Department of History

Jennifer Keene, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Harran, Keene, Slayton;

Associate Professors: Bay, Cumiford, Estes;

Assistant Professors: Vieira–Martinez;

Instructor: Klein.

Bachelor of Arts in History

History is our collective memory, an understanding of our heritage, of who we are and how we came to be. The history major not only provides students with the knowledge and tools of history, but also provides a sense of roots, as well as a broader perspective on the diverse regions and peoples of the world. Training in history teaches students how to think, how to analyze different kinds of problems and is solid training for such careers as teaching, law, business, historic preservation or archival management.

Departmental Honors

The history faculty award departmental honors to graduating senior history majors who have demonstrated outstanding academic work in history. To be considered for departmental honors, students must achieve a GPA that ranks them in the top 25 percent of senior history majors. The department also gives an outstanding senior award each year to a graduating senior based on GPA, participation in Phi Alpha Theta and quality of the senior thesis.

Extracurricular Opportunities

In addition to an outstanding curriculum, the major in history at Chapman offers students opportunities to work on projects associated with the Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education. The department also offers study abroad experiences in London and other cities. Internships at area archives and museums are available. Membership in Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honors society, is offered to students with a GPA of 3.100 in 12 credits of history courses and an overall GPA of 3.000. Phi Alpha Theta sponsors graduate school workshops, lectures, films and trips that are open to all members of the Chapman community. Members of Phi Alpha Theta enjoy opportunities to travel to regional and national student conferences to deliver papers and can enter competitions for scholarships and prizes offered by the national Phi Alpha Theta headquarters.

Bachelor of Arts in History

History majors are encouraged to study abroad, but in order to fulfill the major requirements, history majors are advised to complete semester study abroad programs before the spring of their junior year. To take advantage of potential research opportunities students are encouraged to discuss their study abroad plans, including any related language study with their faculty advisors in their freshmen year. History majors are especially encouraged to take history department sponsored travel courses.

All courses in the major must be taken for a letter grade. A minimum of 21 credits must be upper–division. Students must maintain a minimum of 2.000 GPA in the major.

requirements (45 credits)

HIST 296

History Seminar

3

HIST 398

The Historian's Craft

3

Four 100–level history courses

12

Three 200–level history courses

9

Four 300–level history courses

12

HIST 496

Integrated Senior Seminar I

3

HIST 498

Integrated Senior Seminar II

3

total credits

45

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.A. in History.

Minors in the Department of History

Minor in History

A Minor in History requires a total of 21 credits in history with at least 12 upper–division credits.

Minor in History and Media

A Minor in History and Media is devoted specifically to examining the impact of film, photography and other forms of mass media on the interpretation of historical events. In this minor, students will consider the value of these materials as historical documents, as agents of historical change and as appropriate media for presenting history. A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

core requirements (6 credits)

HIST 252

History and Film

3

HIST 296

History Seminar

3

five of the following (15 credits)

COM 151

Mass Communication

3

TWP 246

History of Television

3

HIST 254

British History Through Films and Documentaries

3

HIST 256

Film and American History

3

HIST 258

Latin American History Through Film

3

HIST 260

Asian History and Film

3

HIST 333

Images of American History

3

ART 367

History of Photography

3

ANTH 372

Images of American Indians

3

HIST 388

Technology and the Media in the United States

3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Holocaust History

The minor includes study of the origins and history of the Holocaust within the context of European history and an exploration of the central themes and topics in current Holocaust research. In support of their classroom learning, students may participate in extracurricular opportunities through the Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education lecture series which brings to campus Holocaust survivors and eminent scholars. A minimum of 12 credits must be upper–division.

core requirements (9 credits)

HIST 296

History Seminar

3

HIST 297

The Holocaust in History and Film

3

HIST 499

Individual Study

3

one of the following (3 credits)

HIST 307

Germany and the Holocaust

3

HIST 365a

Perpetrators, Witnesses and Rescuers

3

HIST 365b

The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories

3

three of the following (9 credits)

