University Programs

University Honors Program

Carmichael C. Peters, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director

The Chapman University Honors program is a broad interdisciplinary course of study based on great books and events from cultures around the world. Students and faculty concentrate on mutually critical exchanges between the classics of human cultures and the contemporary world. The goal of these dialogical exchanges is collaborative and intentional learning in which students and faculty together connect enduring and emerging ideas, drawing on shared texts, lectures, seminar discussions and cultural experiences.

Students in this university–wide program are required to complete a minimum of 25 credits. They select from a variety of courses in three main categories (human sciences, natural sciences and social sciences). During their first year in the program, Honors students enroll in the one credit course, Honors Forum and complete the Honors program with the three credit course, Honors Capstone.

Completion of the program satisfies the GE Inter/Multidisciplinary Cluster; select courses may also satisfy major and minor requirements or electives as well as GE requirements.

Applications are available online at www.chapman.edu/academics/honors.

admission to the program

A successful candidate for the University Honors program will exhibit a strong motivation for interdisciplinary studies and an enthusiastic commitment to learning. The purpose of the Honors program is less to recognize past academic accomplishments than to encourage continued intellectual development, to nurture a lifelong love of learning and to prepare each student for a personally fulfilling and socially responsible life during their college years at Chapman and beyond.

Applicants typically have a first–rate GPA and highly competitive SAT and ACT scores. Other criteria may include outstanding leadership and/or creative achievement, community involvement and a range of interests and experiences. The program best serves students who approach their education in a mature and responsible manner, which includes showing respect for others in the classroom as well as in the community at large. Acceptance to the program is limited. Students must submit a separate application for admission to the Honors program, in addition to applying for admission to the University. Students already at Chapman may also apply for admission, prior to accumulating 60 credits.

Once accepted, students are expected to be active participants in Honors activities and are required to attend the annual University Honors Conference on the first Saturday each May. All students who wish to complete the University Honors program, which culminates with a capstone seminar, must fulfill the requirements listed below.

required core courses

Nine courses must be completed to graduate in the Honors program: seven courses plus the one credit Honors Forum (during the first year in the program) and the Honors Capstone. Of the seven courses, at least one course must be taken in each of the three main categories (human sciences, natural sciences, social sciences). Transfer students with 60 credits or more prior to matriculation must complete six courses to graduate in the Honors program: four courses plus Honors Forum (during their first year in the program) and the Honors Capstone. Of the four courses, at least one must be taken in each of the three main categories. Nine credits, other than the capstone seminar, must be at the 300 level or above. Courses under multiple categories can only be assigned to one category.

honors forum

HON 230

Honors Forum

1

human sciences

HON 202

On Being Ethical in the World

3

HON 207

Darwin's Evolutionary Theory: The Science and the Controversy

3

HON 209

Death, Self and Society

3

HON 210

Monsters and Monstrosities

3

HON 215

Art and Anthropology

3

HON 216

Twilight of the Gods

3

HON 220

Disney: Gender, Race and Religion

3

HON 222

Honors Composition: Rhetorical Agency Across Genres

3

HON 240

Anime and War

3

HON 317

Visual Literacy in a Generation of Visible Surplus: Its Theory, Practice and Applications

3

HON 324

Modern Political Argument

3

HON 327

Revolution and Philosophy

3

HON 333

Creativity and the Human Condition

3

HON 334

Rhetorics of the Western World

3

HON 335

The Enigma of Being Awake: Zen Buddhism

3

HON 338

ThanaTourism: Traveling the "Dark Side"

3

HON 340

Social Justice: Mirage or Oasis

3

HON 341

Storytelling

3

HON 342

Memory, Media and Image

3

HON 344

Illustrating History/the World: Graphic Memoirs, Novels and Reportage

3

HON 347

Listening to Time: Area Studies in Ethnomusicology

3

HON 349

Discontented Culture: Fantasy, Intimacy and The Talking Cure

3

HON 359

Fundamentals of Deductive and Inductive Logic

3

HON 360

Performing Americas: Celebrating American Identities

3

HON 362

Philosophical Themes in the Films of Ingmar Bergman

3

HON 363

The Castaway Narrative in World Literature

3

HON 366

Deities and Demons: Ancient and Modern

3

HON 367

Pythagoras Revisited: A Quest for Interior Precision

3

HON 368

Community and Identity in Musical Theater

3

HON 369

Select Contemporary Problems: Religion and Politics

3

HON 371

The World of Fellini's Cinema

3

HON 372

MOOCs as Phenomenon

3

HON 373

The Puppet Metaphor Across Media

3

HON 374

Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Applications

3

HON 376

Sustainability in an Unsustainably Structured World

3

HON 377

Critical Animal Studies

3

HON 379

Philosophy Through Film

3

HON 381

Think for Yourself: From Socrates to Adorno

3

HON 385

Is big data enough? To be human among machines

3

HON 387

Food and Philosophy

3

HON 391

Close Reading

3

HON 396

The Politics of Waste

3

HON 409

Hermes Unbound: Divining Hermeneutics

3

HON 412

"Seas of Stories": Postcolonial Literature and Theory

3

HON 414

The Politics of Law

3

HON 416

Sex, Self, Society

3

HON 418

Critical Pedagogy: Teaching to Transgress

3

HON 419

The Search for an American Voice: Huck Finn to Harlem

3

HON 424

Magic, the Occult and Art in the Early Modern Period

3

HON 432

Queer Theory

3

HON 440

Up

3

natural sciences

HON 207

Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory: The Science and the Controversy

