Department of World Languages and Cultures

John Boitano, Ph.D., Chair

Professor: Tschacher;

Associate Professors: Boitano, Hodge, Loustau, Pacchioni, Valenzuela;

Assistant Professors: Gallagher, MacVicar, Olivier, Paduano, Wood;

Instructor: Fuentes, Goodman, Hill, Sweet, Valle.

Bachelor of Arts in French

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers the study of modern and classical languages such as Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin and Spanish. The program is designed to increase students' linguistic and practical skills and broaden their awareness of the culture they are studying. All courses in the major or minor must be taken for a letter grade.

Semester Abroad Program with The American Institute For Foreign Studies (AIFS) in Cannes, France

AIFS–Cannes, France, offers a vast array of beginning, intermediate and advanced French language courses as well as general education courses taught in French and/or English in art history, organizational leadership, history/sociology and French cinema. Chapman University oversees AIFS–Cannes and is responsible for the transcription of all grades. A unique internship program at the International Cannes Film Festival is offered each spring. Students may study with AIFS–Cannes during the fall, spring and summer sessions. The department regularly offers an internship travel seminar to France. Course descriptions may be found under the Chapman Courses Abroad section of the catalog. Contact the Center for Global Education for more details at (714) 997–6829.

Bachelor of Arts in French

requirements (30 credits, 24 of which must be upper–division)

nine of the following (27 credits)

FREN 201

Intermediate French I

3

FREN 201B

Intermediate French I for Business Professionals

3

FREN 201C

Intermediate French I for Film and TV Professionals

3

FREN 202

Intermediate French II

3

FREN 340

Cuisine in French Literature and Film

3

FREN 341

Literary and Cinematographic Images of the French Past: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry

3

FREN 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

FREN 345

Advanced French Conversation and Composition I

3

FREN 346

Advanced French Conversation and Composition II

3

FREN 347

Business French

3

FREN 348

Francophone Literatures of the World

3

FREN 349

French Theater Across the Ages

3

FREN 350

French Poetry Across the Ages

3

FREN 351

French Writers of the Holocaust

3

FREN 352

French Writers of the Nouveau Roman (New Novel)

3

FREN 353

Topics in Historical Tours: Paris, A Literary History

3

FREN 353C

Topics in Historical Tours: A Tale of Two Cities

3

FREN 354

French Opera in the Time of the Sun King: The "Libretti" of Quinault and Music of Lully

3

FREN 355

Memories of World War II in French Films

3

FREN 356

Topics in French Opera

3

FREN 360

Performance in French

3

FREN 375

French Literature

3

FREN 378

French Civilization

3

FREN 386

Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages

3

FREN 387

Remakes and Adaptations in Films: From France to Hollywood

3

FREN 389

The French Philosophers and the French Enlightenment

3

FREN 399

Individual Study

3

FREN 499

Individual Study

3

requirement (3 credits)

FREN 496

Integrated Junior/Senior Seminar

3

total credits

 

30

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.A. in French.

Students are encouraged to spend at least one semester in France or a Francophone country.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

core requirements (21 credits)

seven of the following

SPAN 202

Intermediate Spanish II

3

SPAN 326

Reading and Interpreting Literature

3

SPAN 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

SPAN 344

Spanish Writing Workshop

3

SPAN 375

Literature and Culture of Spain I

3

SPAN 376

Literature and Culture of Spain II

3

SPAN 377

Literature and Culture of Latin America I

3

SPAN 378

Literature and Culture of Latin America II

3

linguistics requirements (6 credits)

SPAN 396

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

3

one of the following

SPAN 440

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism

3

SPAN 441

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

3

upperdivision electives (6 credits)

two of the following

SPAN 397

United States Latino Literatures and Cultures

3

SPAN 398

20th Century Latin American Fiction: Journeys Across Memory

 

3

SPAN 440

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism

3

SPAN 441

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

3

SPAN 470

Techno Writing and Global Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Culture

3

SPAN 484

20th Century Spanish Poetry and Drama: Literary Pictures

3

SPAN 485

Hispanic Theatre in Dialogue with the Classics: A Workshop for Dramatic Creations

3

SPAN 499

Individual Study

3

total credits

 

33

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.A. in Spanish.

Students are encouraged to spend at least one semester in a Spanish–speaking country.

Minors in the Department of World Languages and Cultures

Minor in French

requirements (21 credits, 15 of which must be upper–division)

seven of the following

FREN 201

Intermediate French I

3

FREN 201B

Intermediate French I for Business Professionals

3

FREN 201C

Intermediate French I for Film and TV Professionals

3

FREN 202

Intermediate French II

3

FREN 340

Cuisine in French Literature and Film

3

FREN 341

Literary and Cinematographic Images of the French Past: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry

3

FREN 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

FREN 345

Advanced French Conversation and Composition I

3

FREN 346

Advanced French Conversation and Composition II

3

FREN 347

Business French

3

FREN 348

Francophone Literatures of the World

3

FREN 349

French Theater Across the Ages

3

FREN 350

French Poetry Across the Ages

3

FREN 351

French Writers of the Holocaust

3

FREN 352

French Writers of the Nouveau Roman (New Novel)

3

FREN 353

Topics in Historical Tours: Paris, A Literary History

3

FREN 353C

Topics in Historical Tours: A Tale of Two Cities

3

FREN 354

French Opera in the Time of the Sun King: The "Libretti" of Quinault and Music of Lully

3

FREN 355

Memories of World War II in French Films

3

FREN 356

Topics in French Opera

3

FREN 360

Performance in French

3

FREN 375

French Literature

3

FREN 378

French Civilization

3

FREN 386

Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages

3

FREN 387

Remakes and Adaptations in Film: From France to Hollywood

3

FREN 389

The French Philosophers and the French Enlightenment

3

FREN 399

Individual Study

3

FREN 499

Individual Study

3

total credits

 

21

Students are encouraged to spend at least one semester in France or a Francophone country.

