Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences

Janeen Hill, Ph.D., Dean

Professors: Frisch, Gabard, Glynn, Griffin, Hill, Kennedy, Lessor, Montgomery, McKenzie, Redding, Schandler, Sumida;

Associate Professors: Bennett, Bisoffi, Brechter, Brodbeck, Brownell, Cipriani, Cleary, Grant–Beuttler, Peterson, Pincus, Shears;

Assistant Professors: Abbott, Boehm, Choi, Dodd, Frederick, Hahn–Holbrook, Hellberg, Nottingham, Smith;

Clinical Associate Professors: Chan, Danyleyko, Tierney, Young;

Clinical Assistant Professors: Brown, Gerke, Gilliland, Jonathan, Marquez, Puri, Tominaga;

Instructional Associate Professor: Mosconi, Sternlicht;

Instructional Assistant Professors: Dana, Rowland–Goldsmith, Walker.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

PreHealth PostBaccalaureate Program

The Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences offers a variety of undergraduate and graduate degree programs to prepare students for graduate school, master's and doctoral level healthcare professional programs and for careers in healthcare and human services settings. The college is committed to helping students develop critical thinking skills, written and verbal communication skills and an evidence–based empirical approach to problem–solving. The faculty are teacher–scholars committed to quality teaching and involving students in the discovery of new knowledge through faculty–student research. All degree programs combine comprehensive didactic education with practical experience to foster the development of interpersonal skills, knowledge and practical expertise.

Undergraduate programs aim to foster an understanding of the biological, psychological and social bases of health and human behavior and require students to engage in individual scholarship or team research that frequently is of an interdisciplinary nature. One distinct goal of the various undergraduate degree programs is to prepare students for graduate study in professional health care programs, medicine and psychology. Students in the school’s graduate programs learn to apply concepts and principles of natural behavioral and social science to be successful in the professional community in a variety of health care and human services settings.

School Honors

Students graduating with a B.S. in Health Sciences or Kinesiology will earn school honors at graduation by meeting the following criteria. Students must have a cumulative GPA of a 3.500 or higher and must have completed independent research. Completion of independent research includes the submission of a scientific manuscript for publication in a peer–reviewed scientific journal or a poster presentation at a regional or national scientific meeting. Student can earn credit for research by enrolling in HESC 491 or KINE 491 under the supervision of a science faculty member. All departmental honor candidates must present their research at the University's Student Research Day. An appropriate assessment score of the research presentation and a vote by the appropriate faculty group will qualify the student for honors.

Students graduating with a B.A. in Psychology will earn honors at graduation by meeting the following criteria: a cumulative GPA of at least 3.500 overall and in major; a grade of "A" in six credits of individual research (PSY 491 or 499) or in at least three credits of individual research (PSY 491 or 499) and at least three credits of fieldwork in psychology (PSY 492) and formal election by the psychology faculty.

PreFood Science, PreHealth Communication, PreMedicine, PreNursing, PreOccupational Therapy, PrePhysical Therapy, PrePhysician Assistant, PreDoctor of Podiatric Medicine

Degrees of study recommended for pre–food science, pre–health communication, pre–medicine, pre–nursing, pre–occupational therapy, pre–physical therapy, pre–physician assistant and pre–doctor of podiatric medicine students are B.S. in Health Sciences. Students are encouraged to meet with the appropriate advisors frequently throughout their undergraduate careers at Chapman.

Students using Advanced Placement (AP) credits to satisfy Chapman University admission requirements please note, not all medical schools and graduate health care programs accept AP credits to satisfy prerequisite requirements. All pre–medicine students should work closely with the pre–medicine advisor to select appropriate coursework.

Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences Undergraduate to Graduate Degree Programs

Accelerated and Bridge Programs

Bridge Program B.S. in Health Sciences to Doctor of Physical Therapy

Health science students are guaranteed early admission into Chapman University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program if they meet the early admission criteria and submit qualifying GRE scores to Chapman’s DPT program before the beginning of the senior year. Start of the DPT program is contingent upon the completion and documentation of required observation hours, the bestowal of the B.S. in Health Sciences degree by the University and a cumulative GPA at graduation of at least a 3.400 and at least a GPA of 3.600 in health science core courses. For specific criteria and deadlines, go to the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences website.

Bridge Program B.S. in Health Sciences to Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Studies (pending PA accreditation anticipated in 2017)

Health science students are guaranteed early admission into Chapman University’s M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies program if they meet the admission criteria. Admission into the M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies is contingent upon the completion of the B.S. in Health Sciences degree, a cumulative GPA at graduation of at least a 3.400 and at least a GPA of 3.600 in health science core courses. For specific criteria and deadlines, go to the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences website.

Bridge Program B.S. in Health Sciences to Master of Science in Food Science*

Health science students are guaranteed early admission into Chapman University’s Master of Science in Food Science program if they meet the early admission criteria. GRE must be taken before the beginning of senior year. For specific eligibility criteria for this program, refer to the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences website.

Bridge Program B.S. in Health Sciences to Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication*

Students interested in obtaining in–depth knowledge of health and risk communication theory, research and applications may pursue a Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication. This 30–credit program is available to students upon completion of the B.S. in Health Science degree. For specific criteria and possible 4 + 1 program option meet with your academic advisor and the program director of the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication.

Accelerated B.S. in Kinesiology to Master of Science in Athletic Training

As a cohort–model program, admission into the Master of Science in Athletic Training is highly competitive and limited. A 3 + 2 accelerated route for admission to the M.S. in Athletic Training allows the undergraduate kinesiology major to apply to the M.S. in Athletic Training in the fall semester of their junior year. If accepted, students would begin the M.S. in Athletic Training program at the conclusion of their junior year. Students accepted into the M.S. in Athletic Training will utilize credits from the graduate program as their area of emphasis and would receive their undergraduate B.S. in Kinesiology degree at the conclusion of their first year of the graduate program. Students interested in this 3 + 2 program are strongly encouraged to meet with an academic advisor as soon as possible in order to meet the admission requirements of the graduate program.

*For this program listed above, graduate courses used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements may also satisfy up to 12 credits of graduate coursework and may be double–counted towards both bachelor's and master's degrees.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences to Doctor of Physical Therapy

This program guarantees excellent health science students a seat in Chapman University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and makes them eligible for scholarship money awarded to outstanding physical therapy students. Early, guaranteed admission is a three–step process.

Step one: academic performance

Step two: early admission declaration and plan

By October 1 of the junior year, the student seeking guaranteed early admission must schedule an interview with Serena Healey (healey@chapman.edu) to review requirements and establish a plan to complete successfully the requirements for guaranteed early admission.

Step three: requirements to convert from conditional to a fully admitted student:

  1. Submit an application through the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) in August before the beginning of the senior year.
  2. Complete the GRE before the beginning of the senior year with the following minimum scores: Verbal 152, Quantitative 148, Writing 4.0.
  3. Submit documentation showing completion of 40 hours of physical therapy observation/experience.
  4. Complete B.S. in Health Sciences degree with a cumulative GPA >3.400. The degree may be completed during any term of the senior year and must be verified by the Office of the University Registrar.
  5. Submit a deposit.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences to Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Studies (pending PA accreditation anticipated in 2017)

This program guarantees excellent health science students a seat in Chapman University’s Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant Studies. Early, guaranteed admission is a three–step process.

Step one: academic performance

Step two: early admission declaration and plan

By November 1 of the junior year, the student seeking guaranteed early admission must schedule an interview with Lonnise Magallanez (magallan@chapman.edu) to review requirements and establish a plan to obtain early, guaranteed admission.

Step three: requirements to convert from conditional to a fully admitted student*:

  1. Submit documentation showing completion of 100 hours of shadowing a practicing physician assistant, M.D. and/or D.O. (for instructions refer to the physician assistant website). An additional 1,000 hours of health care related work experience (paid or voluntary) is also required.
  2. Submit three letters of recommendation, one of which from a physician assistant or a medical doctor (M.D. or D.O.) during any term of the senior year (for instructions refer to the physician assistant website).
  3. Complete the GRE before the beginning of the senior year with the following minimum scores; Verbal 150, Quantitative 150, Writing 4.5.
  4. Provide a personal statement (for instructions refer to the physician assistant website).
  5. Interview with physician assistant admission committee during the senior year.
  6. Complete B.S. in Health Sciences degree with a cumulative GPA >3.400. The degree may be completed during any term of the senior year and must be verified by the Office of the University Registrar.