3

HON 208

Universal Geometry

3

HON 321

The New Mathematics of the Italian Renaissance

3

HON 331

The Ecology of Sustainable Food

3

HON 332

The Birth of Calculus: History of an Idea

3

HON 343

Introduction to Interdisciplinary Computational Science

3

HON 350

Scientific Prediction: Information, Technology and Progress

3

HON 364

Biology in Media and Reality

3

HON 367

Pythagoras Revisited: A Quest for Interior Precision

3

HON 372

MOOCs as Phenomenon

3

HON 374

Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Applications

3

HON 375

Environmental And Social Costs of Coffee

3

HON 376

Sustainability in an Unsustainably Structured World

3

HON 378

The Ecology, History, and Politics of California Ecosystems

3

HON 382

The Fabric of the Universe: Space, Time, and Reality

3

HON 383

Controversial Topics in Biology

3

HON 384

Ethical Implications of Biotechnology

3

HON 385

Is big data enough? To be human among machines

3

HON 389

The Science Blender

3

social sciences

HON 206

Media, Self and Society

3

HON 209

Death, Self and Society

3

HON 210

Monsters and Monstrosities

3

HON 215

Art and Anthropology

3

HON 220

Disney: Gender, Race and Religion

3

HON 240

Anime and War

3

HON 275

Thinking and Risk Taking from Outside the Box

3

HON 311

Ethnicity, Race and Nationalism

3

HON 324

Modern Political Argument

3

HON 325

Democracy and Its Enemies

3

HON 327

Revolution and Philosophy

3

HON 337

Credit, Growth, and Economic Cycles

3

HON 338

ThanaTourism: Traveling the "Dark Side"

3

HON 339

Body, Flesh, Subject

3

HON 340

Social Justice: Mirage or Oasis

3

HON 342

Memory, Media and Image

3

HON 344

Illustrating History/the World: Graphic Memoirs, Novels and Reportage

3

HON 345

Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy

3

HON 357

Foundations of Economic Exchange

3

HON 360

Performing Americas: Celebrating American Identities

3

HON 366

Deities and Demons: Ancient and Modern

3

HON 369

Select Contemporary Problems: Religion and Politics

3

HON 372

MOOCs as Phenomenon

3

HON 373

The Puppet Metaphor Across Media

3

HON 375

Environmental And Social Costs of Coffee

3

HON 376

Sustainability in an Unsustainably Structured World

3

HON 377

Critical Animal Studies

3

HON 378

The Ecology, History, and Politics of California Ecosystems

3

HON 385

Is big data enough? To be human among machines

3

HON 393

Tricksters and Cosmopolitans

3

HON 396

The Politics of Waste

3

HON 408

Alternative Approaches to Political Understanding

3

HON 412

"Seas of Stories": Postcolonial Literature and Theory

3

HON 414

The Politics of Law

3

HON 418

Critical Pedagogy: Teaching to Transgress

3

HON 416

Sex, Self, Society

3

HON 424

Magic, the Occult and Art in the Early Modern Period

3

HON 432

Queer Theory

3

other categories

HON 230

Honors Forum

1

HON 329

Experimental Course

3

HON 395

Topics in Honors

3

HON 399

Individual Study

½–6

HON 499

Individual Study

½–6

 

semester–long study abroad course

3

senior seminar

HON 498

Honors Capstone Seminar

3

total credits

minimum of 25

Course Descriptions – Honors

HON 202 On Being Ethical in the World

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course surveys the history of ethics, with particular attention to the history of philosophical approaches to ethics as well as to the process of moral decision-making in major religious traditions. These philosophical and religious perspectives are then critically examined in light of some contemporary moral problems. Among the moral problems considered are abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, sexuality and marriage, the moral status of animals, and the environment. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 206 Media, Self and Society

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. An analysis of mass media as a social institution. This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the origins, history, evolution, and social functions of the mass media. It addresses the impact of the media on the social self. Though it addresses the transitions from oral to print to electronic media the emphasis is on the electronic media and its impact on the social construction of reality. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 207 Darwin's Evolutionary Theory: The Science and the Controversy

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will address the topic Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection and its place in scientific thought, and explore the controversy surrounding it for many in the general public. We will explore the options for finding comfort with both the science of evolution and one’s personal religious beliefs. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 208 Universal Geometry

Prerequisite, MATH 104, or equivalent, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Students will learn elements of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries in the context of axiomatic systems. The main objective of this course is to help students develop quantitative and logical skills of mathematical reasoning. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 209 Death, Self and Society

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Students participate in an interdisciplinary investigation of death, dying, and the grieving process. Topics include: The American way of death as a social institution, dying as a psychological process, how society conditions us to deny death and repress grief, how students relate to their own death, and the death of significant others. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 210 Monsters and Monstrosities

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will investigate and interpret the stories we construct about ourselves and the Other by exploring works from east/west involving the vampire, the specter, and the witch. We will particularly focus on cultural, literary, and political representations from various periods and locations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 215 Art and Anthropology

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will use anthropological approaches to analyze artistic movements and the ideological construction of "art" itself as cultural constructs. It will take both western and non-western art as its subject, situating them within larger issues of taste, class, politics, identity, and economy. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 216 Twilight of the Gods

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course examines the history of thought on agnosticism, atheism, and skepticism by studying a selection of classical writings from some of the most celebrated thinkers in the West - from Lucretius to Carl Sagan. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 218 Social Movement in the Sixties

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program. Through film, literature and direct commune-experimentation this course will be a fresh look, with beginner’s eyes, at the 60’s: that most outrageous decade, that most idealized and despised decade, that most creative and anarchic decade. The course is structured around Theodore Roszak’s The Making of a Counter-Culture and the PBS 6-part documentary Making Sense of the 60s. We will examine the cultural trance we are caught up in, in reference to social movements and social change. As a culture, our definition of social change has been deeply inhabited by a belief in progress, achievement, betterment. Change was progress, especially economic and technical progress. The social movements of the 60’s counter-culture contested that concept of social change and have provoked a change in our concept of social change itself. We will be looking at social movements and social change on a personal, societal, and global-planetary level. We will be examining our values in reference to change and in reference to politics, democracy and freedom—particularly whether those values come consciously out of our understanding or unconsciously out of our conditioning. We will contrast the movements and forces at work in the 60’s youth with the movements and forces at work in today’s youth. Education is a journey, not a destination, hence students will be highly encouraged to integrate their formal book reading with their direct, personal, on-the-spot life experiences. There will be various “exploriments” and “exercises” designed to provoke us into doing sociology rather than merely learning about it. Our dominant, established educational tradition is that your acquire knowledge through collecting stuff and knowing it—especially for exams. We will attempt to contest the authority of that tradition and celebrate thinking, experiencing, and creating rather than collecting, memorizing, and grading. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 220 Disney: Gender, Race and Religion

