Department of English

Joanna Levin, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Axelrod, Bausch, Fuery, Gunner, Nakell, Paterno, Quinn, Ruppel, Yeager;

Associate Professors: Blaylock, Leahy, Lehnhof, Levin, O'Brien, Zoellner;

Assistant Professors: Glaser, Hall, Jankowski, Lewis, Magosaki, Osborn, Van Meter;

Instructors: Kozameh, Sweet;

Lecturer: Read–Davidson.

Bachelor of Arts in English

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Master of Arts in English

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The mission of the Department of English is to exemplify and encourage the ability to think creatively and critically and to express ideas with clarity and intellectual rigor, to develop a detailed knowledge of several cultural tradition and to foster the desire to explore related fields of study, such as psychology, history, philosophy, linguistics, sociology and religious studies. The department provides Chapman students with innovative and rigorous instruction in critical thinking and writing skills, in–depth knowledge of the world's literary traditions and a basis for lifelong learning in an interdisciplinary context.

English degree programs give students knowledge and skills they can use to succeed in many careers. English is particularly useful as a double major or minor in combination with business, pre–law, social work, government, pre–med and media studies. English alumni employ their highly sought–after thinking and communication skills as copy editors, advertising executives, software developers, reporters, technical writers, teachers and professors.

Extracurricular Opportunities

In addition to an outstanding curriculum, the major in English at Chapman offers students opportunities and activities in a variety of academic and professional areas including:

Departmental Honors

The department faculty awards departmental honors to students who have demonstrated outstanding work in their area. Requirements for consideration are nomination by a faculty member and a GPA of 3.330 in the major.

Bachelor of Arts in English

Under the guidance of faculty advisors, English majors complete a program in one of two areas of study: literature, rhetoric and cultural studies or journalism. Each student is required to take the 18–credit English core, in addition to a 24–30 credit area of study.

English core course requirements (18 credits)

ENG 221

Literature I (antiquity to 1400 CE)

3

ENG 222

Literature II (1400–1800 CE)

3

ENG 223

Literature III (1800 CE–Present)

3

ENG 256

Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

3

ENG 270

Foundations of Rhetorical Studies

3

ENG 498A

Senior Seminar in Literature and Rhetoric or

3

ENG 498B

Senior Seminar Journalism

 

area of study requirements (24–30 credits)

Students complete requirements for literature, rhetoric and cultural studies or journalism area of study

24–30

total credits

literature, rhetoric and cultural studies area of study

42

total credits

journalism area of study

48

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation for B.A. in English.

literature, rhetoric and cultural studies area of study (24 credits)

At least 21 of the 24 elective credits must be at the upper–division level and at least six credits must be at the 400–level. Although many courses satisfy elective requirements in multiple areas (in the diversity, pre–1850, post–1850 and additional elective categories), elective courses cannot be double–counted.

electives (18 credits)

two courses from each group

Diversity: world literature, comparative literature, literature in translation, film and gender, women's literature or multicultural literature

Pre–1850: literature written before 1850

Post–1850: literature written after 1850

diversity (6 credits)

two of the following*

ENG 240

World Literature to 400 CE

3

ENG 242

World Literature from 400–1600 CE

3

ENG 244

World Literature from 1600–1900 CE

3

ENG 302

Writing About Diverse Cultures

3

ENG 327

Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

3

ENG 339

World Literature from 1900 to the present

3

ENG 447

Topics in Comparative Literature

3

ENG 449

Literature in Translation

3

ENG 472

Film, Gender, Sexuality

3

literature written before 1850 (6 credits)

two of the following*

ENG 240

World Literature to 400 CE

3

ENG 242

World Literature from 400–1600 CE

3

ENG 320

Topics in American Literature before 1870

3

ENG 340

The Bible as Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures

3

ENG 341

The Bible as Literature: The Christian Scriptures

3

ENG 344

Topics in British Literature Before 1850

3

ENG 355

Shakespeare in England

3

ENG 430

Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories

3

ENG 432

Shakespeare's Tragedies and Romances

3

literature written after 1850 (6 credits)

two of the following*

ENG 321

Topics in American Literature after 1870

3

ENG 327

Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

3

ENG 339

World Literature from 1900 to the Present

3

ENG 345

Topics in British Literature after 1850

3

ENG 407

Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

3

ENG 409

Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

3

*Other courses, such as special topics courses listed under "additional elective courses," may also be used to satisfy this requirement, depending on their focus. Topics courses can be repeated for credit when they have a different focus.

additional elective courses (6 credits)

Courses listed above under diversity, pre–1850 and post–1850 can also count as additional electives after students complete the required six credits in those categories.