*All admissions are not final until successful completion of a background check.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences to Master of Science in Food Science

This program guarantees excellent Health Science students a seat in Chapman University’s Master of Science in Food Science. Early, guaranteed admission is a three–step process.

Step one: academic performance

Step two: early admission declaration and plan

Before October 1 of the junior year, the student seeking guaranteed early admission must schedule an interview with program director Dr. Anuradha Prakash (prakash@chapman.edu) to review requirements and establish a plan to obtain early, guaranteed admission.

Step three: requirements to convert from conditional to a fully admitted student:

  1. Complete the GRE before the beginning of the senior year with the following minimum scores: Verbal 153, Quantitative 153, Writing 3.5.
  2. Complete B.S. in Health Science degree with a cumulative GPA ≥ 3.000. The degree may be completed during any term of the senior year and must be verified by the Office of the University Registrar.
  3. Submit a deposit.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences to Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication

Students seeking eligibility for the B.S. in Health Sciences to Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication program will pursue the pre–health communication area of study. Students in this area of study must work closely with the health sciences faculty advisor and the program director of health and strategic communication to ensure all eligibility requirements are met.

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology to Master of Science in Athletic Training

The 3 + 2 program is designed for students who want to obtain a master’s degree in athletic training where they start the graduate program in their senior year. The graduate courses taken in their senior year will fulfill the completion of their bachelor’s degree as well as the first year of the graduate program.

Application process and admission requirements

Chapman University’s M.S. in Athletic Training program will be using the Athletic Training Centralized Application System (ATCAS). Applications may be obtained from ATCAS at http://caate.net/apply-now/ and will be available the year prior to the intended matriculation, beginning each year in July. The M.S. in Athletic Training program has two routes for admission, with each route requiring the prospective student to complete the required course prerequisites. For regular admission, please refer to the M.S. in Athletic Training website (http://www.chapman.edu/crean/academic-programs/graduate-programs/ms-athletic-training/index.aspx). For accelerated admission (i.e. 3 + 2), please refer to the criteria below.

3 + 2 accelerated admission

The following criteria are required for 3 + 2 accelerated admission:

  1. Kinesiology undergraduate major at Chapman University.
  2. All general education courses completed prior to matriculation.
  3. All major kinesiology major courses completed with the exception of emphasis area courses (24 credits of the M.S. in Athletic Training program will count towards the undergraduate degree requirements and will be used for the area of emphasis within the kinesiology major).
  4. Minimum of 100 completed undergraduate credits prior to matriculation.
  5. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher.
  6. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.000 scale) with no course grade below a "C".
  7. Complete the GRE, then contact Dr. Jason Bennett at jbennett@chapman.edu to determine if the minimum GRE scores were achieved.

Department of Health Sciences and Kinesiology

Kenneth Sumida, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Frisch, Griffin, Lessor, Sumida;

Associate Professors: Bisoffi;

Assistant Professors: Abbott, Hellberg;

Instructional Associate Professors: Sternlicht;

Instructional Assistant Professors: Rowland–Goldsmith.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

PreHealth Post Baccalaureate Program

The Department of Health Sciences and Kinesiology offers two bachelor of science degrees designed to prepare students for graduate work leading to careers in human performance and health care fields. Both degrees have a core that is composed of science courses that are the common prerequisites for admission into health care graduate programs as well as medical school.

The B.S. in Health Science is a combination of basic science, behavioral science and health science courses help to equip all students with a multidisciplinary understanding of human physiology, various medical professions and patient centered health care in today's society. The 53 credit core is complemented by a 15–16 credit area of study which reflects an area of interest for graduate work in specialized health care professions.

The B.S. in Kinesiology offers courses that focus on the physiological, biomechanical and metabolic consequences of diet and exercise. This major offers a 64 credit core requirement with nine credits of electives.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

The B.S. in Health Sciences is designed to prepare students for graduate work leading to careers in health care fields. The degree's core is composed of science courses that are the common prerequisites for admission into health care graduate programs as well as medical school. A combination of basic science, behavioral science and health science courses help to equip all students with a multidisciplinary understanding of the human body and health care in today's society as well as fulfilling requirements for various health care professions.

major requirements

Students must take the list of required courses identified below. In addition, the student will select a 15–16 credit area of study in order to complete the degree. The areas of study include: pre–physical therapy, pre–occupational therapy, pre–physician assistant and pre–nursing, pre–med, pre–food science, pre–health communications and pre–doctor of podiatric medicine.

All courses must be taken for a grade except for HESC 101 which is P/NP. An overall GPA of 2.000 for all required courses listed below are necessary for graduation. Students who qualify (via GPA) and are attempting to meet the research requirements for school/departmental honors may pursue another option rather than HESC 492. Instead, they can replace this course with HESC 491 (Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity) and they are expected to meet the research requirements indicated above for school honors.

degree core (53 credits)

requirements (50 credits)

HESC 101

Introduction to Health Care Professions

1

PHYS 107/107L

General Physics for the Life Sciences I/Lab–General Physics for the Life Sciences I

4

PHYS 108/108L

General Physics for the Life Sciences II/Lab–General Physics for the Life Sciences II

4

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111/111L

Single Variable Calculus II/Single Variable Calculus II Lab

3

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

BIOL 204/204L

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I)/From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I) Lab

4

HESC 210/210L

Human Anatomy/Human Anatomy Lab

4

HESC 357

Seminar in Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Health Sciences

3

HESC 365

Human Physiology Part A

3

HESC 366/366L

Human Physiology Part B/Human Physiology Part B Lab

4

SOC 385

Medical Sociology (prerequisite SOC 101)

3

PSY 436

Health Psychology

3

HESC 492

Capstone Seminar Internship in Health Sciences

3

one of the following (3 credits)

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

PSY 203

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

3

area of study requirements (15–16 credits)

Select one area of study: pre–physical therapy, pre–occupational therapy, pre–physician assistant and pre–nursing, pre–doctor of podiatric medicine, pre–food science or pre–health communications

15–16

total credits

 

68–69

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Health Sciences.

prephysical therapy area of study (16 credits)

Students interested in pursuing graduate school in physical therapy with a B.S. in Health Sciences are eligible for Chapman's Doctor of Physical Therapy bridge program. Students gain automatic acceptance into Chapman's DPT program, but they must meet specific requirements. Students participating in the bridge program must work closely with a health sciences academic advisor to insure all eligibility requirements are met.

one of the following (4 credits)

BIOL 208/208L

Introduction to Molecular Genetics/Introduction to Molecular Genetics Lab

4

BIOL 417/417L

Microbiology/Microbiology Lab (prerequisite CHEM 230/230L)

4

psychology (6 credits)

two of the following (PSY 101 is the prerequisite for the psychology courses)

PSY 327

Life Span Development (highly recommended)

3

PSY 328

Abnormal Psychology (highly recommended)

3

PSY 341

Cross–Cultural Psychology

3

PSY 344

Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

3

PSY 345

Sports Psychology

3

PSY 355

Diversity in Marital and Family Relationships

3

PSY 428

Introduction to Clinical Psychology

3

PSY 432

Introduction to Psychological Assessment

3

PSY 433

Psychopharmacology

3

PSY 437

Health and Well–Being

3

PSY 446

Children and Trauma

3

PSY 461

Psychology of Music

3

PSY 481

Organizational Psychology

3

PSY 482

Forensic Psychology

3

PSY 495

Topics in Applied Psychology

3

electives (6 credits)

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

3

FSN 339

Lifestyle and Clinical Nutrition

3

HESC 350/350L

Applied Exercise Physiology/Applied Exercise Physiology Lab

4

BIOL 355

Physiology of Drugs

3

BIOL 407

Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3

HCOM 482

Advanced Health Communication

3

HESC 490

Independent Internship

½–3

preoccupational therapy area of study (16 credits)

Students interested in completing the coursework commonly listed as prerequisites for acceptance into a graduate school in occupational therapy will pursue this area of study.

one of the following (4 credits)