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course examines Disney’s portrayal of gender, sexuality, race, and religion by employing interdisciplinary methods such as cultural criticism, narrative criticism, feminist theory, and deconstruction to animated film and related products. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 222 Honors Composition: Rhetorical Agency Across Genres

Prerequisite, acceptance to University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Honors Composition prepares students to write effectively in response to on-going academic discussions in a number of different genres. This class is about writers learning to “situate” themselves in relation to texts and ideas, learning to analyze for rhetorical effect, and writing through those processes. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 230 Honors Forum

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The Honors Forum meets once a week to familiarize students with the academic and social dimensions of the University Honors Program. Required for all incoming and transfer students during their first year at Chapman, and open to all Honors students. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

HON 240 Anime and War

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Japanese animation or anime has become much more popular in the United States over the last three decades, and today Japan State policy sees the medium as an important “cultural asset.” However anime is not new, nor is it a medium exclusive to Japan. One might even argue that many technologies of visual animation pre-date its live-action cinematic cousin. As Paul Virilio and others have argued, the history of both animated and live-action film are intimately related to the parallel histories of 20th century warfare. This course will trace the development of mid- and late-20th century Japanese animated films in terms of their relationship to war. Analyzing Japanese films on historical, narrative, diegetic, and formal levels, we will consider relations among image production and viewing, in terms of economic, cultural, social, and political parameters. Readings will include classic theoretical texts on war and cinema, as well as more recent historical and sociological readings specific to Japanese and Pacific contexts. This course will focus upon the following four sub-units; 1) animation theory and modern Japanese visual history 2) the Pacific War and politics of memory 3) the Cold War, ideological alliances, and cultural-economic empires and lastly 4) animated projections and the War on Terror. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 242 Beyoncé, Madonna, Nina Simone

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. In a New York Times conversation following Beyoncé’s explosive 2016 Superbowl performance, critic Wesley Morris suggested that Beyoncé “lands somewhere between” Madonna and Nina Simone. This course brings these three artists from different generations together, situating their work historically, within contemporary critical discussions around race/gender/sexuality and cultural appropriation, and in dialogue with one another. The course offers a cultural studies-based examination of the work of the three artists; our method is not primarily sociological or biographical, though relevant biographical and sociological evidence may inform our analysis. We listen to the music of the three artists, watch their music videos, and read scholarship in critical race studies and feminist cultural criticism. Students develop collaborative oral presentations on each of the three artists and a final critical or creative mashup or disentangling of Beyoncé /Madonna/Nina Simone. Discussion-based seminar. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 275 Thinking and Risk Taking from Outside the Box

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program. The object of this course will be to first get an understanding of what it is to be an in the box thinker, and doer, and why it’s a good thing to be an in the box thinker. Why the world requires that most thinking is done within the box. Second we will pursue understanding what it means to challenge the status quo. We will evaluate preconceived ideas, and consider alternatives. Third, we will discuss the pros and cons of risk taking, and how to deal with failure and success. Fourth, we will discuss the utility of, and what it means to think and create outside the box. For instance, the creation of a living, glow in the dark, pink unicorn. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 295 Freshman Bridge

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program. This course will consist of weekly activity-based classes comprised of introductory concepts about college life, success strategies, library use, exploration of programs and majors, career building, mapping 4-year plans, projecting forward upon graduation and to explore on-campus resources and the City of Orange. This course will be led and conducted by Chapman upperclassmen (Juniors and Seniors). (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

HON 311 Ethnicity, Race and Nationalism

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. All around us we see the rising tide of ethnic, racial, and national conflicts. From terrorist acts in New York City to war in Afghanistan, Bosnia, and Rwanda, we see people divided along ethnic, religious, and national identities. Is this inevitable? What are the possible causes and consequences of these conflicts? We will explore what we mean by identity and its various representations such as ethnic, religious, and national identities today. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 317 Visual Literacy in a Generation of Visible Surplus: Its Theory, Practice and Applications

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The generation of online social networking, competitive commerce, instantaneous global and local media, and excessive visual diversion is changing the way we filter, access, and understand the world around us. This course will explore the histories, theories, and strategies of visual literacy and apply them to personal experience as well as professional case studies, including business, social, political, and cultural applications. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 321 The New Mathematics of the Italian Renaissance

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The class is designed to explore the birth of new mathematics during the Italian Renaissance. On one hand painters and mathematicians invented perspective and projective geometry, building on the body of Greek geometry. On the other hand merchants, accountants, and mathematicians developed modern algebra, building on the existing body of Islamic algebra. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 324 Modern Political Argument

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program. An upper division seminar that combines the study of history, politics and rhetoric and examines key moments in the development of modern political argument. Close reading of writers who combined great ideas and artistic prose in the service of a political cause, beginning with examination of 17th and 18th century England and Ireland and the two giants of political argument: Jonathan Swift and Edmund Burke; continuing with early liberals Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas Paine and the call for a communist revolution from Karl Marx; and ending with modern reform liberalism and the libertarian ideas of F.A. Hayek and Barry Goldwater, the intellectual and rhetorical foundation for today’s Tea Party radicals. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HON 325 Democracy and Its Enemies

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of Honors Program Director. This Honors course considers the struggle between democracy and its critics from ancient Athens to today and the meaning of democracy as a political ideal. Tocqueville famously argued that democracy is central to America’s identity. Yet the meaning of the word is anything but simple. In the modern era, nearly everyone claims to be a democrat, but who are its true friends? The class begins with a meditation on the nature of political power. The course then examines the multiple definitions of democracy in the modern world and concludes with a consideration of possible reforms to improve American democracy in the twenty-first century. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 327 Revolution and Philosophy

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of Honors Program Director. Often inspired and preceded by great thinkers, revolutions shape the thinking of those who watch the flames. This course examines, in turn, four of the world’s great political revolutions – the English Revolution of 1640-1660 that unleashed the modern revolutionary in the personality of the Puritan zealots, the American Revolution sparked by civic republican ideas about civic virtue and corruption, the French Revolution of 1789, which, after being inspired by Rousseau, resulted in the Rights of Man, the terror and the rise of Napoleon, and the Russian Revolution of 1917 which could not have taken place without the writings of Marx and leadership of Lenin. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 329 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 331 The Ecology of Sustainable Food