two of the following

ENG 205

Researched–Based Writing

3

ENG 206

Critical Literacies and Community Writing

3

ENG 208

Written Inquiry: Composing Self

3

ENG 250

Introduction to Fiction

3

ENG 252

Introduction to Poetry

3

ENG 254

Introduction to Drama

3

ENG 271

Introduction to Linguistics

3

ENG 272

Reading Cinema

3

ENG 305

Business Writing

3

ENG 326

Topics in American Literature

3

ENG 329

Experimental Course

3

ENG 337

Topics in British Literature

3

ENG 346

Special Studies in Literature

1–6

ENG 347

Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

3

ENG 371

Discourse Analysis

3

ENG 372

Language and Ideology

3

ENG 373

Rhetorical Criticism

3

ENG 374

Environmental Rhetoric

3

ENG 375

Composing New Media

3

ENG 376

Academic Narratives

3

ENG 421

Humanities Computing

3

ENG 441

Topics in Drama

3

ENG 442

Topics in Poetry

3

ENG 443

Topics in Fiction

3

ENG 445

Major Author(s)

3

ENG 446

Topics in Rhetoric

3

ENG 456

Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism

3

ENG 462

Topics in Literature and Film

3

ENG 471

The Rhetoric of Fiction

3

ENG 481

Theory and Practice of Writing, Tutoring and Conferencing

3

ENG 484

Introduction to Digital Humanities

3

journalism area of study (30 credits)

Journalism prepares students for a career in the news media. Journalism students are encouraged to minor in history, American studies, foreign languages, music, religion, art history, peace studies, political science or theatre.

journalism core courses (15 credits)

ENG 215

Theory and Practice of Journalism

3

ENG 308

Public Affairs Reporting

3

ENG 410

Panther Workshop

3

ENG 414

Feature Writing

3

ENG 496

Research Methodologies for Senior Seminar in Journalism

3

journalism electives (12 credits)

four of the following (at least nine elective credits must be at the upper–division level)

ENG 211

Introduction to Digital Media Workshop

3

ENG 218

Introduction to Layout and Design

3

ENG 253

Photojournalism

3

ENG 317

Copy Editing

3

POSC 317

Media and Politics

3

ENG 319

Online Magazine Production

3

POSC 343

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties

3

ENG 411

Advanced Digital Media Workshop

3

ENG 415

Topics in Journalism

3

ENG 418

Advanced Layout and Design

3

ENG 453

Advanced Photojournalism

3

ENG 490

Independent Internship

3

ENG 492A

Seminar Internship–News Reporting

3

literature elective (3 credits)

One upper–division literature course

3

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

With its focus on the study of important works, this degree combines literature courses and writing workshops to explore students' talents as creative writers.

core creative writing courses (18 credits)

ENG 204

Introduction to Creative Writing

3

ENG 304

Advanced Creative Writing

3

ENG 403

Techniques in Poetry Writing or

3

ENG 404

Techniques in Writing Fiction

 

END 405*

Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing and/or

6

ENG 406*

Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction

 

ENG 497

Capstone Course in Creative Writing

3

*ENG 405 and 406 are repeatable for credit. Students must take a combination of ENG 405 and 406 for a total of six credits.

elective writing courses (12 credits)

four of the following

ENG 228

Introduction to Screenwriting

3

ENG 310

Writing Creative Nonfiction

3

ENG 312

Writing the Short Story

3

ENG 313

Writing Southern California

3

ENG 314

Writing the Novel

3

ENG 316

Writing Poetry

3

ENG 318

Intermediate Screenwriting

3

ENG 328

Writing for Video Games

3

ENG 405

Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing

3

ENG 406

Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction

3

ENG 414

Feature Writing

3

core literature and theory courses (15 credits)

requirements (9 credits)

ENG 223

Literature III (1800 CE–Present)

3

ENG 250

Introduction to Fiction or

3

ENG 252

Introduction to Poetry

 

ENG 256

Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

3

two of the following (6 credits)

ENG 221

Literature I (antiquity to 1400 CE)

3

ENG 222

Literature II (1400–1800 CE)

3

ENG 270

Foundations of Rhetorical Studies

3

elective literature courses (6 credits)

Two upper–division literature courses

6

total credits

 

51

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.F.A. in Creative Writing.

Minors in the Department of English

Minor in Digital Imaging and Design

A Minor in Digital Imaging and Design is for liberal arts students seeking exposure to multimedia journalism, digital and print photography, layout, design, videography and online editing. The program allows students to explore the practice, history and theory of design, photography, videography, editing and journalism and gives them the opportunity to test their skills by working with campus and professional news organizations. The minor is open to all students except students earning a B.A. in English or a B.F.A. in Creative Writing or a Minor in Journalism or a B.F.A. in Art or a B.F.A. in Graphic Design. 12 credits must be upper–division.

core requirements (15 credits)

ENG 210

Panther Workshop

3

ENG 411

Advanced Digital Media Workshop

3

ENG 418

Advanced Layout and Design

3

ENG 453

Advanced Photojournalism

3

ENG 498B

Senior Seminar Journalism

3

elective courses (9 credits)

ENG 319

Online Magazine Production

3

ART 321

Topics in Photography (documentary)

3

ART 322

Photography and Contemporary Art

3

ART 323

Digital Photography

3

ART 335

Web and Interaction Design

3

ENG 410

Panther Workshop (Photo Editor, Web Editor or Design Editor)

3

ART 435

Advanced Interaction and Web Design

3

ENG 490

Independent Internship

3

total credits

 

24

Minor in English

A Minor in English requires a total of 18 credits in English at or above the 200–level with at least nine credits must be upper–division. Students who wish to design a minor in a particular area of interest should speak with an advisor in the Department of English.