BIOL 205/205L

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms

(Gen Bio II)/Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Bio II) Lab

4

BIOL 208/208L

Introduction to Molecular Genetics/Introduction to Molecular Genetics Lab

4

psychology (6 credits)

two of the following (PSY 101 is the prerequisite for the psychology courses)

PSY 327

Life Span Development (highly recommended)

3

PSY 328

Abnormal Psychology (highly recommended)

3

PSY 336

Social Psychology

3

PSY 341

Cross–Cultural Psychology

3

PSY 344

Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

3

PSY 345

Sports Psychology

3

PSY 355

Diversity in Marital and Family Relationships

3

PSY 428

Introduction to Clinical Psychology

3

PSY 432

Introduction to Psychological Assessment

3

PSY 433

Psychopharmacology

3

PSY 437

Health and Well–Being

3

PSY 446

Children and Trauma

3

PSY 461

Psychology of Music

3

PSY 481

Organizational Psychology

3

PSY 482

Forensic Psychology

3

PSY 495

Topics in Applied Psychology

3

electives (6 credits)

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

PHIL 314

Medical Ethics

3

PSY 333

Physiological Psychology

3

FSN 339

Lifestyle and Clinical Nutrition

3

HESC 350/350L

Applied Exercise Physiology/Applied Exercise Physiology Lab

4

HCOM 388

Nonverbal Communication in Health Care Environments

3

BIOL 407

Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3

HESC 490

Independent Internship

½–3

prephysician assistant and prenursing area of study (16 credits)

Students interested in completing the coursework commonly listed as prerequisites for acceptance into the physician assistant master's degree program or the master's degree in nursing will pursue this area of study. Students interested in pursuing a master's degree as a physician's assistant with a B.S. in Health Sciences are eligible for Chapman's bridge program to our graduate program in physician assistant studies (master's degree in medical science). Students are automatically accepted to Chapman's physician assistant studies program, but they must meet specific requirements. Students participating in the bridge program must work closely with a health sciences advisor to insure all eligibility requirements are met.

requirement (4 credits)

BIOL 417/417L

Microbiology/Microbiology Lab (prerequisite CHEM 230/230L)

4

one of the following (4 credits)

BIOL 205/205L

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Bio II)/Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Bio II) Lab

4

BIOL 208/208L

 

Introduction to Molecular Genetics/Introduction to Molecular Genetics Lab

4

electives (8 credits)

HESC 105

Medical Terminology

1

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

4

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

4

PHIL 314

Medical Ethics (recommended for Chapman's PA)

3

BIOL 330/330L

General Genetics/General Genetics Lab

4

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

4

BCHM 350

Medicinal Chemistry

3

HESC 490

Independent Internship

½–3

predoctor of podiatric medicine area of study (16 credits)

Students seeking eligibility for the Schmid College of Science and Technology Health Science and Western University of Health Sciences Doctor of Podiatric Medicine linkage program will pursue this area of study. Students in this area of study must work closely with the health sciences faculty advisor to meet all articulation requirements for this linkage program.

requirements (12 credits)

BIOL 205/205L

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Bio II)/Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Bio II) Lab

4

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

4

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

4

electives (4 credits)

BIOL 337

Immunology

3

BIOL 407

Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3

BIOL 417/417L

Microbiology/Microbiology Lab

4

HESC 490

Independent Internship

½–3

premedicine area of study (16 credits)

Students interested in completing the coursework commonly listed as prerequisites for acceptance into a medical school will pursue this area of study. Note: Students should also take SOC 101 and PSY 101 since this is required for the MCAT.

requirements (16 credits)

BIOL 208/208L

Introduction to Molecular Genetics/Introduction to Molecular Genetics Lab

4

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

4

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

4

BCHM 335/335L

Biochemistry I: BioMolecules/Biochemistry I: BioMolecules Laboratory

4

prefood science area of study (16 credits)

Students seeking eligibility for the B.S. in Health Sciences/M.S. in Food Science bridge program will pursue this area of study. Students in this area of study must work closely with the health sciences faculty advisor to ensure all eligibility requirements are met.

requirements (12 credits)

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

4

BIOL 417/417L

Microbiology/Microbiology Lab

4

HESC 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

one of the following (4 credits)

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory or

4

BCHM 335/335L

Biochemistry I: BioMolecules/Biochemistry I: BioMolecules Laboratory

4

prehealth communication area of study (15 credits)

Students seeking eligibility for the B.S. in Health Sciences/M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication bridge program will pursue this area of study. Students in this area of study must work closely with the health sciences faculty advisor and the program director of health and strategic communication to ensure all eligibility requirements are met.

requirements (6 credits)

COM 110

Interpersonal Communication

3

HCOM 482

Advanced Health Communication

3

electives (9 credits)

Three of the following or with approval and in coordination with the health science faculty advisor and the program director of the health and strategic communication HCOM graduate level courses may be used to satisfy these undergraduate degree requirements and also satisfy up to 12 credits of graduate coursework and may be double–counted towards both bachelor's and master's degrees.

SOC 305

Social Theory

3

FSN 339

Lifestyle and Clinical Nutrition

3

PSY 341

Cross–Cultural Psychology

3

SOC 345

Social Psychology

3

COM 355

Family Communication

3

SOC 382

Women, Health and Healing

3

SOC 404

Global Family Systems

3

PSY 437

Health and Well–Being

3

SOC 480

Topics in the Sociology of Health

3

SOC 481

Holistic Health

3

PSY 482

Forensic Psychology

3

SOC 483

Political Economy of Health and Medicine

3

other elective courses (under "area of study") that can be used to fulfill the B.S. in Health Sciences degree

HESC 105

Medical Terminology

1

KINE 301/302

Applied Biomechanic/ Applied Biomechanics Lab

3,1

HESC 310

International Approaches to Health Science

3

KINE 340

Science of Obesity

3

KINE 345

Diet, Disease, and Exercise

3

HESC 350/350L

Applied Exercise Physiology/Applied Exercise Physiology Lab

4

HESC 370

Health Planning

3

HESC 385

Health and Aging

3

KINE 435

Motor Control and Learning

3

Other basic science and behavioral science courses can be used as elective courses to fulfill the health sciences degree based upon the student’s interest and goals, but must be approved by the department chair of health sciences and kinesiology.

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

Kinesiology is the study of human motion as it relates to physical activity, health, exercise and nutrition in disease prevention and athletic performance, as well as injury prevention and treatment. Students will study the areas of human anatomy, human physiology, nutrition, metabolism, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control and motor development. The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology is designed to provide a solid science foundation, while preparing students for graduate work in health professions or careers in fields related to exercise, sports performance and health promotion. The B.S. in Kinesiology offers courses that focus on the biomechanical and metabolic consequences of exercise. This major offers a 64 credit core requirement with nine credits of electives. This interdisciplinary approach allows students to have focus areas in nutrition and/or exercise physiology. Students are encouraged to minor in disciplines like dance, education (for those students who elect to pursue teaching degrees), physics, biology or biochemistry.

Students interested in the health profession career of athletic training are encouraged to apply to our 3 + 2 accelerated program within the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science in Athletic Training. In this accelerated program, students take a prescribed set of undergraduate courses for three years and then advance for two additional years of graduate work in athletic training. Advising for this accelerated program is critical as students must apply during their junior year. As a cohort-model program, admission into the graduate athletic training program is highly competitive and limited. Successful graduates would obtain both a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and a Master of Science in Athletic Training after five years. Upon successful completion of the graduate program, students are eligible to take the national certification exam offered by the Board of Certification, Inc.

degree core (64 credits)

PHYS 107/107L

General Physics for the Life Sciences I/Lab–General Physics for the Life Sciences I

4

PHYS 108/108L

General Physics for the Life Sciences II/Lab–General Physics for the Life Sciences II

4

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

4

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

4

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

BIOL 204/204L

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I)/From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I) Lab

4

BIOL 205/205L*

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II)/Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II) Lab