Minor in German Studies

core requirements (18 credits, 15 of which must be upper–division)

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits from section one and six additional credits from either section one or two or equivalent courses taken abroad.

section one

GER 201

Intermediate German I

3

GER 326

Reading and Interpreting Literature

3

GER 341

German Film

3

GER 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

GER 345

German Conversation

3

GER 347

Business German

3

GER 351

The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

3

GER 360

Performance in German/Theater

3

GER 375

German Literature

3

GER 378

German Culture and Civilization

3

GER 399

Individual Study

1–3

GER 499

Individual Study

1–3

section two

HIST 112

Western Civilization: From the Reformation to Modern Times

3

MUS 302

Music History and Literature II

3

MUS 303

Music History and Literature III

3

REL 307

Germany and the Holocaust

3

HIST 310

Modern Europe

3

REL 318

The Reformation

3

HUM 351

The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

3

HIST 365

Topics in the Holocaust

3

ENG 449

Literature in Translation (20th Century German Literature in Translation)

3

total credits

 

18

Students are encouraged to spend at least one semester in a German–speaking country.

Minor in Italian Studies

requirements (21 credits, at least 15 of which must be upper–division).

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits from section one and three credits from section two. The remaining six credits can be taken from section two or three. Courses taken abroad may qualify for approval.

section one

ITAL 201

Intermediate Italian I

3

ITAL 202

Intermediate Italian II

3

ITAL 291

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

ITAL 301

Conversation and Composition: Regional Culture and Tradition

3

ITAL 341a

Italian Cinema: Great Film Directors

3

ITAL 345

Conversation and Composition: Introduction to Contemporary Italy

3

ITAL 352

The Fantastic in Italian Literature

3

ITAL 375

Masterpieces of Italian Literature

3

ITAL 399

Individual Study

1–3

ITAL 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

ITAL 499

Individual Study

1–3

section two

ITAL 341

Italian Cinema: Politics, Art and Industry

3

ITAL 348

The Italian American Experience in Literature and Film

3

HON 371

The World of Fellini's Cinema

3

HON 373

The Puppet Metaphor Across Media

3

section three

MUS 301

Music History and Literature I

3

HIST 306

The Middle Ages

3

HIST 308

Early Modern Europe

3

HON 321

The New Mathematics of the Italian Renaissance

3

ART 354

Art, Politics and Murder: 15th and 16th Century Florence and the Medici

3

ART 355

Art and the Senses: Visual Culture of the Most Serene Republic of Venice in the 15th and 16th Century

3

ART 356

Princely Art: Renaissance Court Art and Culture of Mantua, Milan, Ferrara and Rome

3

ART 357

Rethinking Renaissance Visual Culture: 15th and 16th Century Florence, Rome and Venice

3

HIST 358

Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler

3

ART 379

Rome: The Development of the City (Travel Course)

3

ART 386

Monarchy, Republic, Empire: Etruscan and Roman Art

3

IES 444

Aesthetics and Learning: Florence, Italy [consent of instructor] (Travel Course)

3

ENG 449

Literature in Translation (Italian topics only, as special substitution)

3

total credits

 

21

Student are encouraged to spend at least one semester in Italy.

Minor in Japanese Studies

requirements (21 credits, at least 15 of which must be upper–division).

Students must complete 15 credits from section one and six additional credits from section two or approved Japanese language/Japan related course work in a study abroad program in Japan.

section one

JPN 202

Intermediate Japanese II

3

JPN 301

Intensive Course for Chinese Characters

3

JPN 343

Advanced Japanese Grammar and Composition

3

JPN 345

Advanced Japanese Conversation

3

JPN 347

Business Japanese

3

JPN 478

Japanese History and Civilization

3

JPN 499

Individual Study

½–6

section two

HIST 262

History of the Samurai

3

HIST 263

Modern Japan

3

ART 265

Exchange and Evolution in the Arts of China and Japan

3

REL 336

Buddhism

3

HIST 354

From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan

 

ENG 449

Literature in Translation (Japanese)

3

total credits

 

21

Students are encouraged to spend at least one semester in Japan.

Minor in Spanish

requirements (21 credits, 15 of which must be upper–division)

requirement (3 credits)

SPAN 326

Reading and Interpreting Literature

3

six of the following (18 credits)

SPAN 202

Intermediate Spanish II

3

SPAN 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

SPAN 344

Spanish Writing Workshop

3

SPAN 345

Spanish Conversation

3

SPAN 375

Literature and Culture of Spain I

3

SPAN 376

Literature and Culture of Spain II

3

SPAN 377

Literature and Culture of Latin America I

3

SPAN 378

Literature and Culture of Latin America II

3

SPAN 396

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

3

SPAN 397

United States Latino Literatures and Cultures

3

SPAN 398

20th Century Latin American Fiction: Journeys Across Memory

3

SPAN 440

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism

3

SPAN 441

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

3

SPAN 470

Techno Writing and Global Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Culture

 