Minor in Journalism

A Minor in Journalism requires a total of 21 credits in English above ENG 103 with at least 12 upper–division credits.

core requirements (15 credits)

ENG 210

Panther Workshop

3

ENG 215

Theory and Practice of Journalism

3

ENG 308

Public Affairs Reporting

3

ENG 496

Research Methodologies for Senior Seminar in Journalism

3

ENG 498B

Senior Seminar Journalism

3

elective courses (6 credits)

ENG 211

Introduction to Digital Media Workshop

3

ENG 218

Introduction to Layout and Design

3

ENG 253

Photojournalism

3

ENG 317

Copy Editing

3

ENG 319

Online Magazine Production

3

ENG 410

Panther Workshop

3

ENG 411

Advanced Digital Media Workshop

3

ENG 414

Feature Writing

3

ENG 415

Topics in Journalism

3

ENG 418

Advanced Layout and Design

3

ENG 490

Independent Internship

1–3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Writing and Rhetoric

In the Minor in Writing and Rhetoric, students explore why and how people create texts. The required courses provide students with a foundational understanding of the field of rhetorical studies. Electives enable students to study a variety of methodological approaches to the study of language and writing and to gain expertise in rhetorical analysis and the production of complex texts. The minor requires a total of 21 credits, 15 of which must be upper–division.

core requirements (6 credits)

ENG 270

Foundations of Rhetorical Studies

3

ENG 446

Topics in Rhetoric

3

elective courses (15 credits) 12 credits must be upper–division

ENG 205

Research–Based Writing

3

ENG 206

Critical Literacies and Community Writing

3

ENG 208

Written Inquiry: Composing Self

3

ENG 271

Introduction to Linguistics

3

ENG 302

Writing About Diverse Cultures

3

ENG 305

Business Writing

3

ENG 371

Discourse Analysis

3

ENG 372

Language and Ideology

3

ENG 373

Rhetorical Criticism

3

ENG 374

Environmental Rhetoric

3

ENG 375

Composing New Media

3

ENG 376

Academic Narratives

3

ENG 471

The Rhetoric of Fiction

3

ENG 472

Film, Gender, Sexuality

3

ENG 481

Theory and Practice of Writing, Tutoring and Conferencing

3

total credits

 

21

Department of English Graduate Degrees

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in English program provides quality instruction and personal guidance from experienced, nationally–known scholars and creative writers. The master's degree offers the academic credentials necessary for community college teaching and preparation for doctoral study as well as a rich background for teachers and professionals at all levels. (See the graduate catalog for more details.)

Master of Fine Arts

The Department of English offers the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. The M.F.A. is a terminal degree and qualifies the holder to teach at the college and university level. (See the graduate catalog for more details.)

Course Descriptions – English

ENG 103 Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing

Writing seminar devoted to rhetorical understanding and competence in a variety of specific academic contexts. Students may choose their area of concentration from a range of writing genres, each with its own sets of expectations, forms and purposes. Attention will focus on student writing in differing discourse communities, but all sections of English 103 address rhetorical effectiveness in composition. Students may select from courses that foreground Writing in Electronic Environments, for example, or Writing about Literature, Composing the Self, Writing in Academic Environments among many other options. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ENG 200 Introduction to Literary Studies

This course helps students write for a variety of purposes across genres of literary studies, including the research essay and theoretical analysis. Exploration of approaches to teaching and valuing academic writing encourages students to think critically about writing in the field. Particular emphasis is given to the rhetorical challenges in generating knowledge from literary texts. This course is recommended for those intending to major in English. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 203 Humanities Computing

An introductory course in digital humanities that blends theory and practice in computing for humanities disciplines. Students explore the current state of digital humanities research, the history and future of games, the rise and current iterations of new media, and fundamental principles of computing. This course is appropriate for all majors and minors, especially those in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 204 Introduction to Creative Writing

Instructors introduce students to the art of writing fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and/or drama. Students may publish their works in Elephant Tree, Chapman's creative writing journal. Some sections of this course may be restricted to creative writing majors/minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 205 Research-Based Writing

Provides students with intensive experience in research-based academic writing. The course focuses on the shaping and presenting of reports, analyses, and arguments, with special attention to research methodologies, the nature of evidence and evidence use, style(s) and voice(s), audience issues, and document design. Includes the study of essential elements of rhetorical theory; experience with historical, ethnographic, and empirical research methods; and use of text–based and multimodal written forms, including essays, reports, narrative, and visual/electronic text. This course is appropriate for all majors, and no specialized writing experience is assumed. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 206 Critical Literacies and Community Writing