4

HESC 210/210L

Human Anatomy/Human Anatomy Lab

4

KINE 250

Fundamentals of Kinesiology

3

KINE 270

Statistics for Allied Health Sciences

3

KINE 301/302

Applied Biomechanics/Applied Biomechanics Lab

3,1

HESC 350/350L

Applied Exercise Physiology/Applied Exercise Physiology Lab

4

HESC 365

Human Physiology Part A

3

HESC 366/366L

Human Physiology Part B/Human Physiology Part B Lab

4

KINE 490

Independent Internship

3

KINE 498

Capstone Seminar in Kinesiology

3

*Students may substitute BIOL 208/208L for BIOL 205/205L

electives (9 credits)

complete at least three additional 300 or 400 level elective courses from the following**

KINE 324

Theory of Coaching

3

KINE 329

Experimental Course (topics can vary)

3

KINE 340

Science of Obesity

3

KINE 345

Diet, Disease and Exercise

3

KINE 386

Leadership in a Team Setting

3

KINE 406

Advanced Performance Training for Athletes

3

KINE 435

Motor Control and Learning

3

KINE 491

Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

3

total credits

 

73

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Kinesiology.

other electives**

KINE 160

Health Education

3

KINE 192

Introduction to Athletic Training and Sports Medicine

3

KINE 290

Independent Internship

3

KINE 291

Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

3

**Other courses may be substituted for one of the elective courses with permission of the department chair of health sciences and kinesiology including: CHEM 230, FSN 338, 443, PSY 326, 328, 345, 436 and other applicable basic or behavioral science courses. The goal is to help the kinesiology major meet the requirements for high quality graduate programs.

Department of Psychology

Laura Glynn, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Glynn, Redding, Schandler;

Associate Professors: Brodbeck, Peterson, Pincus, Shears;

Assistant Professors: Boehm, Frederick, Hahn–Holbrook;

Instructional Assistant Professors: Dana, Walker.

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

The B.A. in Psychology helps students acquire a broad–based knowledge in the field of psychology as an empirical science of human behavior. Overall, the B.A. in Psychology is designed for students who want to prepare for graduate study in psychology or related disciplines for graduate study in fields where knowledge of human behavior would be beneficial or for baccalaureate–level careers in human services or in psychological support settings. The curriculum emphasizes critical thinking, methods of psychological inquiry, psychology processes and an evidence–based approach to the application of psychological principles to diverse areas of human behavior. The core foundation curriculum provides the student with the essentials of psychological science and thought. Culminating with the senior thesis, the core curriculum produces an integration of the student's goals and objectives with psychology's present and future. In addition to the core foundation curriculum, students pursue a curriculum of courses covering key psychological processes and applied areas of the field chosen in consultation with their psychology academic advisor. Students are also encouraged to complete elective courses that provide practical fieldwork experience and independent research projects. All courses in the major must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a "C" or higher. The Chapman University chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honors Society in psychology is advised by psychology faculty and actively supports the development and maintenance of a curriculum high in quality and educational effectiveness.

core foundation in psychological science (19 credits)

PSY 101

Introduction to Psychology (prerequisite to all other courses)

3

PSY 201

Critical Thinking

3

PSY 202

History and Systems of Psychology

3

PSY 203

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

3

PSY 204/204L

Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences/Lab for Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

4

PSY 333

Physiological Psychology

3

psychological processes (15 credits)

one course from each of the following five groups

group one

PSY 310

Psychology of Learning

3

PSY 319

Motivation and Emotion

3

group two

PSY 315

Sensation and Perception

3

PSY 317

Cognitive Psychology

3

group three

PSY 322

Theories of Personality

3

PSY 336

Social Psychology

3

group four

PSY 323

Child Development

3

PSY 327

Life Span Development

3

group five

PSY 328

Abnormal Psychology

3

PSY 330

Child Abnormal Psychology

3

applied psychology (6 credits)

two of the following

PSY 340

Human Sexuality

3

PSY 341

Cross–Cultural Psychology

3

PSY 344

Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

3

PSY 345

Sports Psychology

3

PSY 355

Diversity in Marital and Family Relationships

3

PSY 428

Introduction to Clinical Psychology

3

PSY 432

Introduction to Psychological Assessment

3

PSY 433

Psychopharmacology

3

PSY 436

Health Psychology

3

PSY 437

Health and Well–Being

3

PSY 446

Children and Trauma

3

PSY 461

Psychology of Music

3

PSY 481

Organizational Psychology

3

PSY 482

Forensic Psychology

3

PSY 495

Topics in Applied Psychology

3

senior project (6 credits)

Psychology majors are required to choose and complete one of the following three options as a capstone project during their senior year.

option one: directed independent research project

PSY 496

Senior Project: Individual Research (three credits/semester)

6

A two–semester individual research study designed for psychology majors who possess the academic qualifications and intend to continue their education in an academic graduate program and intend to pursue and complete an independent, innovative investigation in psychological science under faculty supervision.

option two: senior thesis

PSY 497a

Senior Thesis (three credits/fall semester)

3

PSY 497b

Senior Thesis (three credits/spring semester)

3

A two–semester thesis–focused seminar for psychology majors who possess the academic qualifications and intend to continue their education in an academic graduate program. Must be taken in sequence "a" in fall semester then "b" in spring semester.

option three: senior seminar in psychological topics

PSY 498

Senior Seminar in Psychological Topics

3

 

One course in applied psychology

3

For psychology majors who intend to pursue nonacademic employment or practice–oriented post–degree studies and training (e.g., marriage and family therapist, certified chemical dependency counselor, licensed clinical social worker, etc.).

total credits

 

46

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.A. in Psychology.

optional internships and individual study

PSY 291

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

PSY 299

Individual Study

1–3

PSY 304

Advanced Research Design

3

PSY 490

Independent Internship

3

PSY 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

PSY 492

Fieldwork in Psychology

3

PSY 499

Individual Study

1–3

Pre–Health Post–Baccalaureate Program

The post–baccalaureate program at Chapman University is recognized by the Association of American Medical Colleges. It is designed for students who already possess a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field of science, who now desire to change their career path toward a pre–health profession. The program offers the student an opportunity to take various courses required of: medical, dental, veterinary, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant and nurse practitioner schools/programs. The program is not intended for those seeking to improve their GPA by repeating courses. For more information please visit the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences website.

admission requirements

All applicants must have graduated from an accredited institution with a bachelor’s degree and a final GPA of 3.200 or above. Students should be ready to take a calculus based physics course by completing at least one semester of calculus. If not, students will be required to complete a pre–calculus course as well as calculus before taking physics. All admitted students will be required to maintain a 3.200 GPA or higher to continue in the program.

typical curriculum requirements

Typical curriculum requirements (e.g. medical school) assuming no previous science courses:

Note–this list will be slightly different for those who wish to pursue programs such as physician assistant, physical therapy, etc.

Students admitted to the program who have already taken one or more of the courses above will have the option of taking recommended upper division courses identified below, up to a maximum of 55 total credits (including the curriculum requirements):

Minors in Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences

Minor in Human Biology

A Minor in Human Biology is a concerned study of cells and their components at the molecular level. Students learn theoretical information and lab techniques to study cells and their processes. A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

requirements (8 credits)

BIOL 204/204L

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I)/From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I) Lab

4

BIOL 208/208L

Introduction to Molecular Genetics/Introduction to Molecular Genetics Lab

4

electives (10 credits)

select any combination of courses

BIOL 337

Immunology

3

BIOL 365

Human Physiology Part A

3

BIOL 407

Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3

BIOL 410

Developmental Biology

3

BIOL 417/417L

Microbiology/Microbiology Lab

4

total credits

 

18

Minor in Kinesiology

Kinesiology is a common avenue to explore careers in the health, fitness and coaching professions along with being a method for obtaining some prerequisite or recommended courses for graduate programs in the health sciences (e.g. physical therapy). Through the Minor in Kinesiology, a student will obtain a diverse understanding of kinesiology through courses in biology, nutrition, psychology, leadership and athletic training. A student can utilize the optional courses to customize the minor towards their specific interests within the kinesiology areas. The KINE 306 course meets the course requirement of the National Strength and Conditioning Association for eligibility to take the national certification test for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach (CSCS) Credential.

requirements (14 credits)

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

BIOL 210/210L

Human Anatomy/Human Anatomy Lab

4

KINE 250

Fundamentals of Kinesiology

3

KINE 301/302

Applied Biomechanics/Applied Biomechanics Lab

3,1

three of the following (9–10 credits)