SPAN 484

20th Century Spanish Poetry and Drama: Literary Pictures

3

SPAN 485

Hispanic Theatre in Dialogue with the Classics: A Workshop for Dramatic Creations

3

total credits

 

21

Course Descriptions – American Sign Language

ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I

This course is an introduction the fundamentals of American Sign Language. The course will prepare students to work within a visual environment and initiate basic visual/gestural communication in ASL. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ASL 102 Elementary American Sign Language II

Prerequisite, ASL 101. This course is an introduction the fundamentals of American Sign Language. The course will prepare students to work within a visual environment and initiate basic visual/gestural communication in ASL. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I

Prerequisite, ASL 102. American Sign Language 201 is the third course is the ASL segment. This intermediate level ASL class allows students to transition from comprehension to actual production of ASL. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Arabic

ARAB 101 Elementary Arabic I

Students develop beginning level skills in reading, writing, and speaking Arabic. Students will study basic grammar and vocabulary and will have listening and speaking practice. Students will strengthen reading and writing skills through different mechanisms including popular media and literary selections while also noting customs and cultures of the Arabic-speaking world. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ARAB 102 Elementary Arabic II

Prerequisite, ARAB 101. Students develop beginning level skills in reading, writing, and speaking Arabic. Students will study basic grammar and vocabulary and will have listening and speaking practice. Students will strengthen reading and writing skills through different mechanisms including popular media and literary selections while also noting customs and cultures of the Arabic-speaking world. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ARAB 201, 202 Intermediate Arabic I, II

Prerequisite, for ARAB 201, completion of ARAB 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. For ARAB 202, completion of ARAB 201, or consent of instructor. Conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, cultural, and literary readings. (Offered every year.) 3, 3 credits.

ARAB 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ARAB 399 Individual Study

Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Chinese

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I

Mastery of basic vocabulary and structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of Chinese geography and customs. Five contact hours per week. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II

Prerequisite, CHIN 101. Mastery of basic vocabulary and structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of Chinese geography and customs. Five contact hours per week. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CHIN 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHIN 201, 202 Intermediate Chinese I, II

Prerequisite, for CHIN 201, CHIN 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. For CHIN 202, CHIN 201, or consent of instructor. Conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, cultural, and literary readings. (Offered every year.) 3, 3 credits.

CHIN 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, CHIN 201, or consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHIN 301 Chinese Culture and Society

Prerequisite, CHIN 202, or consent of instructor. The content of third year Chinese is to serve as a bridge to authentic materials in newspapers. The focus is on increasing knowledge of grammar and building reading skills. To supplement the textbook, edited authentic materials such simple news broadcast and excerpts of talk shows may be included depending on student interest. Course content is common topics about China and Taiwan today dealing with culture, society, and current issues such as the role of men and women, politics, and economics in modern China. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CHIN 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, CHIN 201, or consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHIN 490 Chinese Independent Internship

Prerequisites, completion of two 300-level courses in CHIN, consent of instructor. Independent Internship is a practical course that provides students with professional opportunities to explore and learn about their chosen careers. An important goal is to introduce students to the type of language used for specific purposes and to familiarize them to the culture of the workplace. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

CHIN 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Foreign Language

Language course work taken through study abroad or in transfer may be designated as subject FL if the language is not offered at Chapman. 

FL 101 Foreign Language 1st Semester

3 credits.

FL 102 Foreign Language 2nd Semester

3 credits.

FL 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

FL 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

FL 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – French

FREN 101 Elementary French I

Students gain mastery of a basic vocabulary, structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of French geography, and social customs. Two hours of lab per week are required. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FREN 102 Elementary French II

Prerequisite, FREN 101. Students gain mastery of a basic vocabulary, structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of French geography, and social customs. Two hours of lab per week are required. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FREN 104 Intensive Elementary French

Prerequisite, two or more years of high school French with a gap of two or more years in the study of the language, or FREN 101, or consent of instructor. Mastery of a basic vocabulary and structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of French geography, and customs. One hour per week of lab required. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

FREN 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

FREN 201 Intermediate French I

Prerequisite, FREN 102. The course covers conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, and cultural and literary readings. Two hours per week of lab are required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FREN 201B Intermediate French I for Business Professionals

Prerequisite, FREN 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, cultural and readings for business professionals. Two hours per week of virtual lab required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 201C Intermediate French I for Film and TV Professionals

Prerequisite, FREN 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, cultural and readings for Film and TV professionals. Two hours per week of virtual lab required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II

Prerequisite, FREN 201. The course covers conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, and cultural and literary readings. Two hours per week of lab are required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FREN 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

FREN 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

FREN 340 Cuisine in French Literature and Film

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course is a thematic survey of some selected French literary texts and films about the topic of food, eating, and cuisine. Emphasis will be placed on reading and critical analysis of primary and secondary texts and films in French and English. Students will write in French. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 341 Literary and Cinematographic Images of the French Past: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary approach to the study of French cinema, history, civilization, culture, and literature. This seminar explores the manner in which these two popular art forms influence the very nature of French cultural identity. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 343 Advanced Grammar and Composition

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. Detailed review of grammar and exercises in various styles of writing. Content varies each time offered. May be repeated for credit. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 345 Advanced French Conversation and Composition I

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. Exercises in conversational French and composition. Discussions may be based on current activities and periodicals. Presentation of films. Content varies each time offered. May be repeated for credit if a different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 346 Advanced French Conversation and Composition II

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor. Exercises in conversational French and composition. Discussions may be based on current activities and periodicals. Presentation of films. Content varies each time offered. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 347 Business French