This course provides an opportunity to explore public discourse, to see how dominant cultural expressions shape members of communities as well as how individuals and groups shape cultural messages. Students will critically observe and analyze public texts and events. The course is based upon the idea that bringing the “texts” in their lives to attention as material for reflection and deliberation provides students an opportunity to identify the rhetorical patterns used to enact community aims and to empower students to develop a voice in this public forum. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 208 Written Inquiry: Composing Self

In English 208 students explore the relationship between identity and writing. Students will study a variety of genres (personal essays, researched essays, academic articles, news reports, case studies, and ethnographies) and theoretical approaches to learn how and why writers create versions of themselves for rhetorical effect. While investigating identity construction in writing, students will hone their own rhetorical and stylistic skills. Students will compose narratives, essays, reports, and multi-genre compositions, drawing from personal experience, observation, and primary and secondary sources. The course will also address the role of self in the research-writing process by requiring students to conduct original academic research projects. This course is appropriate for all majors, and no specialized writing experience is assumed. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 210 Panther Workshop

Prerequisite, ENG 215, or corequisite with consent of instructor. Students join the staff of Chapman's newspaper to report and write weekly stories. Training includes critical thinking, setting goals and responsibilities, making ethical and political decisions, and meeting deadlines. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 211 Introduction to Digital Media Workshop

This course will introduce students to the fast-paced world of online media. Students will explore the essential elements of online journalism, including news judgment, ethics of online reporting, blogging, web design, photography, and video. The course will include a strong workshop component, and students will produce the online version of The Panther newspaper, while gaining a working knowledge of programs like Adobe Photoshop and iMovie. In addition, students will learn the strategies behind a good social media campaign, and will be responsible for publicizing breaking news stories and features on a daily basis. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 215 Theory and Practice of Journalism

Students study and practice news gathering and reporting, emphasizing the development of writing skills. Assignments include finding news sources, using interviewing techniques, and writing acceptable news copy, feature stories, editorials, critical reviews, and personal interviews. The history, philosophy, ethics, and major criticism of the news media are covered. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 215L Reporting Lab

Corequisite, ENG 215. This course is an optional writing lab that supports ENG 215. The lab gives students additional guidance from the instructor to focus on the critical thinking process necessary to efficiently and accurately report and write for publication. Students will have opportunities for one-on-one instruction. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

ENG 218 Introduction to Layout and Design

Prerequisite, ENG 215. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of design in newspaper, magazine and digital journalism, and public relations newsletters and logos. Students examine the aesthetic components that create newspaper and magazine formulae: components of design, types of layout, photography and art, typography, and production stages. Students explore the subtleties of typography and layout from the simplest one-column layout to complex grids and free-form typography. Students are required to contribute to the design of The Panther newspaper or any other campus or community publication. This course is also an introduction to graphic design as a production tool. Course includes instruction in the discipline of graphic design and in Macintosh Adobe computer skills such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 221 Literature I (antiquity to 1400 CE)

A survey of literatures written prior to 1400 CE. The course focuses on western literatures but may attend to other traditions as well. Content varies by semester, but readings typically include examples or excerpts of the following: the Bible, Greek tragedy, Greek or Roman epic, Metamorphoses, Beowulf, chivalric romance, Canterbury Tales, Petrarch, Commedia. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 222 Literature II (1400-1800 CE)

A survey of literatures written between 1400-1800 CE. The course focuses on Anglophone literatures but may attend to other traditions as well. Content varies by semester, but readings typically include examples or excerpts of the following: lyric poetry, stageplay, essay (e.g., Montaigne, Bacon, Johnson, Addison), Don Quixote, Paradise Lost, satire, novel/novella, Romanticism. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 223 Literature III (1800 CE-present)

A survey of literatures written from 1800 CE to the present. The course focuses on Anglophone literatures but may attend to other traditions as well. Content varies by semester, but readings typically include examples or excerpts of the following: romanticism, realism, slave narratives, naturalism, modernism and postmodernism. The course situates texts within their historical contexts, exploring how literary texts participated in the upheavals of Civil and World Wars, colonialism and post-colonialism, and the emergence of global modernity/postmodernity. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 228 Introduction to Screenwriting

Prerequisite, admission to the undergraduate program in Creative Writing. Students discuss, criticize, and evaluate the techniques of commercial, feature screenwriting (the screenwriting workshop) at the introductory level in order to produce a potentially marketable work. (Offered alternate semesters.) 3 credits.