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will address the topic of sustainability of our global food supply. We will explore the concepts of sustainable food production and critically evaluate issues such as the environmental impacts of our food choices, the role or organic food and locally grown food, and controversial food technologies. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 332 The Birth of Calculus: History of an Idea

Prerequisites, MATH 104, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Calculus is the greatest achievement of western civilization, but students study it within the confines of the mathematical curriculum, and thus regard it as a technical tool for the solution of mathematical problems. This course will focus on its intellectual significance and its historical developments. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 333 Creativity and the Human Condition

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will explore the human creative process as it has developed in various cultures around the globe throughout history. Representative works from many disciplines will be examined with an emphasis placed on how various historical, environmental, philosophical, sociological, and biological factors have helped to shape creative thought and the expression of the human condition. This course is writing intensive. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 334 Rhetoric of the Western World

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Through this course, students will engage with major themes and epistemologies in the history of Rhetoric. Beginning with the pre-Socratics and ending with post-modernism, students will explore the theoretical shifts and major figures that define a modern study of Rhetoric. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 335 The Enigma of Being Awake: Zen Buddhism

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will involve a three-part study: 1) we will explore the history of Buddhism in general and Zen Buddhism in particular, 2) we will investigate the central concept of anatta, along with attendant Buddhist concepts and critically examine the Zen claim of immediacy, and 3) we will experimentally engage in dharma practices employed by Zen. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 337 Credit, Growth, and Economic Cycles

Prerequisite, acceptance into the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course examines the interaction between credit and economic development, the impact of limitations of existing credit systems over the past millennium, responses undertaken to alleviate observed weaknesses of the credit system, and the tendency for the economy to grow and contract with credit cycles. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 338 ThanaTourism: Traveling the “Dark Side”

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will focus on diverse travel narratives, literary works, and theoretical approaches to investigate the increasing allure of various tourist and historical sites that are associated with collective traumas and that raise questions about memory, commemoration, and exploitation. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 339 Body, Flesh, Subject

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course analyzes emerging political and ethical considerations of the body – how we care for and how we interpret the body – in contemporary visual culture. We consider how technology has intervened on our understanding of the ‘natural’ body and subsequent influences on our construction of self and other. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 340 Social Justice: Mirage or Oasis

Prerequisites, acceptance into the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Also, the disposition to be challenged and to wrestle with new ideas. This course attempts to clarify our understanding of the pervasive and yet obscure concept of social justice in the modern world. F.A. Hayek contends that the concept, despite well-meaning intentions, is meaningless, incoherent, and harmful to the prosperity of a free society. David Miller argues that when considered contextually the principles of desert, need, and equality can be used to delineate a theory of social justice as a viable political ideal. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 341 Storytelling

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. How important is storytelling to our daily lives? What can improving one’s storytelling actually achieve? Using multiple approaches, we explore storytelling as an essential mode of human connectivity with a central focus on improving storytelling skills. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 342 Memory, Media and Image

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. It is getting harder and harder to retain, separate and protect a sense of our private self. Digital identities ask that we archive a very visual public self and this complicates our traditional narratives of memory. This course explores the contemporary tensions between media, memory and image. It examines the concept of archive and its relationship to memory by engaging with topics of trauma, voice, repression and power. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 343 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Computational Science

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of Honors Program Director. Computational science is an emerging interdisciplinary field of all the sciences, combined with computer science, and mathematics. This course is to provide the fundamentals of computational as applies to experimental sciences, and introduce a variety of scientific applications. We will examine how scientific investigations involve experiment as well as computing in basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, global change, medicine and particularly biosciences. The student will be offered examples of experimental data, computer simulations, and data analysis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 344 Illustrating History/the World: Graphic Memoirs, Novels, and Reportage

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will explore the ways in which history and culture, the “Other” and the “Self,” are conveyed and/or challenged through visual texts, such as graphic memoirs, novels, and reportage. We will examine the relationship between text and image as well as the efficacy of representing individual and collective histories and experiences in “comic” form. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 345 Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy explores the causes and effects of illegal immigration, legal responses to immigration, challenges faced by immigrant communities, challenges faced by states and localities with high immigrant populations, the development and implementation of refugee law, and human trafficking. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 347 Listening to Time: Area Studies in Ethnomusicology

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course examines various musical traditions from non-western cultures. Topics are approached with an emphasis on the sociohistorical climate at the time of each tradition’s inception and throughout the path of its evolution. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 349 Discontented Culture: Fantasy, Intimacy and The Talking Cure

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Our lives are constantly engaged with negotiating conflict between our inner self and outer world. Why does trauma hold our cultural and individual attentions so readily? Why is talking and hearing about ourselves so seductive? We use 3 core psychoanalytic concepts as a methodology for cultural analysis against examples from popular culture (film, novels, music) - to ultimately ask are we contented only through our discontent? (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 350 Scientific Prediction: Information, Technology and Progress

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course examines the philosophy and techniques for creating forecasts and making predictions. Historical context of prediction is discussed. Qualitative and quantitative techniques are covered. Traditional quantitative methods and probabilistic approaches will be applied. Evaluation of forecast accuracy and its implications are considered. Prediction applications include, but are not limited to economics, science, social science, business, sports and weather. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 359 Fundamentals of Deductive and Inductive Logic

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. A study of methods to distinguish good and bad reasoning. Students will learn how to “translate” natural language arguments into formal languages of sentential and predicate logic, to construct proofs in the language, and to understand the semantics (or model theory) for the language. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 360 Performing Americas: Celebrating American Identities

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. As a public platform, the stage has long been a site for expressing or challenging individual, national, or group identities. Students will examine primary materials including plays, vaudeville, minstrel, and circus entertainments from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries, in conjunction with multidisciplinary critical and theoretical scholarship, to develop an understanding of the history of U.S. performance as a tool for political and social agency. (Offered as needed) 3 credits.