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course presents specialized vocabulary dealing with all aspects of business. Students learn the use of forms, letters and other documents, and practice preparing correspondence of various types. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 348 Francophone Literatures of the World

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course will explore the rich Francophone literatures of the world from the poetry of the former President of Sénégal, Léopold (Sédar) Senghor, to the famous novels of the Moroccan novelist, Tahar Ben Jelloun and Guadeloupean novelist Maryse Condé. Content varies each time offered focusing on either Francophone literature of Africa or the Americans and the Caribbean. May be repeated for credit. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 349 French Theater Across the Ages

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course will examine famous French theatrical texts from Molière's Tartuffe to Ionesco's Cantatrice Chauve. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 350 French Poetry Across the Ages

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course will examine the work of famous French poets such as Marie de France, Marot, Ronsard, Labbé, Chénier, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Hugo, Apollinaire, Élouard, Valéry, Prévert, and Ponge. This course will explore the various poetic movements and schools, versification, and poetic discourse. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 351 French Writers of the Holocaust

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course will examine the question of the narration of the “unspeakable” and the importance of written testimony. Students will read and analyze writers who chose the French language to tell their story or the story of loved ones such as Élie Wiesel, Marguerite Duras, Jorge Semprun, and Jean-Claude Girardin. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 352 French Writers of the Nouveau Roman (New Novel)

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. The course will examine the novels of famous French writers such as Alain Robbe-Grillet, Marguerite Duras, Nathalie Sarraute, Georges Perec, Michel Butor, JMG Le Clézio, and others. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 353 Topics in Historical Tours: Paris, A Literary History

(Same as HIST 346H.) Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course will be taught on location in Paris during the interterm or summer. If offered during the interterm, several lectures will be first conducted on the Orange campus before the Paris segment of the class. Students will explore the rich history of literature of France, with specific emphasis on the city of Paris, through immersion in the historic places and sites of the proverbial city of lights. May be repeated for credit if the tour sites, experiences and assignments are different than those in which students previously received credit. Fee: TBA. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 353B Topics in Historical Tours: A Literary History of the French Riviera and Provence

(Same as HUM 353B.) Prerequisite, FREN 201. A segment, or the entire course, will be taught on location in the South of France. Both the French Riviera and Provence have inspired writers and artists from Fitzgerald, Pagnol and Daudet to Cezane, Cbagall and Picasso. Students will explore the region's rich history and literature. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 353C Topics in Historical Tours: A Tale of Two Cities

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. Students will spend ten days in both London and Paris during the interterm period. The center of this course is a self-chosen and self-designed research project that looks at some aspect of the life in and history of London and Paris. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

FREN 354 French Opera in the Time of the Sun King: The "Libretti" of Quinault and Music of Lully

(Same as MUS 354.) Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. An exploration of both the literary and the musical traditions of the finest operas written in French during the reign of Louis XIV. Students will read libretti written in French from the classical era such as Quinault’s Alceste and Corneille’s Psyché. Students will examine the rich literary tradition of the libretti and their fascinating interplay with the music of composers such as Lully. The class will provide students with an understanding of the historical setting in which the most popular performing art emerged as a powerful instrument of royalist propaganda during the reign of the Sun King. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 355 Memories of World War II in French Films

Prerequisite, FREN 201. Students will examine the debates and changing attitudes towards the war through the prism of film. The class will explore films produced in the last sixty years and we will consider the ways in which these representations helped shape the image the French had of themselves. Films to be screened include works by Clément, Melville, Renais, and Malle. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 356 Topics in French Opera

(Same as MUS 356.) Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor for FREN 356. MUS 102, or consent of instructor for MUS 356. An exploration of both the literary and the musical traditions of the finest operas written in French and their relationship to other literary genres and performing arts. May be repeated for credit if a different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 360 Performance in French

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for students who are interested in performance in a foreign language. Emphasis will be placed on acting as well as on the improvement of foreign language skills. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 370 Writing About Food: French Composition

Prerequisite, FREN 201. This course is designed to improve students writing skills in French through the topic of food. Students will learn how to write on numerous styles of French: manifesto, description, opinion, critic of a text or a film, and improve their grammar and vocabulary through the topic of food as a cultural, historical, sociological, poetical subject. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FREN 375 French Literature

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. Students read and analyze selected works from representative authors in the novel, drama, and poetry. Content varies each time offered. May be repeated for credit. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 378 French Civilization

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. The study of the geography, political history, cultural development of France, its position in the modern world, and its role overseas. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 386 Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring how French women writers (and directors), from the Middle Ages to our XXI century, expressed leadership across their artistic talent. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 387 Remakes and Adaptations in Films: From France to Hollywood

Prerequisite, FREN 201. This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring the meaning and implication of the remake in films, particularly what happens to the French film when is becomes an American product. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

FREN 389 The French Philosophers and the French Enlightenment

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. This literature course will focus on the major French philosophers novels, plays and political writings leading to the French Revolution. Readings by Diderot, Rousseau, Marivaux, Volataire, Montesquieu. The role of women of letters will be explored as well through the readings of Mme de Stael and Mme Riccoboni. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, FREN 201, or consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them with in-depth study of a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

FREN 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

FREN 496 Integrated Junior/Senior Seminar

Prerequisites, FREN 201, or consent of instructor, and French major, or minor. Senior capstone course for French majors, and minors. In this course, students complete research for and write their senior thesis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FREN 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them in-depth study in a specific area. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – German

GER 101 Elementary German I

Students develop beginning communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Appreciation for the Swiss, German, and Austrian cultures is developed. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

GER 102 Elementary German II

Prerequisite, GER 101. Students develop beginning communicative competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Appreciation for the Swiss, German, and Austrian cultures is developed. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

GER 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 6 credits.