ENG 229 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 240 World Literature to 400 CE

Students will study major works of early literature from both Western and non-Western traditions. Representative texts might range from Gilgamesh to Greek drama to the Bhagavad Gita and the poetry of T'ao Ch'ien. Western texts will not duplicate those read in ENG 236. This course can be used to satisfy either the diversity or the pre-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 242 World Literature from 400 - 1600 CE

This course will feature non-Anglophone literary texts from Western and non-Western traditions. Representative texts might include works of the European Middle Ages and Renaissance not covered in ENG 236, as well as T 'ang poetry, and selections from The Tale of Genji and Rumi's poetry. This course can be used to satisfy either the diversity or the pre--1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 244 World Literature from 1600 - 1900 CE

Students read chosen works of non-Anglophone literature from 1600 to 1900. Emphasis may vary to focus on the relationship of literature to other arts and cultures. Authors may include Moliere, Sor Juana, Mme de Lafayette, Voltaire, Cao Xueqin, Basho, Rousseau, Goethe, Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, and Ibsen. This course can be used to satisfy the diversity distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 250 Introduction to Fiction

Students read and analyze selected short stories and novels in conjunction with critical commentary chosen to represent a wide range of theoretical viewpoints. Authors studied vary each semester, but might include Hawthorne, Melville, Gogol, Maupassant, Chopin, Austen, Hemingway, Carver, O'Conner, Atwood, and Morrison. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 252 Introduction to Poetry

This course on the history of modern poetry (from 1800 to the present) studies, among other subjects, the many variations of poetic form, subjectivity and language, and the function of poetry in society. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 253 Photojournalism

This class will cover principles of photojournalism, ethics, and visual newsgathering with an emphasis on accuracy and conduct. Caption writing, basic newsgathering, and image photo editing will be discussed. Digital darkroom, scanning, and workflow will be discussed. Must have access to 35mm camera. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

ENG 254 Introduction to Drama

By reading plays from ancient to modern times, including comedy, tragedy, and the variant literary forms that lie between, students learn the history and structuring principles of drama. Modern playwrights may include Puig, Mamet, Hwang, Wilson, and Wasserstein. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 256 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

Prerequisite, written inquiry. This course examines the major trends, theories, interpretative methodologies, and techniques of literary criticism and cultural studies. ENG 256 is the gateway course for the literature emphasis in the English major. It must be taken prior to or concurrent with all 300- or 400-level literature courses. (Concurrent enrollment requires permission of advisor.) (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 260 Literature into Film

This course examines how selected works of written literature are translated into films. Discussions will focus on the difference imposed by the printed word and cinema in shaping the same material into two different artistic expressions. The course will investigate the adaptation of literary works such as Shakespeare’s Othello, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, and Hammett’s Maltese Falcon or King’s “The Body.” Designed for non-majors, ENG 260 does not count toward the English major. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 270 Foundations of Rhetorical Studies

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Designed as a gateway to all upper-division rhetoric offerings, this course will familiarize students with major themes and epistemologies in the history of Rhetoric. Beginning with the pre-Socratics and ending with post-modernism, students will explore the theoretical shifts and major figures that define a modern study of Rhetoric. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 271 Introduction to Linguistics

Through an introduction to the major characteristics and components of human language, students become familiar with the power and complexity of language, the way it influences our interaction with other people, and its potential contribution to understanding ourselves and society. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 272 Reading Cinema

This course examines how cinema is read within a range of contexts. These contexts may include the cultural, aesthetic, historical, and/or interdisciplinary. Conceptual issues that may be covered include national identity, gender and sexuality, power, and spectatorship. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 290 Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Internships in the English Department are offered with the cooperation of various organizations. Interns employ critical reading, writing, and research skills and acquire significant work experience related to the English major. Students may learn new skills and explore career opportunities. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

ENG 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 299 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 302 Writing About Diverse Cultures

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Exploring post-colonial rhetorics, this class sharpens writing skills through the study of writers from diverse and non-Western cultures. Major emphasis, however, is on student writing in response to “other voices.” (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 304 Advanced Creative Writing

Prerequisite, ENG 204. More specialized than introductory creative writing, this course focuses on single genres: fiction, poetry, or drama. Students are encouraged to submit their work to Elephant Tree Chapman's creative writing journal, and prepare a portfolio of their work to send to agents and publishers. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 305 Business Writing

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Students write in a variety of professional forms, for a variety of purposes. Operating platform for this course is the Chapman Professional Mentoring Program, which students administer and maintain. Course may also include community outreach projects in which students work with local non-profit groups. A significant portion of this course will be conducted electronically, to mirror current realities. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 308 Public Affairs Reporting

Prerequisites, ENG 210, 215. Emphasizing public affairs reporting, this is an advanced research course designed to teach students to write for broadcast, print and online publications while exploring what it means to be a citizen on various levels: municipal, county, state and federal. Skills developed include gathering information, obtaining public documents, writing concisely with clarity and precision, interviewing, editing and critical thinking about the media's role in a democracy. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 309 Theories of the Short Story

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Students examine the stylistic and formal elements of the short story/novella. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 310 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite, ENG 204, or 208. Students examine the stylistic and formal elements of creative nonfiction, which might include literary journalism, autobiography, memoir, and personal essays. Students write their own creative nonfiction, which the professor and fellow students critique in a workshop. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 311 Introduction to Sitcom Writing