KINE 306

Introduction to Performance Training for Athletes

3

LEAD 314

Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others

4

KINE 324

Theory of Coaching

3

FSN 338

Nutrition and Human Performance

3

FSN 339

Lifecycle and Clinical Nutrition

3

PSY 345

Sports Psychology

3

KINE 386

Leadership in a Team Setting

3

KINE 406

Advanced Performance Training for Athletes

3

LEAD 414

Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work

3

FSN 443

Medical Nutrition Therapy

3

total credits

 

23–24

Minor in Psychology

The Minor in Psychology is designed to enhance knowledge of a psychological process and/or area within the discipline. A minimum of 12 credits must be upper–division.

requirements (22 credits)

core foundation courses (10 credits)

PSY 101

Introduction to Psychology

3

PSY 203

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

3

PSY 204/204L

Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences/Lab for Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

4

upperdivision courses (12 credits)

Select four upper division courses from psychological processes or applied psychology

12

total credits

 

22

Course Descriptions – Athletic Training

AT 164 Emergency Management in Athletic Training

This course will provide the professional rescuer with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage a variety of emergency situations. The student will learn the essential skills required to help sustain life and minimize pain and consequences of injury or sudden illness until advanced medical help arrives. The course includes instruction, and potential American Red Cross certification, in Blood Borne Pathogens, First Aid, CPR, Oxygen Administration, Auto injector, Inhaler and Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 193 Introduction to Clinical Skills Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major, or consent of instructor. Introduction to the clinical skills and psychomotor competencies necessary for successful patient-care within athletic training and sports medicine settings. Skills introduced and evaluated include basic taping and protective wrapping for the extremities, lower and upper extremity stretching, therapeutic modality application, and basic injury evaluation. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 204 Foundations of Athletic Training

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, or 210, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 204L. Students develop foundational knowledge of athletic training practice with an emphasis on the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 204L Foundations of Athletic Training Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 204, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for the practical application of basic prevention and treatment skills in sports medicine. Students are taught and evaluated on numerous psychomotor skills including basic assessment and management of acute musculoskeletal injuries and selection and application of protective taping, wrapping, and bracing of orthopedic injuries. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 216 Health Care Administration in Athletic Training

Prerequisites, AT 204, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Students develop health care administration knowledge and competencies integral to the practice of athletic training, including legal and ethical responsibilities, financial management and budgeting, documentation and record keeping, and program planning and evaluation. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

AT 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

AT 296 Clinical Fieldwork I

Prerequisites, athletic training major, consent of instructor. Corequisite, AT 204L. This course is designed for athletic training majors beginning their preparations for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows the beginning athletic training student, under the supervision of a clinical instructor, to develop and practice their clinical skills at Chapman University and affiliated high schools, community colleges, physical therapy clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. Fee: $95. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 297 Clinical Fieldwork II

Prerequisites, AT 296, athletic training major. This course is designed for athletic training majors beginning their preparations for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows the beginning athletic training student, under the supervision of a clinical instructor, to develop and practice their clinical skills at Chapman University and affiliated high schools, community colleges, physical therapy clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 299 Individual Study

May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

AT 308 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis: Lower Extremity

Prerequisites, AT 204, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 308L. This course is designed for athletic training majors and covers functional anatomy, recognition, and clinical diagnosis of athletic and musculoskeletal injuries of the lower extremity. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 308L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis: Lower Extremity Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 308, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for the practical application of orthopedic lower extremity evaluation skills in sports medicine. Students are taught and evaluated on numerous psychomotor skills including evaluation of the foot/ankle, knee, patellofemoral joint, hip/thigh, pelvis, and lumbar spine. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 309 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis: Upper Extremity

Prerequisites, AT 204, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 309L. This course is designed for athletic training majors and covers functional anatomy, recognition, and clinical diagnosis of athletic and musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

AT 309L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis: Upper Extremity Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 309, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for the practical application of orthopedic upper extremity evaluation skills in sports medicine. Students are taught and evaluated on numerous psychomotor skills including evaluation of cervical spine, shoulder & shoulder girdle, elbow, and hand/wrist. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 312 Rehabilitation of Orthopedic Injuries and Conditions

Prerequisites, AT 301, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 312L. This course is designed for the development of an evidence-based comprehensive individualized rehabilitation program. Course topics include the determination of therapeutic goals and objectives, selection of therapeutic exercises, methods of evaluating and recording rehabilitation progress and development of criteria for progression and return to normal function. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

AT 312L Orthopedic Rehabilitation Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 312, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for the practical application of rehabilitation skills in sports medicine. Practical techniques include strategies to increase range-of-motion, strength, proprioception, and the psychological needs of injured patients. Special consideration is given to prescribing individualized rehabilitation programs and application of manual therapy. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 314 Therapeutic Modalities

Prerequisites, AT 192, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Evidence-based approach to therapeutic modalities including tissue healing, cryotherapy, superficial thermotherapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, diathermy and mechanical modalities are studied. Special consideration identifies appropriate modalities for various stages of injury management. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 370 Scholarly Inquiry Seminar I

Prerequisites, AT 270, athletic training major, junior standing. This seminar solidifies the concepts of evidence based-practice and the importance of advancing knowledge in Athletic Training. The student will develop a clinical question to be answered in the Capstone Project, search for evidence, and critically analyze the evidence in a systematic manner. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 375 Scholarly Inquiry Seminar II

Prerequisites, AT 370, athletic training major, junior standing. This seminar for junior athletic training students continues the development of knowledge relating to concepts of evidence based-practice; integrates the appraisal of the evidence with personal clinical expertise; evaluates the outcomes of interventions; and advances the knowledge in the Athletic Training profession. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 396 Clinical Fieldwork III

Prerequisites, AT 297, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 308. This course is designed for athletic training majors continuing their preparations for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows intermediate athletic training students, under supervision of their assigned clinical instructors, to further develop and practice clinical skills at Chapman University and approved high schools, community colleges, physical rehabilitation clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. Fee: $95. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 397 Clinical Fieldwork IV

Prerequisites, AT 396, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 312. This course is designed for Athletic Training majors continuing their preparations for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows the intermediate athletic training student, under the supervision of the Clinical Instructor, to develop and practice their clinical skills at Chapman University and affiliated high schools, community colleges, physical therapy clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 398 Athletic Training Fieldwork-Travel Course: Destination

Prerequisites, AT majors, consent of instructor. This course is designed for athletic training majors who have achieved sophomore status and wish to continue their education in athletic training by studying outside of the United States. This course allows the intermediate athletic training student, under the supervision of the faculty and clinical instructors, to develop and practice their clinical skills within a different culture, experiencing unique sport medicine concepts and sport competition opportunities. This course may be audited. May be repeated for credit if destination is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm or summer.) 3 credits.

AT 410 Pharmacology in Sports Medicine

Prerequisite, CHEM 140, or consent of instructor. Students will study the therapeutic use of drugs in sports medicine including the legal, moral, and ethical implications of drug administration. Pharmacokinetics of prescription, non-prescription, and performance enhancement drugs and ergogenic aids will be discussed. This course is designed to meet the competencies set by the NATA. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

AT 411 Evaluation and Management of General Medical Conditions

Prerequisites, AT 308, 309, or consent of instructor, and athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 411L. Advanced athletic training techniques including medical terminology, clinical examination and diagnosis with an emphasis on injuries to the abdomen, spine, neck and thorax. Additional study will include assessment and treatment of traumatic head injuries. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 411L General Medical Evaluation Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 411, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for the practical application of general medical evaluation skills in sports medicine. Practical techniques include strategies to evaluate and diagnose injuries to the abdomen, spine, neck, face, and thorax. Special emphasis will include evaluation of head trauma in sports. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 470 Scholarly Inquiry Seminar III

Prerequisites, AT 375, athletic training major, senior standing. This seminar for senior athletic training students to apply the concepts of evidence based-practice and integrate the evidence appraisal with evaluation of outcomes in the advancement of knowledge in the Athletic Training profession. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

AT 495 Clinical Fieldwork V

Prerequisites, AT 397, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 411. This course is designed for athletic training majors continuing their preparation for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows the advanced athletic training student, under the supervision of the clinical instructor, to continue to develop and practice their clinical skills at Chapman University and affiliated high schools, community colleges, physical therapy clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. Fee: $95. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 496 Clinical Fieldwork VI

