner support in pregnancy predicts lower maternal and infant distress. Journal of Family Psychology, 26, 453-463.
Sandman CA, Davis EP & Glynn LM (2012). Prescient human fetuses thrive. Psychological Science, 23, 93-100.
Glynn LM (in press) Increasing parity is associated with impaired memory in human mothers. Journal of Women’s Health.
Dunkel Schetter C & Glynn LM (2011). Stress in pregnancy: empirical evidence and theoretical issues to guide interdisciplinary research. In R. Contrada & A. Baum, Eds., Handbook of Stress Science: Biology, Psychology and Health.
Davis EP, Glynn LM, Waffarn F & Sandman CA (2011). Prenatal maternal stress programs infant stress regulation. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 52, 119-129.
Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2011). Prenatal origins of neurological development: A critical period for fetus and mother. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 20,384-389.
Sandman CA, Davis EP, Buss C & Glynn LM (2011). Exposure to prenatal psychobiological stress exerts programming effects on the mother and her fetus. Neuroendocrinology.
Blair MM, Glynn LM, Sandman CA & Davis EP (2011). Prenatal maternal anxiety and early childhood temperament. Stress, 14, 644-651.
Sandman CA, Davis EP, Buss C & Glynn LM (2011). Prenatal programming of human neurological function. International Journal of Peptides, 2011:837596.
Okun ML, Dunkel Schetter C & Glynn LM (2011). Poor sleep quality is associated with preterm birth. Sleep, 34, 1493-1498.
Sandman CA, Davis EP, Buss C & Glynn LM (2011). Prenatal programming of human neurological function. International Journal of Peptides, 2011:837596.
Grant-Beuttler M, Glynn LM, Salisbury AL, Davis EP, Holliday C & Sandman CA (2011). Development of fetal movement between 26 and 36 weeks’ gestation in response to vibroacoustic stimulation. Frontiers in Psychology, 2, 350.
Sandman CA, Cordova CJ, Davis EP, Glynn LM & Buss C (2011). Patterns of fetal heart rate response at ~30 weeks predicts size at birth. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 2, 212-217.
Glynn LM (2010). Giving birth to a new brain: hormone exposures of pregnancy influence human memory. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 35, 1148-1155.
Yim I, Glynn LM, Dunkel Schetter C, Hobel CJ, Chicz-DeMet A & Sandman CA (2010). Prenatal beta-endorphin as an early predictor of postpartum depression symptoms in euthymic women. Journal of Affective Disorders, 125, 395-403.
Abdou CM, Dunkel Schetter C, Campos B, Hilmert CJ, Dominguez TP, Hobel J, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2010). Communalism predicts prenatal affect, stress, and physiology better than ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16, 395-403.
Glynn LM (2010). Implications of maternal programming for fetal neurodevelopment. In A Zimmerman & S Conners, Eds. Maternal Influences on Fetal Neurodevelopment: Clinical and Research Aspects.
Yim I, Glynn LM, Dunkel Schetter C, Hobel CJ, Chicz-DeMet A & Sandman (2009). Elevated corticotrophin-releasing hormone in human pregnancy increases the risk of postpartum depressive symptoms. Archives of General Psychiatry, 66, 162-269.
Sandman CA & Glynn LM (2009). Corticotropin-releasing hormone programs the fetal and maternal brain. Future Neurology, 4, 257-261.
Davis EP, Waffarn F, Uy C, Hobel CJ, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2009). Effect of prenatal glucocorticoid treatment on size at birth among infants born at term gestation. Journal of Perinatology, 29, 731-737.
Buss C, Davis EP, Class QA, Gierczak M, Patillo C, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2009). Maturation of the human fetal startle response: Evidence for sex-specific maturation of the human fetus. Early Human Development, 85, 633-638.
Glynn LM, Dunkel Schetter C, Hobel CJ & Sandman C (2008). Pattern of affect in pregnancy predicts preterm delivery. Health Psychology, 27, 43-51.
Hilmert C, Dunkel Schetter C, Parker Dominguez T, Abdou C, Hobel CJ, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2008). Stress and blood pressure during pregnancy: Racial differences and associations with birth weight. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70, 57-64.
Campos B, Dunkel Schetter C, Abdou C, Hobel CJ, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2008). Familialism, social support, and stress: positive implications for pregnant Latinas. Journal of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 14, 155-162.
Parker Dominguez T, Dunkel Schetter C, Glynn LM, Hobel CJ & Sandman CA (2008). Racial differences in birth outcomes: the role of general, pregnancy, and racism stress. Health Psychology, 27, 194-203.
Ellman LM, Dunkel Schetter C, Hobel CJ, Glynn LM & Sandman CA (2008). Timing of fetal exposure to stress hormones: Effects on newborn physical and neuromuscular maturation. Developmental Psychobiology, 50, 232-241.