HIST 204

From the Garden of Eden to the Black Death: Jewish History to 1500

3

HIST 234

3,000 Years of Jewish History

3

HIST 255

From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500

3

HIST 310

Modern Europe

3

POSC 323

Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity

3

POSC 328

Human Rights Law

3

HIST 335

World War I

3

HIST 337

World War II

3

FREN 351

French Writers of the Holocaust

3

GER 351

The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

3

HIST 357

History of Jewish Migration

3

HIST 358

Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler

3

HIST 398

The Historian's Craft

3

EDUC 434

Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourses and Social Action

3

total credits

 

21

Course Descriptions – History

HIST 101 United States History Survey I

A look at all the major themes from 1607 through the Civil War, including the founding of a new nation. Topics include slavery, states' rights, religion, and the beginning of the Westward movement. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 103 United States History Survey II

This course examines the basic issues of American life, culture, society , and economics from 1865 to the present, while considering such questions as who is an American, and how we have evolved. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 110 Western Civilization: From Mesopotamia to the Renaissance

A survey of Western Civilization from its beginnings in the river valleys of the Tigris, the Euphrates, and the Nile to the intellectual and artistic glories of the Italian Renaissance. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 112 Western Civilization: From the Reformation to Modern Times

A survey of Western civilization from the Reformation to the political, social, and intellectual upheavals of the 20th century. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 134 The Historian as a Sleuth: Crime in 19th-Century Britain

Students will learn not only about crime in 19th-century Britain, but also what history as a discipline is all about and how historians do research, interpret what they have discovered and present their findings. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 160 African Voices: African History to 1800

This course explores the history of African civilizations from 16,000 BC through the transformations of the Atlantic slave trade. Topics include how Africans exploited their environments, organized their societies, and built their communities in the face of shifting historical circumstances. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 170 Why Africa Matters: African History 1800 - Present

This course surveys economic, political, and social innovations in the 19th century, and African responses to occupation in the 20th century and how Africans reconstructed their societies as independent, post-colonial nation-states. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 180 Modern Latin American History

This course examines the development of political institutions, social changes, and interactions throughout the Americas, Latin American–United States relations, racial and cultural issues, and the question of economic development. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 190 From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia

This course focuses on China, Japan, and Korea during and after their tumultuous transition to modernity. Using legal documents, memoirs, films, and cultural artifacts, we will study the development of modern East Asia, empire, war, and the globalization of East Asian popular culture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet the specific needs of superior students, this course provides students with an in-depth study of a specific area of research. Course content and goals are chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

HIST 200 A History of Sexuality

This course explores sexual behavior and gender relations, including biological, cultural, economic, religious, and political aspects from early hunter-gather societies to the present. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 201 The Rise of World Civilizations

This course covers world history from pre–historic times through the Middle Ages, emphasizing discoveries in paleontology, paleoanthropology, archaeology, the earliest centers of civilizations, the origins of civic culture in Asia and the Mediterranean world, the impact of the great world religions, and the intellectual achievements of the Middle Ages. Cultural and physical geography will be stressed in this course. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 202 Modern World Civilizations

This course covers world cultures from the European Renaissance through the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the Reformation, scientific revolution, African kingdoms, India and the Ottoman Empire, the Far East, Western imperialism, and war and conflict in the twentieth century. Cultural and physical geography will be stressed in this course. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 204 From the Garden of Eden to the Black Death: Jewish History to 1500

This course explores the history of Jewish civilizations from the first millennium BCE to 1500. Topics include Israelite culture, exodus to Babylon and diaspora, life under Greek and Roman rule, and relations with Christians and Muslims. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 210 Modern Middle East History

(Same as POSC 210.) An introductory course on the history of the modern Middle East and North Africa, beginning in the sixteenth century and running to the present. Students encounter both great ideas and ordinary lives, and gain a conceptual and contextual understanding of current events. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 220 The Vietnam Wars