GER 201 Intermediate German I

Prerequisite, GER 102. Students work on reviewing, expanding, and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations, particularly those relevant to the majors of the students in the class. Intensified reading and writing will be used to explore the diverse geography and culture of the German–speaking countries. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

GER 202 Intermediate German II

Prerequisite, GER 201. Students work on reviewing, expanding, and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations, particularly those relevant to the majors of the students in the class. Intensified reading and writing will be used to explore the diverse geography and culture of the German–speaking countries. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

GER 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

GER 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

GER 326 Reading and Interpreting Literature

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. Students develop reading and writing skills with the aim of attaining literacy in German. Strategies and techniques for interpreting literary works in light of cultural context are emphasized. Recommended before taking GER 375 German Literature. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

GER 341 German Film

Prerequisite, GER 201. Film is a powerful art form and means of communication. This interdisciplinary course will explore the historical background of the German–speaking cultures through literary and cinematographic images, which are often catalysts for cultural change. This course can be repeated once if different films are examined. May be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 343 Advanced Grammar and Composition

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. This is a rigorous writing course designed to allow the student to perfect German composition skills in various writing styles through drafts, revisions, and final projects. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 345 German Conversation

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. Students will perform fluency–building exercises in conversational German. Discussions will be based upon current events using periodicals and videos. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 347 Business German

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. This course presents a specialized vocabulary dealing with all aspects of business and are given insight into the role Germany, Austria, and Switzerland play in the global economy. Students learn the use of forms, letters, and other documents, and they practice preparing correspondence of various types. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 351 The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

(Same as HUM 351.) Prerequisite, GER 201. This course will examine various aspects of the Holocaust in literary texts. We will examine the lives of those confined inside the concentration camps, those rescued, those whose lives were destroyed or shattered and those who showed courage. Students will be challenged to evaluate their personal values and develop their own ethical responsibility in the face of ongoing genocides. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

GER 360 Performance in German/Theater

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for students who are interested in performing a play in a foreign language (German). Emphasis will be placed on acting as well as on the improvement of foreign language skills. Although a number of different dramas/plays by major German playwrights will be analyzed, the course will focus on one play which students will prepare to enact for the larger Chapman University and community audience. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 375 German Literature

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. Students read and analyze selected works from representative authors in the novel, drama, and poetry. Content varies each time offered. May be repeated for credit. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 378 German Culture and Civilization

Prerequisite, GER 201, or consent of instructor. The study of the geography, political history, and cultural development of German–speaking countries, their position in the European Union, and their role in the modern world. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

GER 399 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

GER 490 Independent Internship

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

GER 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, GER 201. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

GER 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Greek

GRK 101 Elementary Classical Greek I

Mastery of alphabet, vocabulary, grammar, and correct pronunciation, along with an introduction to classical Greece. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

GRK 102 Elementary Classical Greek II

Prerequisite, GRK 101. Mastery of alphabet, vocabulary, grammar, and correct pronunciation, along with an introduction to classical Greece. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

GRK 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, GRK 102, or consent of instructor. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

GRK 499 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Italian

ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I

This course is an introduction to Italian by oral–aural practice, including simple conversation and reading of texts concerning Italian life and culture, with an emphasis on those aspects useful for music students. Two hours of lab per week are required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II

Prerequisite, ITAL 101. This course is an introduction to Italian by oral–aural practice, including simple conversation and reading of texts concerning Italian life and culture, with an emphasis on those aspects useful for music students. Two hours of lab per week are required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ITAL 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I

Prerequisite, ITAL 102. Students expand and improve communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. The course also covers conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, and cultural and literary readings. Two hours of labs per week are required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II

Prerequisite, ITAL 201. Students expand and improve communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. The course also covers conversation, concepts of grammar in review, composition, and cultural and literary readings. Two hours of labs per week are required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ITAL 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ITAL 301 Conversation and Composition: Italian Regional Culture and Tradition

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of the instructor. Students will practice conversational Italian and continue to build their skills in writing, reading, and listening. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency, the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout. Students will read historical, literary and journalistic excerpts, and engage in a number of creative and critical activities focusing on specific regions and cities of Italy. In order to explore the various manifestations of Italian regional life, the coursework will entail the experience and examination of the peninsula’s visual and musical culture, landscapes and cityscapes, folk arts and craft, and food culture. The various components of the course will flow into a semester-long creative writing assignment for which each student will research and compose a short life story of a fictional Italian character living in a specific area of Italy. The class will be conducted in Italian and paced to build linguistic competence. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 341 Italian Cinema: Politics, Art, and Industry

(Same as FS 443f.) This course is a survey of the history of Italian cinema. We will study how cinema has embodied Italian collective consciousness and identity and how it has evolved artistically at different moments during the 20th century. Particular attention will be given to Italian cinema's relationship with other national cinemas and Hollywood. We will read about and screen some of the most representational and influential films by directors such as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, Leone, Bertolucci and others. Among the topics discussed are: the birth of Italian cinema, silent cinema, cinema during Fascism, the aesthetic and ethical heritage of Neorealism, auteur cinema, collaboration practices, existential and abstract cinema, comedy Italian style, the advent of TV and the new genres of the 60s and 70s, and recent trends. Taught in English. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 341a Italian Cinema: Great Film Directors