Prerequisite, ENG 204. An introductory workshop devoted to writing the 30-minute sitcom in which students learn how to write a spec script for a TV show that is currently on the air by studying both older and newer sitcoms. Students learn how to brainstorm story ideas, structure an outline and write scenes with dialogue concluding in a polished draft. Additional course work includes weekly examinations and analysis of teleplays and television series; with an emphasis on the role of the writer in the medium. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 312 Writing the Short Story

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students examine the stylistic and formal elements of the short story. Students write short stories which the professor and fellow students critique in a workshop. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 313 Writing Southern California

Prerequisite, ENG 204, or 310. A nonfiction writing workshop in which students read classics of fiction and nonfiction set in Southern California and write about the region from their own experiences with the land and its people. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 314 Writing the Novel

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students examine the stylistic and formal elements of the novel and work on their own novel which the professor and fellow students critique in a workshop. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 316 Writing Poetry

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students examine the history, stylistic and formal elements, and theories of poetry. They write poems which they bring into class for critique by the professor and fellow students in a workshop setting. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 317 Copy Editing

Prerequisite, ENG 215, or equivalent. Students gain experience and direction in developing efficient copy editing skills for digital, print and magazine journalism. Students practice meeting professional standards in such areas as photo editing, writing captions and cutlines, fundamentals of design and editing, broadcast news, and features. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 318 Intermediate Screenwriting

Prerequisite, ENG 228. Students discuss, criticize, evaluate and study the techniques of commercial, feature screenwriting with emphasis on such elements as plotting, character, dialogue and formatting. The course will be arranged both as a seminar and a workshop. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 319 Online Magazine Production

Prerequisites, ENG 210, 215, or consent of instructor. In this study of the organization, layout, writing, and production of magazines, students examine editorial administration, special interest magazines, design and layout, magazine formula, editing and typography, advertising and writing. Students will create their own magazine as well as assist with a campus magazine or journal. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 320 Topics in American Literature before 1870

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course encourages in-depth study of the literature and culture of the U.S. before 1870. ENG 320 employs a topical or thematic approach, focusing on a particular theme, writer, genre, and/or group of writers. Possible foci include the literature of the American Renaissance, the Civil War, or the rise of the 19th-century American woman writer. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. ENG 320 may be repeated for credit with a different emphasis. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 321 Topics in American Literature after 1870

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course encourages in-depth study of the literature and culture of the U.S. after 1870. ENG 321 employs a topical or thematic approach, focusing on a particular theme, writer, genre, and/or group of writers. Possible foci include American realism, the literature of the Gilded Age, literature of WWI and WWII, the emergence of Modernism and Postmodernism. This course can be used to satisfy the post-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. ENG 321 may be repeated for credit with a different emphasis. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 323 Journalists as Historians

(Same as HIST 323.) Prerequisites, ENG 215, or HIST 296, and English, or history major, or minor. Students read, discuss, and critique works of historical nonfiction by journalists, and prepare their own magazine-length article on a historical event. This course will expose students to how journalists work then they cross the boundary into history, note the overlaps in technique, and how to tease narratives from myriad details. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 325 Introduction to Shakespeare

This course provides a general introduction to Shakespeare by considering representative tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances. ENG 325 aims to increase students' knowledge of Shakespeare's plays by considering the historical, literary, and cultural contexts of their creation and performance. This course also helps students understand and apply contemporary approaches in the field of Shakespeare studies. ENG 325 does not fulfill elective requirements for English majors in the Literature area of study. Majors in the Literature area of study should take ENG 430, or 432. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 326 Topics in American Literature

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Examining significant themes in American literature. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy a distribution requirement for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 327 Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Examining alienation, assimilation, oppression, ethnic pride, and the twin searches for meaning and an authentic voice in minority literature in America, this course might focus on African–American, Asian–American, or Chicano/Latino literature. This course can be used to satisfy the diversity distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 328 Writing for Video Games

This course will focus intensively on the possibilities of narrative in an interactive, choice-based environment. It will question how branching narrative bears a resemblance to traditional, linear methods, while challenging students to take the very best from what has come before in order to create something new and rich, but no less affecting. It will utilize critical theory in order to enhance understanding of how games exist and why, before utilizing examples of interactive narratives to show students how they work and how they can be improved. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 329 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 332 Topics in Early Modern Literature

Prerequisite, ENG 256, or HIST 308. This course encourages in-depth study of the literature and culture of the early modern period (ca. 1500-1700). ENG 332 employs a topical or thematic approach, focusing on a particular theme, writer, genre, and/or group of writers. Possible foci include early modern epic, non-Shakespearean Renaissance drama, early modern women writers, and sex/gender in the Renaissance. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. ENG 332 may be repeated for credit with a different emphasis. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 337 Topics in British Literature

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course examines significant themes, genres, or movements in British literature. Possible courses include postcolonial literature, literature of war, and British women writers. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 339 World Literature from 1900 to the Present

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Students read chosen works of non-Anglophone literature from 1900 to the present. Emphasis may vary to focus on the relationship of literature to other arts and cultures. Authors may include Achebe, Akhmatova, Beckett, Bely, Borges, Calvino, Césaire, Kafka, Kawabata, Lispector, Lorca, Lu, Mahfouz, Marquez, Pirandello, Proust, Queneau, Rilke, Rulfo. This course can be used to satisfy either the diversity or the post-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 340 The Bible as Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures

(Same as REL 340.)