HON 362 Philosophical Themes in the Films of Ingmar Bergman

Prerequisite, acceptance into the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The films of Ingmar Bergman offer a range of jumping-off points for some traditional debates in philosophy in areas such as the philosophy of religion, ethics, and value theory more broadly. Bergman’s oeuvre also offers an entry point for a critical examination of existentialism. This course will investigate some of the philosophical questions posed and positions raised in these films within an auteurist framework. We will also examine the legitimacy of the auteurist framework for film criticism and the representational capacity of film for presenting philosophical arguments. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 363 The Castaway Narrative in World Literature

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. While stories of drift and survival at sea are certainly as old as humanity’s first attempts to float, the literary and cultural form of castaway narrative has its own history that is tied directly to the world-historical conditions of trans-oceanic travel and the accompanying geo-political relations between colony and colonizer. It is therefore possible to also see the castaway narrative, not as simply the result of any national cultural development, but instead a literary form that emerges simultaneously in various sites of cultural production. From a historical perspective, we might argue that the castaway narrative emerges throughout the globe at the very moment that circumnavigation is made possible and thus can be read an important transnational literary form in which competing ideas and visions of the newly imagined world are proposed and contested. As such, these stories of survival at sea, tend to also be fascinating ideological texts that allow us to see the interplay between concrete world historical conditions and more abstract categories of language, geography, ethnography, race, gender, and national identity. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 364 Biology in Media and Reality

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. An introduction to advanced-level critical inquiry, focusing on basic understanding of biological principles and how they are depicted in news and media. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 366 Deities and Demons: Ancient and Modern

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Embark on a journey to ancient Mesopotamia through an examination of myths and rituals from the "cradle of civilization." Our journey moves thematically through the literature exploring creation, afterlife, deities, magic, witchcraft, sexuality, and gender roles, with special attention to modern expressions of these ancient themes. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 367 Pythagoras Revisited: A Quest for Interior Precision

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program. Can precision and quantitative reasoning be integral parts of spirituality and introspection? How do we express a contemplative experience that does not renounce to exacting discrimination of inner and outer phenomena? In this course we will move at the intersection of mathematics, literature, philosophy and religion, to find possible answers to these questions. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 368 Community and Identity in Musical Theater

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Works of musical theater (Broadway musicals, film musicals, operas), created by the coming together of multiple disciplines, are explored through several interdisciplinary lenses, to uncover their function as community-builders and their role as definers of identity (including race, gender, orientation, class, [dis]ability) in society. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 369 Select Contemporary Problems: Religion and Politics

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Examination of current issues involving the interaction and conflict of religious beliefs and practices with the political process. Topics addressed include, but are not limited to: gay marriage, physician assisted suicide and religious expression and practice in the context of school, government or public settings. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 371 The World of Fellini's Cinema

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course investigates the work of the Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini, including both the aesthetic innovations of his films and the cultural and philosophic context surrounding them. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 372 MOOCs as Phenomenon

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. MOOCs (massive open online courses) hit the world stage in 2012. In this course, we will examine MOOCs from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will review the learning theory underlying MOOCs and will assess this theory for adequacy. We will inquire whether there is an ideology implicit in the creation and promulgation of MOOCs, given their genesis at elite American universities. We will examine the curricular and financial implications of MOOCs for postsecondary education, both in the US and internationally. In addition to other course requirements, each student will be required to receive a certificate of completion from two distinct MOOCs* on two distinct MOOC platforms, one in a subject that the student has studied in the context of a face-to-face course and one in a subject new to the student. One of these certificates of completion may be for work completed prior to this course. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 373 The Puppet Metaphor Across Media

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. This course investigates the theoretical and historical significance of the myth of the puppet by examining its cultural history and its life across media boundaries. The coursework traces the evolution of influential European, and especially Italian, puppets and puppeteering traditions comparatively with other types of theatre of animation around the world, from Renaissance theatre to avant-garde literature, film, and digital media. This course also addresses the archetype of the transformation from animate to inanimate in literature and cinema, including the theme of the cyborg. Readings and lectures provide historical background and dialogue with recent theories of theatricality, intermediality, and post-human. Through class discussions, presentations and critical papers, students will analyze a number of literary, cinematographic and digital texts that intersect with puppetry in various ways. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 374 Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Applications

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Through a chronological review of contemporary philosophical positions, students will critique the social construction of science. In the problem-based intellectual engagement, students will explore how science is practised and how scientific progress is attained in different fields. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 375 Environmental And Social Costs of Coffee

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. Coffee is ubiquitous in our lives. This course will examine the environmental impacts and political economy of coffee. Students will follow coffee as it moves from production into the global market and will explore the implications for its consumption in terms of sustainability and culture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 376 Sustainability in an Unsustainably Structured World

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. The students will be introduced to the fundamentals of sustainability including historic background, population trends, pollution control laws and regulations, carbon footprints, climate change impacts, ozone depletion, elements of life cycle assessments, and evaluating issues associated with fossil fuels and green energy/renewable energy sources. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 377 Critical Animal Studies

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. How and when did animals come to be distinguished from humans? What other kinds of relationship to/with animals might we develop? What does the representation of animals in cultural productions suggest about the world views of the producers and consumers of those productions? This course engages with these and other related questions through in-depth study of the interdisciplinary field of Critical Animal Studies. Students engage with key articles, films, and books in Critical Animal Studies, and produce their own creative and critical projects in response. Discussion-based seminar. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 378 The Ecology, History and Politics of California Ecosystems

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. California is a biodiversity hotspot with a number of distinctive ecosystems from deserts to kelp forests, and redwoods to skyscrapers. This course will explore the ecology of several California ecosystems, the historical, current and future impacts of humans on ecosystems, the political and social issues surrounding resource extraction in California, and recent conservation efforts. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 379 Philosophy Through Film

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor, and Honors Director. An underlying assumption of this course is that some films can be interpreted as an attempt to provide an answer to a classic question in philosophy. We will investigate a range of feature films running the gamut from Hollywood blockbusters such as Inception to art house classics such as The Seventh Seal to experimental films such as Koyaanisqatsi. In addition to the films, we will read from primary sources, and explore the philosophical issues as addressed in both the films and the texts. While our main concern will be examining some classic debates in philosophy on such topics as the nature of the individual, our knowledge of the world, and our relationship to one another (both ethical and political), we will also consider the relative merits of film versus text in presenting philosophical arguments. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 381 Think for Yourself: From Socrates to Adorno

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Director of Honors. This course analyzes texts that deal with the philosophical and literary concepts of the ideal individual, emphasizing reason and individualism rather than tradition. It covers selected periods from Classical Antiquity to the 20th Century. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 382 The Fabric of the Universe: Space, Time, and Reality