A study of Vietnam from the earliest times to early 21st century from five broad approaches: the origins of the Vietnamese people and their civilization, the era of Chinese political and cultural ascendancy, French colonization and Vietnamese nationalism, post–World War II military conflicts with France and the United States, and post–1975 attempts to chart a course to modernization. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 221 Native American History: The Struggle to Be Heard

This course surveys the history of the American Indian from contact to the present day. The primary focus will be on the historical experience of Indian people and their struggle to retain their cultural autonomy in the face of the changing world around them. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 223 The Sixties

This course covers the 1960s era through the early Nixon Administration (1970) with special emphasis on the Civil Rights movement. Topics addressed in the course include: The Cold War, resurgence of the cult of domesticity, the Great Society, the Vietnam War, the evolution of the counter-culture movement, and the Women's Rights movement. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 224 United States Women's History

This course explores the roles that women have played in American history from colonial times until the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impediments to their full participation in American society and to the ways that these impediments have been overcome or removed. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 226 Modern European Women's History

From the French Revolution through World War II, this course examines women's changing social, economic, cultural, and political roles as revealed in primary sources such as diaries, letters, treaties, contemporary media, and secondary sources of memoir and film. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 227 American Intellectual History

This course examines the major figures and ideas that have shaped America and its citizenry from the early colonial settlements to the end of the 19th century. Topics include religion and the Enlightenment, liberty and equality, democracy and republicanism, romantic impulses, and transcendentalism. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 229 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HIST 230 Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865

This course surveys the historical experience of people of Mexican descent in the “American Southwest” and the formation of Chicano/a identity and culture before 1865. Topics include the pre-Columbian past, the Spanish colonial era, the Mexican national period, the Texas revolution, the U.S.-Mexico War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. (Offered yearly.) 3 credits.

HIST 231 Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-Present

This course surveys the historical experience of people of Mexican descent in the “American Southwest” and the formation of Chicano/a identity and culture in the period after 1848. Topics include the internal dynamics of the community, external struggles, and contemporary concerns. (Offered ever year.) 3 credits.

HIST 233 Disability and American Life

This course will explore the social, political, and economic treatment of people with disabilities in America throughout its history and in contemporary society. The course will examine the changes that have occurred for people with disabilities from World War I to the present, including the rise of the disability rights movement in the 1970’s, the effect the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the contributions of disabled writers, artists, and activists. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 234 3,000 Years of Jewish History

This course will examine major transformations and continuities in Jewish life from biblical times to the present day. It will trace the ways in which Jews understood and negotiated their cultural, religious, and political identities. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 240 History of America through Sport

The course will provide a social history of America from the middle of the 19th century through the present day through the lens of sports. The technological advances in transportation and later communication allowed for the development of organized sports which quickly came to reflect the prejudices, aspirations, values and character of the nation. The goals of the course will be to examine major trends in the United States in relation to ethnic and gender relations, economics, technology, and government in order to understand not only the trends as they occurred but also how professional sports reflected and impacted these issues. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 252 History and Film

This course presents major themes in world history through the interpretation of films based on historical events such as war, imperialism, and revolution to politics, culture, and technology. Students will critically examine the impact of motion pictures on the interpretation of history. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 254 British History Through Films and Documentaries

This course explores the nature and impact of the cinematic arts on historical interpretations of British Isles countries over the past thousand years. Through the critical analysis of feature films and documentaries on historical topics, students will scrutinize the effectiveness of films as a source of historical interpretation and knowledge. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 255 From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500

This course explores the history of Jewish civilizations from the Early Modern period until the present day. Topics include Jewish mysticism and Hassidic culture, Zionism, migration, Holocaust, ethnic groups, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 256 Film and American History

This course examines the role of motion pictures and the motion picture industry in American history. Students explore the ways that motion pictures have influenced and transformed American culture, politics, and society in the twentieth century. Particular attention will be paid to Hollywood's 1910–1950 "golden era." (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 258 Latin American History Through Film

This course examines major themes in Latin American history through documentary and dramatic films. Important topics include the European-Native American encounter, the Iberian colonial legacy, independence and revolution, Unites States-Latin American relations, and the military’s role in the twentieth century politics. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 260 Asian History and Film