ENG 341 The Bible as Literature: The Christian Scriptures

(Same as REL 341.)

ENG 344 Topics in British Literature before 1850

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course encourages in-depth study of British literature and culture before 1850. ENG 344 employs a topical or thematic approach, focusing on a particular theme, writer, genre, and/or group of writers. Possible foci might include: monsters and magic in medieval literature, early modern epic, 18th century women writers, or sex/gender in pre-modern England. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. ENG 344 may be repeated for credit with a different emphasis. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 345 Topics in British Literature after 1850

Prerequisite, ENG 256, or HIST 313. This course encourages in-depth study of the literature and culture of Britain after 1850. ENG 345 employs a topical or thematic approach, focusing on a particular theme, writer, genre, and/or group of writers. Possible foci include the Gothic novel, literature of WWI and WWII, James Joyce's Ulysses, or postcolonial fiction. This course can be used to satisfy the post-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. ENG 345 may be repeated for credit with a different emphasis. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 346 Special Studies in Literature

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course is concentrated on one area, such as literature of exile, law and literature, or Canadian literature. Credit may be arranged to travel in a foreign country while studying the literature of that country. The course may be designed to meet individual student interests. The London Theatre Tour and Literary London are offered as sections of ENG 346. Dependent on its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ENG 347 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

(Same as SOC 347.) Prerequisite, ENG 256. In this course, students investigate significant themes or movements in literature and culture. Topics vary; dependent on its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 355 Shakespeare in England

This London-based travel course focuses on several of Shakespeare's works in print and in contemporary performance. Students will read, watch, and analyze between 8 and 12 plays while exploring the rich and vibrant city in which they were written and first enacted. Plays and venues vary, but often include productions at Shakespeare's Globe and at the National Theatre, as well as productions at Stratford-upon-Avon by the Royal Shakespeare Company. (Offered summer, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 359 Elie Wiesel: Life and Works

(Same as HIST 359, REL 359.)

ENG 370 Technical Writing

Prerequisite, written inquiry course. This course will explore principles and procedures of technical writing with attention to rhetorical strategies, document design, usability, style, and editing. These principles and procedures will be applied to the basic genres of research-based scientific and technical writing, including the report, proposal, manual, resume and/or professional correspondence for business, industry, and technology. Appropriate for all majors. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 371 Discourse Analysis

This course is an introduction to the contemporary study of discourse analysis as a way to explore a broad range of social practices embodied in language. It provides an opportunity to work with specific techniques of discourse analysis, studying how social relations, identities, and knowledge are constructed through language. The course will prepare students to use language “tools of inquiry” in their research in the humanities. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 372 Language and Ideology

A detailed examination of political rhetoric, how groups (in may different configurations) of people are persuaded to accept, support and even defend specific ideological formulations. Students will explore notions of "ideological literacy," "hegemonic discourse" and "the political unconscious" as they relate to social movements, grand narratives and material existence. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 373 Rhetorical Criticism

Prerequisite, written inquiry course. This course studies the purpose of rhetorical criticism, particularly as a practice of both critical inquiry and social agency. Students will examine multiple fields of public discourse, focusing on the rhetoric of social and political movements in the digital age. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 374 Environmental Rhetoric

This course studies the rhetoric of the heterogeneous environmental movement. The questions guiding this course are about knowledge—how it is constructed, framed, and instrumentalized in environmental discourse. Fields of discourse we might analyze include global warming, biodiversity, environmental justice, conservation and wilderness, toxicity and health, and sustainability. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 375 Composing New Media

This course studies how and why we compose in new media. Students will explore the move from print to online publishing; the rhetorical effects, complexities, and problems of this online setting; and the rhetorical choices they must make in their own online texts. Students will study and compose in different new media platforms, which may include blogs and other hypertexts. They will also investigate how the rhetoric of these venues creates new situations and opportunities for academic, journalistic, and political writing in the evolving public sphere. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 376 Academic Narratives

An advanced academic writing course focusing on complex, multilayered, rhetorically informed narrative compositions. Using the method of narrative inquiry, students develop academic narratives that explore a chosen topic, revising over time to incorporate varied forms of evidence and genres. The course emphasis is on rhetorical control of a range of academic narrative forms and discursive styles, with intensive work on stylistics and the discourse conventions of the student’s major, minor, and/or intended professional fields. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 399 Independent Study and Research

Prerequisite, written inquiry, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ENG 403 Techniques in Poetry Writing

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Using lectures and workshops, students learn, practice, and analyze the basic techniques necessary to write and revise poetry and to understand their options as members of the larger community of poets. Techniques of poetry may include sound, voice, imagery, metaphor, narrative, traditional forms, and writing processes. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 404 Techniques in Writing Fiction