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor and Honors Director. Did you ever wonder what is the arena of our physical Reality, what is the Shape of the Universe, or what is the Arrow of Time? Through concrete examples and engaging exercises that teach mind-expanding ideas in an intuitive and informal way, we will learn connections between Geometry and recent developments in Cosmology. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 383 Controversial Topics in Biology

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. An introduction to advanced-level critical inquiry, focusing on the biological topics that create controversy and how they are depicted in news and media. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 384 Ethical Implications of Biotechnology

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course looks at the science and ethical controversies behind biotechnologies such as genetic engineering, designer babies, stem cell research, 3-D printing, mechanistic augmentations, and immortality. The scientific steps of these biological methodologies will be taught, and extensively examined using different moral philosophies such as Natural Law (Aquinas), Nietzsche, Utilitarianism (Mills), Deontology (Kant), and Buddhism. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 385 Is big data enough? To be human among machines

In this course we will explore the computational and philosophical concepts underpinning the use of large collections of data to solve problems. We will ask whether it is possible to preserve our humanity, and a role for our reason, when so much of what we understand and what we decide is ultimately shaped by data-driven algorithms. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 387 Food and Philosophy

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of Honors Program Director. This course uses the analytical tools of philosophy to understand one of the most fundamental elements of human experience: food. The course draws on interdisciplinary sources, experiential engagement, and community service to enrich our understanding of producing, cooking, eating, and sharing food. Topics covered include philosophy of sensory experience, the relation between mind and body, gender, the ethics of consumption and distribution, food security and social justice, and others. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 389 The Science Blender

Prerequisites, acceptance to the University Honors Program, consent of instructor. In the Science Blender, teams composed of 5 students from disparate majors within Schmid and the Honors program will be coalesced around "grand challenge" projects designed to leverage their growing individual (disciplinary) knowledge bases, skill sets, and problem-solving abilities. As the teams delve deeply into their projects, identify the current knowledge gaps that prevent simple solutions to the grand challenges, and then develop strategies to address those gaps, the students will become more conversant in the languages of the different disciplines and will develop a highly sophisticated appreciation for how team-based problem solving can have a maximal impact on a specific scientific pursuit. Instruction and discussion will be augmented with frequent participation of guest speakers who will serve as mentors and guides for the student teams. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 391 Close Reading

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course focuses on small and subtle elements in a wide range of texts. Specific texts vary by semester but generally include a mix of visual images, television commercials, music videos, short films, short stories, op-ed pieces, stageplays, and feature-length films. In considering all of these texts, the objective is to delve into the details, observing and analyzing aspects of the text that often go unnoticed and unexamined. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 392 Adventures in Cosmologies

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. ADVENTURES IN COSMOLOGIES (with deference to Whitehead’s Adventures of Ideas, 1933). Structure: The Ancient Greeks, The Renaissance, The Enlightenment, The 19th Century, The 20/21st Centuries, "Had we never seen the stars, and the sun, and the heaven, none of the words which we have spoken about the universe would ever have been uttered. But now the sight of day and night, and the months and the revolutions of the years, have created number, and have given us a conception of time, and the power of inquiring about the nature of the universe; and from this source we have derived philosophy, than which no greater good ever was or will be given by the gods to mortal man." (Plato, Timaeus, my emphasis, in Ferris p19). (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 393 Tricksters and Cosmopolitans

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course explores U.S. narrative fiction in the twentieth century, approaching the figures of tricksters and cosmopolitans within the literary works and in the process of literary production. Writers include Charles Chesnutt, Sui Sin Far, Nella Larsen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Philip Roth, Timothy Yu, and Edwidge Danticat. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 395 Topics in Honors

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This is a special topics course to provide additional opportunities to explore subjects of special interest. Each topic will have a specific syllabi and bibliography. May be repeated for credit provided the course content is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 395a Kotkin Presidential Fellow Seminar: The History of Cities: From Origins to the Ephemeral City

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. A study of the evolution of the city across eras and cultures, including a focus on the formation of downtowns and suburbs; topics such as urban poverty, the concept of the "village," and class issues. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 395b Kotkin Presidential Fellow Seminar: New Media

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course, designed to develop expertise in online media as the dominant form of contemporary public discourse, will focus on Internet-based publications, and will include guidance on the use of video, journalistic writing, and graphics to address an array of audiences and communities. Most class sessions will be spent devoted to "hands on" expertise by working on real projects for and at real sites, to gain understanding of the new-media-driven shift in journalism and public exchange and to enhance new-media communication skills. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 395e Kotkin Presidential Fellow Seminar: A History of the Future for Commerce

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The purpose of this course is to understand the trajectory of history and historical models which can be applied to understand the future. We will focus in particular on historical models that provide insight into the future of business and the associated implications for entrepreneurs and managers. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 396 The Politics of Waste

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The Politics of Waste is an interdisciplinary medical humanities course to be taught in the Honors Program. By waste, we are referring to effluent, garbage and industrial pollution. The medical humanities literature on world health points to sewer systems as one of the fundamental advances in terms of disease prevention in the 19th century. The field of medicine as well identifies water-based flush toilets as a major medical achievement. The history of these achievements however reveals the contested nature of eliminating waste from the environment. Our course has relevancy to current world challenges. Sewage disposal is a problem today for over 2.5 billion people who do not have access to proper sanitation. Numerous global initiatives such as the Gates Foundation’s “Reinvent the Toilet Challenge” continue to seek effective responses to this never-ending problem. This course’s outcome has value in informing a larger understanding of a worldwide concern and thus embodies the University’s goal of producing students who live “inquiring, ethical, and productive lives as global citizens.” This course examines – from perspectives of history, literature, psychology, politics and economics -- the various ways that humanity has struggled to both accommodate and marginalize the greatest taboo. Our course not only contributes to expanding the breadth and depth of medical humanities inquiry, but it also addresses a topic that remains a global problem today. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The student initiates and conducts an in-depth study or research in a specific area in conjunction with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

HON 409 Hermes Unbound: Divining Hermeneutics

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Reflections on Hermes, the messenger of the Greek gods, gave rise to hermeneutike, the art of interpretation. This art of interpretation, hermeneutics, is the discipline arising from reflection on the problems involved in the transmission of meaning from text or symbol to reader or hearer. This course will survey reflections on these problems from ancient times to our own. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 412 “Seas of Stories”: Postcolonial Literature and Theory