Prerequisites, AT 495, athletic training major, senior standing. This capstone course is designed for Athletic Training majors making their final preparations for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination and allows the advanced athletic training student, under the supervision of the Clinical Instructor, to develop and practice their clinical skills at Chapman University and affiliated high schools, community colleges, physical therapy clinics, and/or other athletic training settings. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 498 Capstone Seminar in Athletic Training

Prerequisite, AT 411, or consent of instructor. Corequisite, AT 498L. This capstone course will review competencies and prepare students for the BOC, Inc. Certification Examination. Advanced topics will be presented including professional development, administrative responsibilities, and advanced evaluation and rehabilitation techniques by various local health-care professionals. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

AT 498L Clinical Skills Capstone Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 498, or consent of instructor. This capstone course will review clinical skills acquired in previous lab courses in preparing students for employment settings in athletic training. Focus will be on mastery of previously learned skills and will assist with the students preparation towards the national BOC certification examination. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 499 Individual Study

May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Health Sciences

HESC 101 Introduction to Health Care Professions

Course examines major health professions including professional training, job responsibilities, future demand, and potential earnings. Students will interact with health care professionals throughout the semester. By the semester’s end, students should be able to identify which health careers better fit their interests and talents. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

HESC 105 Medical Terminology

This course will provide students with an understanding of the numerous words and terms used by health care professionals. P/NP. (Offered interterm.) 1 credit.

HESC 112 Human Physiology in Health and Disease

This course is intended for the non-science major. It addresses key concepts in physical and biological sciences using human physiology as the platform. Students will learn fundamental laws of science, science methodology, and sufficient science content to enhance their ability to evaluate arguments surrounding current issues related to human physiology in health and disease. Lecture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HESC 210 Human Anatomy

(Same as BIOL 210.) Corequisite, HESC 210L. An introduction to the study of human structure. The human body is studied from the following multiple levels of anatomical organization: cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and the intact organism. Emphasis is on the functional bases of anatomy. Lecture, laboratory. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

HESC 210L Human Anatomy Lab

(Same as BIOL 210L.) Corequisite, HESC 210. Lab component of HESC 210. Fee: $125. (Offered every semester.) 0 credits.

HESC 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

HESC 310 International Approaches to Health

Prerequisite, health science major. Course addresses key factors in planning and implementation of health-related programs, both globally and in domestic cross-cultural settings. Issues addressed: health beliefs and behaviors, sustainability of remedial health practices and impact on mortality and morbidity. Emphasis on analytical thinking and writing. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HESC 329 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in undergraduate studies. May be repeated for credit if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HESC 350 Applied Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 204L, 210, 210L, CHEM 140, 140L, and BIOL 365, or 366, 366L, and athletic training, or biochemistry and molecular biology, or biological sciences, or health sciences, or kinesiology major. Corequisite, HESC 350L. This course is designed for students pursuing majors in, health science, biological science, and kinesiology. Students will consider physiological systems as interrelated and interdependent and will examine adaptations made by physiological systems when exposed to acute exercise stress. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

HESC 350L Applied Exercise Physiology Lab

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 204L, 210, 210L, CHEM 140, 140L, and BIOL 365, or 366, 366L, and athletic training, or biochemistry and molecular biology, or biological sciences, or health sciences, or kinesiology major. Corequisite, HESC 350. Lab Course taken with HESC 350. (Offered spring semester.) 0 credits.

HESC 357 Seminar in Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Health Sciences

Prerequisite, junior standing. The course introduces interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to health care problem solving at micro (individual) and macro (societal) levels. Exploring current health problems and priorities in the U.S., we discover how multidisciplinary health care teams function to address diagnostic, prevention, care and treatment issues. Students observe how the various health sciences use knowledge and evidence to assess the outcomes of their efforts. Students investigate a current problem in health science and health care, working together using a variety of different disciplinary perspectives and methods. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HESC 365 Human Physiology Part A

(Same as BIOL 365.) Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 204L. Students learn how physiological systems function in isolation and as part of linked systems. Emphasis on cell physiology and endocrine, immune, nervous, and reproductive systems. Lecture. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HESC 366 Human Physiology Part B

(Same as BIOL 366.) Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 204L. Corequisite, HESC 366L. Emphasis on cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, urinary, and GI systems. Lecture, laboratory. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

HESC 366L Human Physiology Part B Lab

(Same as BIOL 366L.) Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 204L. Corequisite, HESC 366. Lab component of HESC 366. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 0 credits.

HESC 370 Health Planning

Prerequisite, HESC 101. The purpose of this course is to give the student a better understanding of the current health care dialogue and understand how to become a patient centered health care provider. Student will become familiar with different aspects of planning health care services, study health care disparities in the US and become familiar with the key authors and thinkers surrounding the health care reform act of 2010. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HESC 385 Aging and Health

Prerequisite, HESC 101. The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between growing old and having health problems. We will examine health care economics and health services for older adults. We explore social issues and how they relate to aging and health as well as examine issues surrounding the end of life as it relates to old age (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HESC 490 Independent Internship

Internships give students the opportunity to earn academic credit while gaining practical work experience, an increased understanding of their chosen career field, job skills, self-confidence, and more. Increasingly important in today's competitive job market, internships give graduates an edge when they seek jobs, having had "real-world" experience. Positions are available in various disciplines and are offered year round. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

HESC 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

HESC 492 Capstone Seminar Internship in Health Sciences

Prerequisites, senior standing, successful completion (grade of C or higher) of all health science core courses. Students complement their 3 credit internship with a formal seminar. Seminar participants are organized into team to examine their real-world internship experiences from behavioral, social, and science perspectives of health and health care. Case studies are used to supplement student experiences and to promote a deeper understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of health care. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Kinesiology

KINE 160 Health Education

Students survey personal and community health problems, particularly as they relate to student life. Topics include stress management, mental health, nutrition, exercise, addiction, sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, infectious diseases, and major health concerns such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiac health will be discussed. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 162 First Aid and CPR

Successful completion enables students to receive certification cards for both First Aid and CPR from the American Red Cross. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

KINE 163 Lifeguard Training

Corequisite, KINE 162. The course includes instruction, and potential certification, in lifeguarding. Students must be able to swim 500 yards and retrieve a 10-pound brick from 7 feet of water. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

KINE 192 Introduction to Athletic Training and Sports Medicine

An overview of sports medicine topics including blood-borne pathogens, medical terminology, and sports-related injuries. Orthopedic topics include the pathology and basic treatment for injuries to the ankle, knee, hip, cervical spine, shoulder, and elbow. In addition, neurological injuries such as concussions are also detailed. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 250 Fundamentals of Kinesiology

Anatomical, physiological, neurological, biomechanical, and psychological foundational principles, which relate to human movement, are introduced. Each study unit will provide the student with a foundation to build upon for other major courses. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

KINE 260 Global Health

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The purpose of the course is to understand, analyze, and evaluate global health issues. The student will combine political, social and economic reasons for disease outbreak and international health emergencies in various regions of the world including Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 261 Women in Sport

Survey of women's historical and contemporary involvement with athletics and sport; the social, cultural, and developmental implications of sports participation for women. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 262 Social, Political and Economic Functions of the Olympics

The social, political and economic functions/influences of the Olympics will be explored and discussed. Historical analysis of the ancient and modern Games, International relations, amateurism, gender issues, doping/drug use, economic gains/losses, corporate sponsorships are only a few of the topics to be discussed. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 270 Statistics for Allied Health Sciences

Prerequisites, MATH 104, sophomore standing, or consent of instructor. This course covers hypothesis testing and statistical analysis using descriptive, inferential, parametric, and non-parametric types of statistics. Specific focus is also given to evidence-based medicine statistics including use of current best evidence to analyze decision-making in patient care. (Offered spring semester). 3 credits.

KINE 285 Sports Massage

Differentiate the use of sports massage between different techniques of myofascial release, orthopedic, clinical, neuromuscular, PNF/MET along with various other techniques implemented. Students will identify anatomy, physiology, kinesiology and biomechanical components involved with sports massage assessment and implementation. Fee: $75. (Offered interterm, alternate years.) 3 credits.