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of instructor. This is an advanced course in Italian composition and conversation built around the study of history of Italian Cinema. Students will analyze the nuances and significance of films by directors such as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Pasolini, Antonioni, Bertolucci and Leone, and investigate the way in which they reflect their specific cultural and historical contexts. The study of Italian language and film culture will be integrated throughout (including different types of scholarly, historical, literary, and journalistic excerpts). The class will be conducted in Italian and paced to build linguistic competence. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 342 Advanced Italian Grammar and Stylistics

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of instructor. Through inductive analysis, language play, textual interpretation, and writing activities, students will undertake an in-depth study of the subtle aspects of the Italian language. Students will read and study different types of texts including: the descriptive, the narrative, the lyrical, the essay, and the epistolary. Among the linguistic elements addressed by the class are: advanced grammar structures, lexical interferences between English and Italian, common rhetorical tropes, Italian idiomatic expressions, and patterns of linguistic variations across time and space. In addition to improving linguistic awareness and refining communication skills in Italian, the course aims to develop aesthetic appreciation and affective use of the language. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 345 Conversation and Composition: Introduction to Contemporary Italy

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of instructor. Students will practice conversational Italian and continue to build their skills in writing, reading, and listening. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout (including different types of historical, literary and journalistic excerpts). Students will investigate topics such as national identity, terrorism, economy, family, immigration, emigration, criminality, politics and otherness as reflected in number of contemporary films and documentaries. The class will be conducted in Italian and paced to build linguistic competence. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 348 The Italian American Experience in Literature and Film

This course offers students the historical and cultural background needed to better understand the genesis of Italian-American stereotypes in Hollywood throughout the 20th century as well as the attempts to dislodge stereotypes of Italian-American class, rage, and gender. At the center of this course is the objective of understanding the manifestation of Italian-American perspective across various forms of cultural production and within their specific historical context. The course readings provide a background for the critical discourse on Italian American ethnicity and representation, and include a number of literary texts. Students will undertake original research projects integrating work with the Italian community in Orange County and special archival sources at Chapman University's Leatherby Library. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 352 The Fantastic in Italian Literature

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of the instructor. This course explores the nature and evolution of Italian fantastic literature as it developed as a genre during the 20th century. While focusing on texts written by some of the most prominent modern writers in Italy, class lectures will also introduce to more ancient patterns of fantasy contained in classic heroic poetry as well as traditional fables. Students will also screen a few films to further understand themes and issues intrinsic in Italian speculative narrative. While developing their understanding of the Italian fantastic literary culture, students will continue the study of advanced structures and stylistics through various activities involving writing, listening, and speaking. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 353 The Short Narrative in Italian Culture: Oral Tradition, Literature, and Cinema

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of instructor. This course examines the phenomenon of the short narrative in the Italian oral tradition, literature, and cinema. Storytelling has been a staple of Italian culture since the dawn of time, leading to a rich body of regional folk stories, works such as Boccaccio's Decameron, extraordinary collections of novellas, short stories, and short films in modern and contemporary times. In addition to introducing students to the style and cultural context of a number of modern narrators, the texts – characterized by suddenness, brevity, and rhythm – serve as the basis for critical analysis, and oral and written practice in the language. To encourage linguistic creativity, students will also be invited to produce their own short stories. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 375 Masterpieces of Italian Literature

Prerequisite, ITAL 201, or consent of instructor. This course focuses on a number of authors who have embodied and shaped the literature and culture of Italy, from the Middle Ages until modern times. Students will analyze significant works by authors such as Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Castiglione, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Manzoni, Leopardi, Verga, Pirandello, Ungaretti, Calvino, and Eco. The readings will serve as a starting point for conversation and a basis for analyzing the authors’ style and the historical context of their works. A central objective of the course is to enrich the study of literature and to improve the students’ ability to express themselves with accuracy and ease both in speaking and in writing. Therefore, the study of the texts will be carried out through oral and written exercises and activities. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ITAL 399 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ITAL 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ITAL 499 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Japanese

JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I

Mastery of elementary level of Japanese Grammar, sentence structure and vocabulary, an overview of Japanese culture and customs. The class emphasizes communicative activities such as role-plays and interviews. 10 hours per semester of lab required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 102 Elementary Japanese II

Prerequisite, JPN 101. Mastery of elementary level of Japanese Grammar, sentence structure and vocabulary, an overview of Japanese culture and customs. The class emphasizes communicative activities such as role-plays and interviews. 10 hours per semester of lab required. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I

Prerequisite, JPN 102, or consent of instructor. Mastery of intermediate level of Japanese grammar, sentence structure and vocabulary. This course also provides students with ample practices for intermediate level of conversational skills. Students will develop skills to apply learned vocabulary and phrases in similar occasions in real life. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II

Prerequisite, JPN 201, or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. More detailed review of intermediate level of Japanese grammar, sentence structures, and vocabulary. This course also provides students with ample practices for intermediate level of conversation. This class should be taken prior to Advanced Japanese Grammar (JPN 343) class or Business Japanese class. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

JPN 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

JPN 301 Intensive Course for Chinese Characters

Prerequisite, JPN 102. Kanji (Chinese Characters) signify meaning. This class helps students learn the meaning of each parts of Kanji (radicals) and rules to make learning Kanji easier and fun. Students will also practice writing Kanji by using a traditional brush and ink (calligraphy) in order to master stroke orders of individual Kanji. Mastery of 250 Kanji used in daily lives in Japan making Kanji cards and playing word games. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