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore diverse “seas of stories” (as Salman Rushdie terms it) from various parts of the world. We will focus on key issues involved in postcolonial theory as well as the complexities, possibilities, and challenges of this particular theoretical approach to the study of literature and culture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 414 The Politics of Law

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will explore law as an aspect of the foundations of American and Western thought and as a significant source of debate in contemporary politics and culture. We will examine primary texts and secondary materials as we begin to study law as a source of ideas, culture, and institutions in American society. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 416 Sex, Self, Society

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course explores the ways in which macro and micro institutions structure gender and sexual relations in society and how gender and sexual practices in turn structures and stratifies the social order. It addresses our sexual socialization, gender identities and the social consequences of gender stratification. It seeks to promote greater literacy regarding our lives as sexual beings, as gendered beings, and as romantic beings. This course is best suited for mature upper division students. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 418 Critical Pedagogy: Teaching to Transgress

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. In this course, we will focus on different models of teachers for the purpose of challenging the oppressive structures of the social order so as to build a deeper and stronger democracy in which all peoples can participate and have a voice. We will also give credit to those institutions and values that need to be upheld and defended but we will not shirk from challenging institutions and social relations that are unfair or unjust. In other words, we seek to “speak truth to power.” The course is designed to challenge fundamental preconceptions of what a teacher should be or how a teaching should be conveyed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 419 The Search for an American Voice: Huck Finn to Harlem

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course will explore how writers and composers have mined the vernacular in pursuit of an American style distinct from European practice. It begins with Ralph Waldo Emerson’s call for a new American voice, distinct from the “courtly muses” of Europe, and traces the development of that voice through Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Charles Ives into the 20th century urban voices of the Harlem Renaissance and George Gershwin. Students will attend special performances and lectures in conjunction with the Pacific Symphony’s Ives and Gershwin festival. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 424 Magic, the Occult and Art in the Early Modern Period

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. In this course, students will explore the surprisingly central role that magic and the occult played in the early modern period (Middle Ages and the Renaissance). Students will become familiar with definitions of popular magic, as well as magie savante (alchemy, geomancy and necromancy) as well as with artistic manifestations, such as relics, art objects, gems and talismans. Astrology, the art of divination and talismans will be considered in the context of the dreams of the Renaissance magus so that students may also consider how mysticism, magic and science were intertwined in the Medieval and Renaissance period. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 432 Queer Theory

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of Honors Program, Director. Overview and in-depth study of selected issues in queer theory with emphasis on intersectionality, interdisciplinarity, and students’ individual critical or creative research projects. The course will engage with foundational texts in queer theory, as well as contemporary queer theory, including, for instance, work in queer animal studies, queer disability studies, transgender theory, asexuality, intersexuality, and queer postcoloniality. Central questions we will ask include the following: Is "queer" different from "GLBT"? How does "queer" intersect/collide with gender, class, and racial identifications? How has queer theory impacted a variety of academic disciplines? Why has queer theory become so fashionable? What is the relationship between queer theory and political activism? In our pursuit of these and other questions, we’ll work with texts from multiple genres and media (including films, music videos, internet memes, tweets, zines, literature, and critical theory) that articulate, enact, embody, defy, and complicate the sexy, exciting, challenging, and rapidly changing/expanding field of queer theory. Discussion-based seminar. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 440 Up

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. This course explores the concept of up and the fascination and exhilaration of all things unbounded by Earth. We will look at the why and the how of things that extend into and move in air, including images, ideas, and objects that point us upward, whether conceptually, physically, or spiritually. The course will consider the linguistic and metaphorical possibilities of up; the anatomy of birds in relation to flight and community; the history, physics, and future of human-powered flight on Earth and into space; the dynamic structures of clouds and weather; and other human-created objects that extend upward. The course includes a field trip that gets students up-close with flight. While this will be an interdisciplinary course drawing from history, literature, science, and theology, students would look at how these concepts have evolved and have been influenced and visualized creatively in art, design, and writing. The course will introduce various concepts involving the fascination and creative histories of flying and sky-bound narratives as well as laws of science. Students will use lectures as the entry point for a cultural, historical, artistic, and scientific introduction, then proceed to an experimental phase that concludes with a design, art, or creative writing project. UP will also incorporate guest speakers from among our faculty at Chapman University so that they can share ideas from various disciplines and talk about histories and inspirations about what up means in their subject area. This course is an opportunity for true interdisciplinary discussions among faculty and students. In addition, Southern California is the home, in many respects, of space exploration; the space shuttles and Mars rovers were built here, for instance. That local history and industry offers an amazing context for this course and ability to connect our academic efforts with the regional community. UP will foster exactly the kind of analytical thinker that Chapman University advocates through personalized education and an interdisciplinary perspective that asks students to think critically about their education from multiple vantage points. Because UP will provide a rigorous academic context for innovative and hands-on creative projects, the students will find that this course places them in especially good stead as they continue their education and vocational paths. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HON 498 Honors Capstone Seminar

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. Each senior Honors student is required to complete the Honors capstone. For this capstone, students will complete an interdisciplinary version of their departmental senior projects using the methodology (and, if possible, the content) of other relevant disciplines. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

HON 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, acceptance to the University Honors Program, or consent of instructor. The student initiates and conducts an in-depth study or research in a specific area in conjunction with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – First–Year Foundations

FFC 100 First–Year Foundations

Prerequisite, freshmen. This course engages students in interdisciplinary, university-level critical inquiry and reflection. The FFC course focuses more on critical engagement, exploration, and communication related to complex issues than on mastering a body of material. The section topics vary, and students select a topic according to their academic and personal interests. Must be taken for a letter grade. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FFC 100L First–Year Foundations Lab

Prerequisite, freshmen. A single-credit lab appended to selected FFC sections for co-curricular activities. Only specific sections of FFC 100 noted in the class schedule will require this lab as a corequisite to FFC 100. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