KINE 290 Independent Internship

Prerequisites, kinesiology major, consent of instructor. An independent internship related to kinesiology, in which, a student develops a learning contract in conjunction with both an on-site and faculty supervisor. 40 hours of observation/internship are required per credit hour. Up to three credits per internship site per semester may be earned. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

KINE 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

KINE 301 Applied Biomechanics

Prerequisites, BIOL 210, and kinesiology major, or minor. Corequisite, KINE 302. Anatomical and mechanical principles which relate to human movement are studied. Biomechanical characteristics of bone, articular cartilage, muscles, and nervous system proprioceptors are included. Special emphasis is placed upon the learning of joint structure and the relationship between joint axis and the corresponding force vectors that are applied to the joint. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 302 Applied Biomechanics Lab

Prerequisites, BIOL 210, and kinesiology major, or minor. Corequisite, KINE 301. Anatomical and mechanical principles, which relate to human movement, are studied. Specific focus on the applied skills related to biomechanical analysis, musculoskeletal system anatomy identification, gait assessment, and fitness assessment. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

KINE 306 Introduction to Performance Training for Athletes

Prerequisite, BIOL 210. Current theories and concepts of physical conditioning will be addressed through a practical and applied approach. Current trends and program designs are also discussed. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 324 Theory of Coaching

Prerequisite, kinesiology major, or minor. The intent of this course is to prepare the student for experience in youth, secondary school, or university level coaching through experiential learning and discussion of coaching theories, techniques, and legislation. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

KINE 329 Experimental Course

Prerequisites, TBD per topic. Corequisites, TBD per topic. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in undergraduate studies. Repeatable if course topic is different. Fee: TBD per topic. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

KINE 340 Science of Obesity

Prerequisites, FSN 200, and kinesiology major, or minor. Role of diet/exercise in weight loss and body weight maintenance is discussed. Topics include: metabolic and physiological changes during weight gain/loss, current trends in obesity, relationship between body weight and disease risk, comparison of popular diets, and recommendations for optimal weight loss and weight maintenance. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

KINE 345 Diet, Disease, and Exercise

Prerequisites, BIOL 211, or 365, and kinesiology major, or minor. Focus on the etiology of major degenerative diseases in our society and the role genetics, diet, and exercise play in their development, prevention, and treatment. Diseases covered include heart disease, cancer, non-insulin dependent diabetes, osteoporosis, and hypertension. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

KINE 360 Eastern Concepts of Health and Healing

Differences between western and eastern cultures in regard to physical, mental, and spiritual health of the individual are analyzed. Concepts which will be evaluated include: traditional medicine, osteopathic, chiropractic, naturopathic, body work, energy work, botanicals, aromatherapy, acupuncture, yoga, meditation, Aryuvedic medicine and other indigenous cultures. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 386 Leadership in a Team Setting

This course examines leadership from the theoretical and practical perspectives of sport/coaching or an organization/business). Topics may include inspiration, motivation, cultivation, team building and team-based/shared leadership involvement by the coach/team captain or owner/manager. Students explore the numerous, diverse dynamics of being part of a team or organization and as an individual. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

KINE 395 Complementary and Alternative Medicine Physical Modalities

Prerequisite, KINE 360. Identify basic differences between different CAM physical modalities and their different philosophical perspectives of implementation. CAM modalities evaluated by the student include thermotherapy, cryotherapy, electrical stimulation, lasers, magnetic therapy, acupressure, tai qi, yoga, meditation, aromatherapy, biofeedback, visual imagery, basic level herbal therapy among many others. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

KINE 406 Advanced Performance Training for Athletes

Prerequisites, KINE 306, and kinesiology major, or minor. This course is designed for students interested in being a conditioning professional. Current theories, trends and advanced programming of performance training for athletes will be addressed through a practical and applied approach. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

KINE 435 Motor Control and Learning

Prerequisites, BIOL 210, and BIOL 211, or 365, and kinesiology major. Analysis of the sensory, perceptual systems involved in neuromuscular performance and motor learning; and performance associated with emphasis on changing motor abilities across a life span. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

KINE 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisites, kinesiology major, consent of instructor. An independent internship related to kinesiology, in which, a student develops a learning contract in conjunction with both an on-site and faculty supervisor. 40 hours of observation/internship are required per credit hour. Up to three credits per internship site per semester may be earned. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

KINE 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

KINE 498 Capstone Seminar in Kinesiology

Prerequisites, KINE 301, 340, and kinesiology major. This capstone course will review program areas with the major. Students will also collaborate to utilize current peer-reviewed literature to develop a capstone project related to their emphasis area. This project will be presented to members of the university and/or professional community. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Psychology

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

PSY 101 is prerequisite to all other courses in psychology. Introduction to the theories, principles, processes, problems, methods, and applications of psychology. In addition to attendance at lectures, students are required to serve as participants in course-relevant research or to complete a project of similar length and content. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

PSY 201 Critical Thinking

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Students explore methods of empirical and theoretical evaluation of psychological facts, assertions, research studies, and theories. The course focuses on the development of a critical thinking paradigm, which will reduce the probability of common errors of thinking. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 202 History and Systems of Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Discussion and evaluation of psychology's historical roots and the influences and people that have contributed to its present form. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 203 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, MATH 104, proficiency in pre-calculus mathematics as evidenced by the appropriate placement exam score available through the Department of Mathematics. The course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, the rationale of hypothesis testing, a survey of the common parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, and the calculation and interpretation of statistical indices and applications. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 204 Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, or equivalents with consent of instructor. Corequisite, PSY 204L. An introduction to the principles and procedures involved in behavioral sciences research emphasizing the scientific method and its application to psychological inquiry. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

PSY 204L Lab for Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, or equivalents with consent of instructor. Corequisite, PSY 204. An introduction to the procedures involved in conducting and analyzing behavioral science research. Students will complete projects ranging from survey research to research using perceptuomotor apparatus. (Offered every semester.) 0 credits.

PSY 290 Intern Program

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

PSY 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PSY 299 Individual Study

Prerequisites, PSY 101, consent of instructor, academic advisor, chair, 3.000 or higher grade point average. Supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area of psychology. Open to lower-division students majoring in psychology. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–6 credits.

PSY 304 Advanced Research Design

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, 204. This course will provide a comprehensive and systematic examination of advanced research methods and statistical procedures applied to the empirical evaluation of human behavior. Students will evaluate quantitative vs qualitative designs, within-participant vs between-participant designs, and single-variable vs factorial designs, as well as non-experimental designs, such as surveys. The course goal is to support the development of a precise and complete research proposal commensurate with professional standards and suitable to support a Capstone Senior Thesis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 310 Psychology of Learning

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An examination of the theoretical and methodological foundations of human learning. Emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the major learning paradigms and on the application of learning principles. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 315 Sensation and Perception

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the sensory nervous system and the perceptual basis of human experience. General topics include psychophysics and the physiology of the sensory systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the interaction between the anatomy of the sensory system and the transduction of sensory stimuli into meaningful perceptional experiences. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 317 Cognitive Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Examines the neural basis for cognition beginning with attention and spans the breadth of cognitive processes to include memory, learning, language, reasoning, and problem solving. Students learn how our minds absorb, store, and manipulate information from the world to solve problems, make decisions, comprehend language, produce art, and laugh at jokes. Students are encouraged to think critically and develop questions about their own cognitive processes. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 319 Motivation and Emotion

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the theoretical, physiological, and behavioral constructs underlying the processes of motivation and emotion. Emphasis is placed on methods for studying motivation and emotion and their role in human behavior. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 322 Theories of Personality