JPN 343 Advanced Japanese Grammar and Composition

Prerequisite, JPN 202, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor. Detail study of advance grammar and sentence structures. While the class aims at improving all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, the main focus will be placed on learning more advanced applications of different forms of Japanese verbs, grammatical structures, and vocabulary. In this class students will also practice reading and writing various styles of writing. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 345 Advanced Japanese Conversation

Prerequisite, JPN 343, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor. Students perform exercises in conversational Japanese through activities such as situational role-plays, discussions, and debates in Japanese based on current news and oral presentations. Several DVD's and movies on Japanese society and culture are presented for discussion and debates. As a Final Project, students are required to make their own situational skits (at least three different situations) or they can choose to act out all the dialogs presented in the textbook. All the dialogue must be filmed and edited into a movie format and submitted by due date for a final grade. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

JPN 347 Business Japanese

Prerequisite, JPN 345, or equivalent ability. Business Japanese course aims at understanding of Japanese Business protocol as well as mastering high level of Japanese communication skills for business settings. This course will assist students to learn advanced Japanese grammar, sentence patterns, and fixed expressions necessary for smooth business activities by means of grammar study, vocabulary building, and roll-plays. The emphasis will be on the understanding Japanese culture and people, particularly Japanese Business culture and protocol, while discussing common misunderstandings and comical mistakes foreign businessmen make dealing with Japanese counterparts. We will use the most current DVD which is actually used by Japanese companies in Japan to train new non-Japanese employees. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

JPN 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

JPN 478 Japanese History and Civilization

Prerequisite, JPN 345, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor. The study of the geography, culture in different historical periods, people and society in contemporary Japan, and Japan's place and roles in the world. The class will be conducted in Japanese. Student-centered class with discussions and research. We use the textbook written in Japanese on Japanese History to polish up advanced level Japanese language skills. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

JPN 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–9 credits.

JPN 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

JPN 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, seniors who have fulfilled advanced courses in Japanese. A student presents his/her research theme to an instructor at the beginning of the semester. A theme must be related to Japanese culture, arts, language, and society. Once an instructor and the Department approve the theme, the student presents more concrete plan that includes methods, resources, bibliography, and such. The student starts his/her research with an instructor's guidance. The thesis has to be written in Japanese. (Offered every year.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Latin

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I

This course introduces Latin as the root of modern European languages; it emphasizes the relationship of the Romance languages and the Romance roots of the English vocabulary. No previous knowledge of Latin is required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II

Prerequisite, LAT 101. This course introduces Latin as the root of modern European languages; it emphasizes the relationship of the Romance languages and the Romance roots of the English vocabulary. No previous knowledge of Latin is required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I

Prerequisite, LAT 102. Continue with mastery of basic vocabulary and structural patters, pronunciation, and discussion of issues of classical Roman culture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

LAT 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, LAT 102, or consent of instructor. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

LAT 499 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Portuguese

PORT 101 Elementary Portuguese I

Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. The class is conducted in Portuguese. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PORT 102 Elementary Portuguese II

Prerequisite, PORT 101. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. Through intensified reading and composition writing students also explore the diverse geography and culture of the Portuguese speaking world. The class is conducted in Portuguese. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PORT 201 Intermediate Portuguese I

Prerequisite, PORT 102. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. The class is conducted in Portuguese. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Spanish

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I

Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. The class is conducted in Spanish. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II

Prerequisite, SPAN 101. Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. The class is conducted in Spanish. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SPAN 104 Intensive Elementary Spanish

Prerequisite, two or more years of high school Spanish with a gap of two or more years in the study of the language, or SPAN 101, or consent of instructor. Mastery of a basic vocabulary and structural patterns, pronunciation, an overview of Spanish geography and customs. One hour per week of lab required. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

SPAN 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

Prerequisite, SPAN 102. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. Through intensified reading and composition writing students also explore the diverse geography and culture of the Hispanic world. The class is conducted in Spanish. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SPAN 201B Spanish for Business

Prerequisite, SPAN 102. Spanish for Business give students a basic foundation in vocabulary and discourses related to functional business areas, practice in carrying out typical business transactions, and practice in writing commercial documents. Translations and interpretations are also important parts of this course. The course will provide the student with the necessary skills to function effectively within the Spanish business world in the Unites States, as well as in Spanish speaking countries. The vocabulary and grammar will provide the student with the confidence needed when dealing with different business environments such as banking, management, the modern business office, marketing, finance, and imports-exports. Close attention will be placed on culture, since the business world in Latin America and Spain, works differently from that of the United States. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 201H Intermediate Spanish/Spanish for Health Professionals

Prerequisite, SPAN 102, or consent of instructor. This course provides basic health-related Spanish conversation skills and vocabulary for those who work in the health professions using the terminology necessary in medical settings. The course introduces Hispanic customs and culture and continues to build a solid grammar foundation for the study of Spanish. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Prerequisite, SPAN 201. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. Through intensified reading and composition writing students also explore the diverse geography and culture of the Hispanic world. The class is conducted in Spanish. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SPAN 202H Intermediate Spanish II/Spanish for Health Care Professionals II

Prerequisite, SPAN 201H. This course is a continuation of Spanish for Health Care Professionals I. It is designed to provide basic health-related Spanish conversation skills and vocabulary for those who work in the health professions using the terminology necessary in medical settings. The course introduces Hispanic customs and culture and continues to build a solid grammar foundation for the study of Spanish. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 290 Independent Internship