A study of Asian history from the earliest times to early twenty–first century through motion pictures and documentaries. Topics include Asian–made films which deal with modern themes, and non–Asian productions to introduce and examine the topic of "orientalism." (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 262 History of the Samurai

This course explores the evolution of a military society in Japan between 1000–1870. Topics include the evolution of armor, tactics, the military and social organization of the samurai, the status of women, and the political economy across eight centuries. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 263 Modern Japan

This course examines how from 1868 Japan was set on a crash course with modernity that eventually led to empire, World War II, atomic destruction, the Allied Occupation, and a postwar resurgence as an economic powerhouse in Asia and the world. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 264 Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory

We explore the lives of the colonizers and colonized who experienced empire and the intricacies of war in East Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We also examine the political implications concerning the memory of empire and war today. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 270 Creating Leadership in African History

This course surveys varied expressions of community leadership and authority evident in African history. Topics include sources of authority, innovations in the practice of power, and the sources that historians have used to trace the transformations in each. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 271 Language, Space and Power in African History

This course examines language use in African history as an active expression of power used to shape community space. Topics include Sub-Saharan language changes as the cumulative consequence of numerous personal choices precipitated by specific historical circumstances. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 272 African in America

This course looks at the African Diaspora 1500-2000 in the Americas with a comparative lens, beginning with varied community origins, through migration experiences, and into the lives created in Diaspora. Particular attention is paid to the social networks, cultural histories, and performance arts of the immigrants and the American communities they helped to create. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 273 Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past

This course looks at the meaning of women’s strength, power, and status in early African societies. Students combine readings of recent scholarship with fieldwork to reconsider the meaning of literature that pathologized women of African origin as man-dominating matriarchal figures, or silent victims. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 275 Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History

An intertwined narrative of Iran and Iraq, beginning with a condensed early history, but concentrating on the 19th-21st centuries. Students look at the interplay of war, politics, culture, and religion, and explore the ancient roots and complex character of both nations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

HIST 296 History Seminar

Prerequisites, history major, or minor, and sophomore standing, consent of instructor. This course is a seminar that focuses on the critical reading of texts, developing historical arguments, debates among historians, and changing historical interpretations. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 297 The Holocaust in History and Film

An introduction to the history of the Holocaust, from initial persecution to the implementation of the Final Solution, including the actions of perpetrators, rescuers, and resisters, the dilemmas facing those targeted for persecution, and major issues in the interpretation and visual representation of the Holocaust. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet the specific needs of superior students, this course provides students with an in-depth study of a specific area of research. Course content and goals are chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HIST 304 The Ancient Mediterranean World

(Same as REL 304.) This course covers the ancient Mediterranean world with emphasis on prehistory and the cultures of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean Sea, Greece, and Rome. Special attention is given to the development of democratic and republican institutions, political theory, literature, economics, art and architecture, and diplomacy and war. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 305 Cooking, Clothes, and Comics: History of Daily Life in Modern Europe

This course examines how daily practices like eating, dressing, and reading, shaped modern European society. How did such ordinary practices promote ideologies as diverse as colonialism, fascism, and socialism? (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 306 The Middle Ages

(Same as REL 306.) This course examines the history of Europe from 500–1500 C.E. through the themes and events that shaped this period. Topics include feudalism, the development of scholastic theology, and the launching of the Crusades. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 307 Germany and the Holocaust

(Same as REL 307.)