Course Descriptions – General University Studies

GUS 101 Cooking in the 21st Century

This hands-on course will provide the foundation of culinary techniques and instill the skills and confidence to prepare complete meals. Taught by expert chef-instructors, the course will introduce students to basics of knife work and sauce preparation and various techniques of cooking a range of products from appetizers to desserts. Classes held in Sodexo’s state-of-the-art kitchen in Sandhu Conference Center. Cut-resistant gloves provided; slip-resistant shoes required. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

Course Descriptions – Individualized Experiential Learning Project

IELP 201 Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, sophomore standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty and Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education. Students enrolled in IELP 201 will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that has clearly stated academic objectives and outcomes tied to community-based learning. Projects may be in conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IELP 201C Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, sophomore standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty, GE Committee, and Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education. Students enrolled in IELP 201 CC will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that meets the academic purposes of the Citizenship, Community, and Service portion of the 2007 GE program. Projects may be conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IELP 201G Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, sophomore standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty, Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education, and GE Committee. Students enrolled in IELP 201 GC will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that meets the academic purposes of the Global Study portion of the 2007 GE program. Projects may be conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IELP 401 Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, junior standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty and Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education. Students enrolled in IELP 401 will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that has clearly stated academic objectives and outcomes tied to community-based learning at an advanced level. Projects may be conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IELP 401C Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, junior standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty, Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education, and GE Committee. Students enrolled in IELP 401 CC will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that meets the academic purposes of the Citizenship, Community, and Service portion of the 2007 GE program at an advanced level. Projects may be conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IELP 401G Individualized Experiential Learning Project

Prerequisites, junior standing or above, consent of sponsoring faculty, Vice Chancellor for Undergraduate Education, and GE Committee. Students enrolled in IELP 401 CG will pursue an individually designed experiential learning project that meets the academic purposes of the Global Study portion of the 2007 GE program at an advanced level. Projects may be conducted with organizations or individually. While the experiential learning project must be faculty-sponsored, the student assumes primary responsibility for designing, documenting, and completing the project. Credit equivalents: 40 hours = 1 credit; 60 hours = 1.5 credits; 80 hours = 2 credits; 100 hours = 2.5 credits; 120 hours = 3 credits. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Internship Temporary Subject Code

INTP 290 Independent Internship

This course serves as a place holder for the 290 level internship to be used for on-time financial aid eligibility. This course only serves as a place holder while the student works to secure an internship site and formally register for the internship course through the online internship portal. Students enrolled in INTP are required to enroll in an internship course by the 5th week of the semester. The internship course replaces the INTP on the student’s schedule. Any INTP courses not replaced by a formal academic internship by the end of the 5th week will be withdrawn. INTP credits are subject to regular tuition and fees and follow the regular add/drop or withdrawal tuition refund policy. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.

INTP 490 Independent Internship

This course serves as a place holder for the 490 level internship to be used for on-time financial aid eligibility. This course only serves as a place holder while the student works to secure an internship site and formally register for the internship course through the online internship registration portal. Students enrolled in INTP are required to enroll in an internship course by the 5th week of the semester. The internship course replaces the INTP on the student’s schedule. Any INTP courses not replaced by a formal academic internship by the end of the 5th week will be withdrawn. INTP credits are subject to regular tuition and fees and follow the regular add/drop or withdrawal tuition refund policy. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Physical Activity

PA 101 Volleyball

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 104 Bowling

Fee: $80. (Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 105 Ultimate Frisbee

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 106 Outdoor Soccer

(Offered spring semester.) ½ credit.

PA 107 Aerobics

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 108 Tennis

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 109 Martial Arts (Aikido)

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 110 Self Defense for Women

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 111 Yogalates

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 113 Personalized Fitness

Course offers an introduction to personal wellness and meets for once a week lecture on topics ranging from exercise, diet, nutrition, flexibility, injuries and stress. Students will then develop and execute their own exercise plan outside of class time and check-in on their progress throughout the semester. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

PA 114 Weight Training

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 120 Swimming Activities

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 121 Sailing

Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) ½ credit.

PA 122 Golf

Beginning Golf for business and life will familiarize students to the multifaceted sport of golf. This introductory course is open to all, including those with little or no prior knowledge and experience. Various topics throughout the semester will be presented to enhance student’s awareness of swing fundamentals as well as course protocol. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $25. (Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 126 Slow-Pitch Softball

This course is designed to introduce students to the recreational and competitive slow-pitch softball and teach basic physical fitness concepts. Students will learn the basic rules, strategies, and techniques in slow-pitch softball for league and tournament play, including fundamental skills of batting, infield, outfield, and base running. (Offered fall semester.) ½ credit.

PA 127 Lacrosse

Offered to help students become more familiar with the game of lacrosse and stick skills that are needed to play the game. This class will consist of aerobic conditioning and stick skill development. This class may be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester.) ½ credit.

PA 128 Basketball

(Offered every semester.) ½ credit.

PA 129 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

PA 163 Lifeguard Training

Corequisite, PA 164. The course includes instruction, and potential certification, in lifeguarding. Students must be able to swim 500 yards and retrieve a 10-pound brick from 7 feet of water. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 164 First Aid and CPR

Successful completion enables students to receive certification cards for both First Aid and CPR from the American Red Cross. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

Course Descriptions – Athletic Teams

PA 140 Football

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 141 Men’s Soccer Team

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 142 Men’s Basketball Team

(Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

PA 143 Cross Country Team Men/Women

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 144 Water Polo Team

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 145 Baseball Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 146 Golf Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 147 Lacrosse Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 148 Men’s Tennis Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 151 Women’s Volleyball Team

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 152 Women’s Softball Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 153 Women’s Basketball Team

(Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

PA 154 Women’s Soccer Team

(Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 155 Women’s Tennis Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 156 Swimming and Diving Team Men/Women

Students participating on the intercollegiate Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving Team meet for scheduled practices and intercollegiate competition. May be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PA 157 Track Team Men/Women

Students participating on the Intercollegiate Men's and Women's Track Team meet for scheduled practices and intercollegiate competition. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 158 Crew (Rowing) Men and Women

Students participating on the Men's and Women's Club Crew Team meet for scheduled practices and competition throughout the spring semester. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 159 Women’s Water Polo Team

(Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PA 160 Women's Lacrosse Team

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students participating on the intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse team meet for scheduled practices and intercollegiate competition throughout the spring semester. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.