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SPAN 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

SPAN 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SPAN 326 Reading and Interpreting Literature

Prerequisite, SPAN 343, or 344, or consent of instructor. Students develop reading and writing skills with the aim of attaining literacy in Spanish. Strategies and techniques for interpreting literary works in light of cultural context are emphasized. Required before enrolling in all upper–division literature courses. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SPAN 329 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in language pedagogy. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

SPAN 343 Advanced Grammar and Composition

Prerequisite, SPAN 202, or consent of instructor. This course includes a detailed review of Spanish grammar and a rigorous writing component which will allow the student to perfect Spanish composition skills through drafts, revisions, and final projects. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SPAN 344 Spanish Writing Workshop

Prerequisite, SPAN 202, or consent of instructor. Intensive development of writing skills in the context of worldwide Hispanic cultures. Particular emphasis will be given to the development of writing expository essays and creative compositions in Spanish. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 345 Spanish Conversation

Prerequisite, SPAN 202, or consent of instructor. This course further develops the communicative competence of students in Spanish, focusing on the oral expression of one's own ideas and opinions. In addition to speaking, the course includes the acquisition of new vocabulary, the development of socio-cultural competence, a grammar review, and exposure to listening, reading, and to a lesser degree writing. The textbook provides plenty of material and opportunities for discussion and debate. Each one of its six chapters is introduced by an award-winning short-feature film. The theme is further explored through a series of literary, journalistic, and other types of texts and speaking activities. Communicative competence will be measured by fluency, pronunciation, use of general conversational strategies such as paraphrasing skills, an extensive active vocabulary, and grammar. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 375, 376 Literature and Culture of Spain I, II

Prerequisite, SPAN 326, or consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to a variety of literary genres (poetry, drama, essay, novel, short story) and cultural aspects of Spain (art, history, geography, music, philosophy) from medieval times through the 20th century. (Offered alternate years.) 3, 3 credits.

SPAN 377, 378 Literature and Culture of Latin America I, II

Prerequisite, SPAN 326, or consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to a variety of literary genres and cultural aspects of Latin America (art, history, geography, music, philosophy) from its beginnings to present times. Includes readings of representative authors in the areas of drama, essay fiction, and poetry. (Offered alternate years.) 3, 3 credits.

SPAN 396 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

Prerequisite, successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor. This course introduces students to the field of linguistics with an emphasis on Spanish. Fundamental concepts are examined to provide a broad understanding of human language. Analytic techniques and theoretical principles are used to discover and describe phonological, morphological, and syntactic patterns. This course also deals with diachronic and sociolinguistic variation. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SPAN 397 United States Latino Literatures and Cultures

Prerequisite, SPAN 326, or consent of instructor. In this course students are introduced to a broad range of U.S. Latino/a literary genres and to critical and analytical materials concerning the production of literatures and cultures of the Americas. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SPAN 398 20th Century Latin American Fiction: Journeys Across Memory

Prerequisite, SPAN 326, or consent of instructor. This course examines Latin American short stories and novels published in the 20th century. The main themes to be analyzed are exile, psychological traces of repression, personal and collective memory, and the rewriting of history. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SPAN 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them in-depth study on a specific topic. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SPAN 440 A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism

Prerequisite, any 300–level course, or consent of instructor. This course provides a broad understanding of bilingualism from sociolinguistic, ideological, psychological, and educational perspectives. Students examine theoretical concepts and selected case studies that focus on Spanish bilingualisms around the world, the complex interrelations between social factors and linguistic practices, the role of language in the construction of identity, and the structural impacts of language contact. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 441 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

Prerequisite, SPAN 202, or consent of instructor. After a general introduction to the subfields of phonetics and phonology, this course focuses on the description, production, and representation of Spanish sounds. The sound system, distinctive suprasegmental features such as stress and intonation, and syllable patterns of Spanish are analyzed through various exercises. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SPAN 470 Techno Writing and Global Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Culture

Prerequisite, SPAN 326, or consent of instructor. The course examines new trends in 21st century themes and genres in Latin American literature and culture. The main approach will be the study of cyber literature, techno writing, including blogs, twitters and other representations of literature through technology. Young writers/bloggers in various Latin American countries are using fiction and testimony to both address political, social and historical matters as well as to promote different forms of resistance. Writers include Yoani Sánchez, Laura Alcoba, José Antonio Ponte, Edmundo Paz-Soldán and others. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SPAN 484 20th Century Spanish Poetry and Drama: Literary Pictures

Prerequisite, SPAN 326. This course examines theatrical and poetic texts in 20th century Spain in conjunction with artistic representations of or within the texts. Some poets and playwrights to be included are Frederico Garcia Lorca, Miguel Hernandez, Rafael Alberti, Antonio Buero Vallejo, and Alfonso Sastre. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SPAN 485 Hispanic Theatre in Dialogue with the Classics: A Workshop for Dramatic Creations

Prerequisite, 300 level SPAN course or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor. This course examines dramatic works from Spain, Mexico, Argentina in light of classical inter-textual references: Greek tragedies, classical art, and historical accounts. It explores the concept of “intertextuality” as regards the study of dramatic texts in dialogue with the historical past and investigates such themes as social repression, war in conjunction with artistic expression, politics, and power. Students will create their own short plays using the dramatic techniques explored in class and will perform in a public arena. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SPAN 490 Independent Internship

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SPAN 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

SPAN 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet specific needs of superior students, providing them in–depth study on a specific topic. Course content is chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.