HIST 308 Early Modern Europe

This course examines humanism, religious fragmentation, state building, imperialism, secularization, and Enlightenment in the period between the Italian Renaissance and the French Revolution when Europe emerged from the relative obscurity of the Middle Ages to become the world's dominant civilization. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 310 Modern Europe

This course traces the tumultuous history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the collapse of the Soviet Empire and the rise and fall of European hegemony. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 311 Russian History

This course traces the history of Russia and the Soviet Union from the fall of the Romanov Dynasty through the demise of the Soviet government and the creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 312 History of Spain and Portugal

This course examines the history of the Iberian peninsula from pre–historic times through the modern era. Topics include Roman Iberia, Islamic, and Catholic Spain in the Middle Ages, the Iberian Empires, Spain's decline as a great power, and contemporary Spanish and Portuguese society. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 313 Modern British History

This course traces the rise and development of British civilization from the glorious revolution of 1688 to the present. Topics include the British Empire, the Industrial Revolution, the development of parliamentary institutions, the changing role of the monarch, Britain in the World Wars, and British foreign relations. (Offered alternative years.) 3 credits.

HIST 315 Archaeology of Ancient Israel

(Same as REL 315.)

HIST 317 On the Move! Migrations in World History

This course examines the political, economic, and social reasons for voluntary and forced migrations in the world in the last 500 years such as the African slave trade, British colonialists, the Jewish diaspora, and US immigration. Students will explore immigrant cultures through food, clothes, language, religion, work, and gender roles. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 319 Israel/Palestine: 3000 Years

(Same as PCST 319, POSC 319.) This course provides a long view on the conflict by exploring the historical background and showing the deep roots of both nations. Students encounter the ancient world through archaeology, explore Palestine through the ages, and witness the lives of real people on all sides. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 323 Journalists as Historians

(Same as ENG 323.)

HIST 326 The African-American Historical Experience

This course traces the history of the African–American experience from the earliest days of slavery through emancipation, the rise of Jim Crow, the civil rights movement, and the modern era. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 328 American Colonial History

This course studies the period of American colonial history from the earliest contact between native tribes and Europeans to 1763. Emphasis will be placed on studying the period from multiple perspectives including political, cultural, and economic points of view, and interaction between Indian, European, and African peoples. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 329 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

HIST 330 America and Its Revolution: The Bonfires of Change

Students examine one of the most tumultuous times in American history and analyze and interpret the events that form the foundation of, not only our system of democracy, but of much of our identity as Americans. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 332 Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction

This course examines the institution and experience of slavery, the causes of the Civil War, the roles that generals, politicians, and ordinary citizens played in the conflict, key battles, why the South lost the war, the eradication of slavery, and the incorporation of freedmen into civic life in the postwar period. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 333 Images of American History

A picture tells a thousand words, but does it tell the truth? This course investigates the rich and complex catalog of historical images created by documentary photographers over the last 160 years by using historical photography to examine American history from the 1840s to the present. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 335 World War I

World War I is a defining event of the twentieth century that shaped much of the Western world and propelled the United States into a position of world leadership economic, diplomatic, and cultural affairs. Topics include how ideology, economics, geography, culture, leadership, and technology combined to create an unanticipated total war. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 336 Conflict and Change in America: 1920–1945

Covering the prosperity and cynicism of the Roaring Twenties, the poverty of the Great Depression and the New Deal’s response to it, and the violence of the Second World War, this course examines and interprets the culture and politics that shaped this era. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 337 World War II

A comprehensive review of the great mid–twentieth century catastrophe that consumed the world and forever altered history. Major topics include the diplomatic and economic background and the roles of propaganda, non–combatants, and the home fronts, as well as a wide-ranging review of the military aspects. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 338 America After the War, 1945–1960

This course examines this critical period in American history, which featured the rise of the Cold War and rock and roll. Topics include the American economy, politics, culture, and social structure. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 339 Immigration, Border Consciousness and the Chicano Experience

This course uses art, popular culture, and mass media to investigate the histories of immigration, and the creation of transnational identity within the United States. Topics include border consciousness and border communities as historical sites of conflict and resistance. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 340 American Diplomatic History and Foreign Policy

This course focuses on the origin and development of United States foreign policy. Topics include the role of ideology in foreign policy, economics and foreign affairs, isolationism, American dominance of the Western Hemisphere, and the consequences of increasing international interdependence. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 342 The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life and Death