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An evaluative review of the major theories of personality. Emphasis is placed on personality structure, dynamics, behavior, and development of the normal and abnormal personality. Theories include psychodynamic, cognitive, somatic, behavioral, social learning, and humanistic explanations for human behavior and their differential implications for psychology. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 323 Child Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101, psychology major. This course is for psychology majors and covers the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains of development from conception through adolescence. The course consists of a lecture and a laboratory component. Lectures introduce major theories and research strategies in child development and integrates applied aspects such as parenting and teaching children. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 326 Child Psychology and Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. This course is for liberal studies students and other non–psychology majors and covers the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains of development from conception through adolescence. Lectures introduce major theories and research strategies in child development and integrate applied aspects such as parenting and teaching children. Classroom theories of child development and methods of interacting with children will be applied in context. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 327 Life Span Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major theories, concepts, and research methods in life–span developmental psychology. Students will learn to understand cognitive, emotional, and social development and changes across the entire life span from infancy to late adulthood. This course examines the biological and environmental foundations of development including cross–cultural issues and highlights empirical research to integrate theoretical and applied perspectives. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 328 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An overview of the field of abnormal psychology, which is the application of methods, principles, and findings from psychological research to understand, classify, and treat “abnormal” behavior and psychologically–based human suffering. Topics of lectures, discussions, and video presentations provide an integrative overview of current approaches to classification, assessment, and treatment of psychological disorders and mental illness. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 329 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 330 Child Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisites, PSY 101, and either 323, 326, or 327, or concurrent enrollment. This course reviews the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological and development disorders in children and adolescents. This course is likely to benefit all students who are interested in interacting with children and adolescents, as well as students considering careers involving children and youth with emotional and behavioral problems. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 333 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An investigation of the relationship between brain and behavior. Students will study the structure and function of the nervous system, including the biological bases of psychopathology and normal function. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 336 Social Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the scientific study of how groups and individuals interact. Cognition, feelings, impressions, and attitudes influence and are influenced by the presence of others according to the precepts of Social Psychology. Topics include manipulation and influence tactics, persuasion, attraction, aggression, altruism, self–concept, stereotypes, and cognition and behavioral congruence. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 340 Human Sexuality

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the physiological, psychological, and sociocultural factors influencing healthy human sexual expression. Emphasis is placed on gender identity, sex roles, variations in sexual behavior, love and attraction, and basic treatments for sexual dysfunction. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 341 Cross–Cultural Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the major issues and terminology used in cross–cultural psychology, which uses models and research methods from psychology, anthropology, and sociology. The course emphasizes a comparative approach. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 344 Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

A systematic study of the psychological issues affecting lesbians, gay men, and bisexual individuals in American society. The course integrates the most recent research-based information with life experiences of lesbian/gay/bisexual people in such areas as conceptualization and origin of sexual orientation, lifespan development, psychosocial identity, relationships, internalized homophobia, parenting, and clinical services. Critical and controversial issues will be debated. The course emphasizes an affirmative approach and is appropriate for students of any sexual orientation. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 345 Sports Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An exploration of how psychological principles apply to the study and understanding of sports and related issues. Applicable for Psychology majors, Athletic Trainers majors, coaches, and anyone interested in analyzing sports topics from an advanced cognitive perspective. The course examines research from social, clinical, counseling, and experimental psychology as they relate to teamwork, cohesion, sports aggression, fan violence, motivation to achieve excellence, exercise adherence, and adult influences on child sports experiences. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 355 Diversity in Marital and Family Relationships

Prerequisite, PSY 101. This course will provide students with an overview of marriage and family relationships from a multicultural perspective. Basic theories and concepts in family life will be explored through a global lens including family development, gender and family relations, partner selection, marriage, parenting practices, divorce, remarriage, and issues in later life. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 360 Human Psychology: The Totalitarian Experience

This course addresses human responses to totalitarianism and focuses on political, sociological, and psychological perspective. Students explore a variety of psychological issues and questions associated with Germany and Europe and Nazi/fascist and communist legacies. Taught in Berlin at Chapman University's Berlin European Studies Program. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 395 Topic Courses in Psychological Process

Prerequisites, PSY 101, consent of advisor. An examination of selected topics in the area of psychological processes and the foundations of psychological understandings of human behavior. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

PSY 428 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 328. Overview of the profession and practice of clinical psychology. The course surveys the field's history, clinical training, assessment procedures, therapeutic interventions, research approaches, ethical and legal issues, areas of specialization (i.e. forensic, behavioral medicine, and child), and current issues and trends. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 432 Introduction to Psychological Assessment

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203. Concurrent enrollment of PSY 203, with consent of instructor. An introduction to test construction, standardization, validity, reliability. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of intelligence, interests, values, and personality in normal and challenged persons. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 433 Psychopharmacology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An in-depth examination of the behavioral and central nervous system effects of pharmacologic substance use and abuse and the application of such substances to the prevention and treatment of psychophysiological and psychopathological dysfunction. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 436 Health Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. A study of illness behavior and theories and applications of health psychology and behavioral medicine. The course explores models of wellness and illness, the mind-body relation, coping with acute and chronic stress, health–related anxiety, smoking cessation, weight control and dieting behavior, and psychosocial interventions for chronic diseases, as well as alternative medicine and managed health care provision models. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 437 Health and Well-Being

Prerequisite, PSY 101. A scientific and practical exploration of human strengths by examining the contributions of the science of psychology to physical health and well-being. The course examines the psychological and physical aspects that contribute to self-efficacy, resilience, personal achievement, mindfulness, and spirituality. By drawing on scientific studies and concepts and techniques of Western and Eastern medicine and psychology, the course explores behaviors that enhance both physical and mental health. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PSY 446 Children and Trauma

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 323, or 326, or equivalent, consent of instructor. This course reviews the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological trauma in children and adolescents. This course explores the influence of multiple factors of trauma that may lead to the emergence of childhood psychiatric disorders. This course provides a critical foundation for future training and education of students considering careers involving children with emotional and behavioral problems. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 461 Psychology of Music

(Same as MUS 461.)

PSY 481 Organizational Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the scientific study of how psychological principles, concepts, and research apply to our understanding of work and work behavior. The course incorporates information from business, sociology, psychology, and economics. Topics include psychological testing, personnel selection, work violence, advertising, conflict resolution, hiring, interviewing, team building, and leadership. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding one's strengths and weaknesses as they apply to different components of work. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PSY 482 Forensic Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An examination of the interaction of the legal field and psychology, with emphasis on criminality, profiling, juries, prisons, sentencing, and police officer selection and training. Current research in Forensic Psychology will also be addressed. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PSY 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisites, PSY 101, consent of faculty internship advisor, site internship advisor. Supervised independent experience in an approved setting where psychological services are provided and research is conducted. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PSY 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PSY 492 Fieldwork in Psychology

Prerequisites, PSY 101, consent of academic advisor, internship supervisor, chair. Supervised experience in an approved setting where psychological services are provided. Additional meetings, assigned readings, and written evaluations of related readings and the field experience are required. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

PSY 495 Topics in Applied Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An examination of selected topics of areas of application of psychological principles and processes. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 496 Senior Project: Individual Research

Prerequisites, senior standing, psychology major, PSY 101, 203, 204, and either PSY 304 or MATH 403, or equivalents, and consent of instructor supervising student’s research. Satisfaction of the major’s senior project requirement through the development and completion of an independent, innovative investigation in psychological science. The student will design, conduct, analyze, and formally report their study under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester). 3 credits.

PSY 497a Senior Thesis

Prerequisites, senior standing, psychology major, PSY 101, 203, 204, or equivalents and departmental approval. Satisfaction of the major’s senior project requirement through the development and quantitative testing of a psychological hypothesis culminating in a thesis. Students will use advanced literature search strategies, evaluate the quality of the literature, analyze data presented in the literature with the use of statistical software, and construct annotated summaries of the literature. In addition to completing directed assignments, students will provide a professional-level presentation of their topic and findings. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 497b Senior Thesis

Prerequisites, senior standing, psychology major, PSY 101, 203, 204, or equivalents and departmental approval. Satisfaction of the major’s senior project requirement through the development and quantitative testing of a psychological hypothesis culminating in a thesis. Students will use advanced literature search strategies, evaluate the quality of the literature, analyze data presented in the literature with the use of statistical software, and construct annotated summaries of the literature. In addition to completing directed assignments, students will provide a professional-level presentation of their topic and findings. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 498 Senior Seminar in Psychological Topics

Prerequisites, senior standing, psychology major, PSY 101, 203, 204, or equivalents with consent of instructor. Satisfaction of the major’s senior project requirement through the comprehensive in-depth review of a psychological topic by locating, analyzing, and interpreting the most important literature related to that topic. In addition to completing directed assignments, students will provide a professional-level presentation of their topic and findings. May be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, PSY 101, consent of instructor, academic advisor, chair, psychology major with 3.00 or higher GPA. Supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area of psychology. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.