History is not just something presidents and Supreme Court justices do; rather, it is something that our ancestors lived in the past. This course takes an interpretive look at how and why many of our most basic rituals and activities have changed over the years. Includes such topics as childbirth and children's games. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 346 Travel Course: Topics in Historical Tours

An extended tour of another country or countries, or a part of the United States, with a concentrated study of the history and culture of that country or countries, or United States region. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 346e The Grand Tour

This course introduces students to the Grand Tour, an educational journey undertaken by young English aristocrats in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. The history, culture, and politics of London, Paris, and Rome in this period will be examined in depth. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

HIST 346g The Roman Imperium

This course introduces students to the study of ancient Roman history through field excursions to sites and structures and the study of museum and cultural artifacts in Southern England, London, Paris, and Rome. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

HIST 346h Paris, A Literary History

(Same as FREN 353.)

HIST 346i A Tale of Two Cities

The Tale of Two Cities is a famous novel by Charles Dickens about Paris and London at the time of the French Revolution. In this travel/study course by the same name students will spend ten days in each of these two cities during the interterm period. Instructors knowledgeable about these cities will offer tours, museum visits and theatre outings on a regular basis. However, at the center of this course is a self-chosen and self-designed research project that looks at some aspect of the life in and history of London and Paris. Alternatively, History majors can arrange to do research on their Senior Seminar papers. In both cases, students will closely coordinate their research with the faculty member directing the course in each city. Fee: TBD (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

HIST 347 Topics in Transformative Encounters

Historical research in the study of travel, movement, and the origins of American identity outside of the contiguous US, with preparatory reading of the historiography, and travel to another country. The course aims to bring together the historical American experience with the history of peoples not generally recognized as American in the dominant discourse. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 347a African in America

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This travel course looks at the African Diaspora 1500-2000 in the Americas with a comparative lens, beginning with varied community origins, through migration experiences, and into the lives created in Diaspora. Particular attention is paid to the social networks, cultural histories, and performance arts of the immigrants and the American communities they helped to create. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 348 Topics in European Cultural and Intellectual History

Students explore key themes in the cultural and intellectual history of Europe. Courses that treat different themes may be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 348b Makers of Modern Culture

The cultural and intellectual character of the modern world can be traced to a series of related conceptual innovations and artistic transformations between the late nineteenth century and the eve of World War II. Topics include such seminal figures as Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Keynes, Einstein, and Joyce. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 351 Fire in the Rainforest: Central African History

This course explores the experiences of Central Africans from the belief systems of rainforest communities, through the diverse cultures, states, and economic networks of the last millennium. Topics include innovations of the Atlantic age, opposition to colonialism, and modern socioeconomics. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 352 Chinese Civilization

A study of China from earliest times to the mid–1990s from five broad perspectives: the composition of the Chinese people, elite thought and behavior, family life, popular culture, and the economy. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 353 Slavery and Slave Trade in an Atlantic World

This course examines four centuries of Atlantic relationships from the dialogue between African and European kings, through political economics and communications that created a new Atlantic Ocean world, ending with diverse interests that pushed for abolition of the exportation of enslaved Africans. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 354 From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan

What did modernity mean for the Japanese people? Topics include the way of the warrior, the fall of feudalism, Westernization, gender, male–male sexuality, epidemics and modern medicine, war, empire, occupation, economic recovery, and the decadent 1980s. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 355 Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia

This course focuses on the effects of disease, medical limitations, and popular practices in East Asia. Cholera, the plague, western medicine, the medicalization of sex, and the relation between science, war, and imperialism are examined to uncover the history of medicine and the body. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 357 History of Jewish Migration

Migration has played a central role in shaping Jewish experience from ancient times to the present day. This course will explore how migrations impacted collective Jewish identity, as well as how Jewish religion and tradition responded to dislocation. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 358 Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler

This course surveys the history of Jews in France, Germany, and Italy, from their civil emancipation in the wake of the French Revolution, and up to the post-Holocaust period. Students will explore the tumultuous changes that took place in Western Europe over the last 200 years, and the effect they had on the Jewish minority. We will examine how Jews’ initial experience of equality gave way to racial persecution and murder, and finally, to the post-war rehabilitation of survivors. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 359 Elie Wiesel: Life and Works

(Same as ENG 359, REL 359.) Prerequisite, written inquiry. This course is an intensive study of selected writings by Elie Wiesel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. Readings will include works of fiction and non-fiction. In addition, students will read a brief history of the Holocaust by Doris Bergen and an interpretive work on oral and written memory by Lawrence Langer. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 362 The Golden Age of Islam

This course studies the Islamic world from the life and times of Muhammad, through the heights of the Gunpowder Empires in the seventeenth century. Students will interact with cultural production – art, science, literature, philosophy – and study the historical and social forces that shaped the Middle East. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 363 The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution

(Same as POSC 363.) This course surveys the Arab states of the Middle East and North Africa from Napoleon's invasion in 1798 to the revolutionary turmoil of 2011. Students will explore the unique cultures and character of each region, and specific challenges they face in the transition to modernity. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 365 Topics in the Holocaust

(Same as REL 365.) This course examines selected topics within the study of Holocaust history, such as the roles of doctors, theologians, and religion under Hitler, the persecution of non–Jewish groups (including homosexuals and gypsies), and the experiences and choices of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. Courses that treat different themes may be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 365a Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers

(Same as REL 365a.) Within the context of Nazi Germany, World War II and the Holocaust, this course examines the choices that individuals faced and the decisions that defined them as perpetrators or rescuers. Includes the stories of those who survived the Holocaust to become witnesses to the truth. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 365b The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories

This course explores the complex history of the Holocaust from the perspective of selected memoirs written by survivors and examines the contributions and limitations of memoirs in shaping the historical record. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

HIST 369 History of Terrorism in the United States

This course examines the major acts of terrorism in the United States from the American Revolution to the present by critically analyzing the major political, intellectual, economic, and cultural impact of these events. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 371 U.S. Business and Entrepreneurial History

(Same as ECON 371.)

HIST 372 California History

An in–depth examination of California from its discovery in 1542 to the present. Topics include how the Golden State has changed, the roles of mining, Indians, agriculture, high technology, Japanese–American relations, and the mission system. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 373 U.S. Economic History

(Same as ECON 373.)

HIST 374 European Economic History

(Same as ECON 374.)

HIST 388 Technology and the Media in the United States

This course considers the impact of technology change on the United States from the Industrial Revolution to the Computer Age. Topics include the role of the media and mass communications in economic and political change, the shaping of utopian visions, gender relations, and the West’s relationship with the non-Western world. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 392 Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin America

This course covers the Native American-European encounter of the early 16th century and colonial control and establishment of European institutions in Latin America. Topics include politics, the economy, diplomatic and military affairs, and the intellectual life of the colonies. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 395 Technology in Historical Research, Analysis and Pedagogy

Students are introduced to a variety of new technologies in a workshop format, exploring the possibilities of adapting readily available technologies to scholarly historical research, and experimenting with each in support of their existing or future research interests. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HIST 396 Mexican History

This course examines the history of greater Mexico (including the northern borderlands) from the ancient Aztec and Mayan empires through the most recent economic and political upheavals. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HIST 398 The Historian's Craft

Prerequisite, HIST 296, or consent of instructor. This course introduces students to the philosophy of history and historical thought, historical methodology, and the craft of doing history. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 399 Individual Study and Research

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet the specific needs of superior students, this course provides students with an in-depth study of a specific area of research. Course content and goals are chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HIST 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

HIST 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

HIST 496 Integrated Senior Seminar I

Prerequisite, HIST 398, or consent of instructor. The first half of the required capstone experience. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 498 Integrated Senior Seminar II

Prerequisite, HIST 496. The second half of the required capstone experience for history majors. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HIST 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to meet the specific needs of superior students, this course provides students with an in-depth study of a specific area of research. Course content and goals are chosen in conference between the instructor and student. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.