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Through lectures and workshops, students practice producing publishable fiction or poetry. Techniques of fiction may include plot development, viewpoint selection, three–dimensional characterization, dialogue, scene and summary settings, and theme. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 405 Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students discuss, critique, and revise individual poems in order to produce work suitable for submission to a literary journal. Students examine the conventions of various forms, poetry movements, and/or individual poets to determine the areas within which they choose to work. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 406 Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students discuss, criticize, and evaluate novel chapters or short stories in order to produce publishable work. Students work within their chosen genre and form, and the guidelines of various genres and forms are examined. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 407 Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Literary Forum studies four contemporary poets and their work in conjunction with a lecture and reading series sponsored by Tabula Poetica: Poetry at Chapman University. Lectures and readings are conducted by poets held every year during the fall semester, and the course reading, analysis, and writing assignments are based on the visiting writers' works. In addition, students enrolled in this course present a poetry reading and/or lecture. This course will focus not only on the series' writers, but on contemporary poetry in general, incorporating work beyond American when appropriate. This course may be used to satisfy the post-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 409 Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Literary Forum studies six contemporary authors and their work in conjunction with a lecture and reading series sponsored by the John Fowles Center for Creative Writing. Lectures and/or readings conducted by novelists, poets, critics, screenwriters, and creative non–fiction writers held every year during the spring semester and the reading and analysis assignments are based on the visiting writers' works. This course will focus not only on the series' writers, but on contemporary writing in general both in the Americas and in Europe. This course can be used to satisfy the post-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 410 Panther Workshop

Prerequisite, ENG 210, Panther editors only, or consent of instructor. For editors and senior writers working on the university's weekly newspaper and online publication. In addition to mastering skills learned in ENG 210, ENG 410 students will master editing, management, layout and design, photography and digital journalism. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 411 Advanced Digital Media Workshop

Prerequisite, ENG 210, or 211. This is an advanced journalism course for students interested in leveraging interactive media to create more comprehensive news coverage. Students will examine the rapid changes in new media, and learn how to utilize online tools that can help improve communication between journalists and consumers. The course will put emphasis on video production, basic web coding, social media and web design. Students will be responsible for regularly publishing the online version Chapman’s The Panther newspaper, and will create special online-only features that will supplement major news and feature stories. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 414 Feature Writing

Prerequisites, written inquiry, ENG 215. This course teaches feature writing with an emphasis on the extended feature article and personality profile. Assignments may also include advanced practice in writing editorials, critical reviews, humor, columns, and advertising copy. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 415 Topics in Journalism

Prerequisites, ENG 210, 215, or consent of instructor. Designed for the student interested in contemporary journalism and the role journalism plays in the world or specific areas. Sample topics might include: Current Trends In Journalism, The Foreign Press Today, Journalism and the Business World, Minorities and the Press, Contemporary Newspaper Literature, Reporting Public Affairs. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 418 Advanced Layout and Design

Prerequisite, ENG 218. This course introduces the student to the conceptual aspects of the formal language of the visual arts by analyzing the ever changing relationship between words and images. This course will challenge students to think critically, socially, politically and historically in design practice, writing and professional preparation. Study includes an emphasis in packaging design and editorial typography. This course integrates visual strategies, research methods, typography and theory in media design. Students are again required to design for The Panther newspaper or any other campus or community publication. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 419 Advanced Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite, ENG 204. Students discuss, criticize and evaluate nonfiction essays in order to produce publishable work. Students work within their chosen genre and form, and the guidelines of various genres are examined. (Offered ever semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 421 Humanities Computing

An introductory course in digital humanities that blends theory and practice in computing for humanities disciplines. Students explore the current state of digital humanities research, the history and future of games, the rise and current iterations of new media, and fundamental principles of computing. This course is appropriate for all majors and minors, especially those in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 425 Professional ESL

Advanced instruction in English as a second language. Students will review representative examples of academic and professional writing, and complete assignments designed to assist students in modeling such writing. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 429 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 430 Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories

Prerequisite, ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210. Advanced study of approximately 10 of Shakespeare's comedies and histories with attention to their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirements for English majors. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 432 Shakespeare's Tragedies and Romances

Prerequisite, ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210. Advanced study of approximately 10 of Shakespeare's tragedies and romances with attention to their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 441 Topics in Drama

Prerequisite, ENG 256. An opportunity for in-depth study, this course may focus on a single theme, historical period, or group of writers. Possible topics include the revenge tragedy, Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare), the theater of the absurd, and contemporary drama. Some sections include attendance of plays on or off campus. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 442 Topics in Poetry

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course may concentrate on one or more poets, poetic movements, or periods. It may include a comparative approach to either a group of national poetries or at least two national or shared-language poetries. Dependent upon is focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 443 Topics in Fiction

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Students study short stories, novels, and novellas from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and/or North America. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 445 Major Author(s)

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Students concentrate on the writings of either one significant author or a group of authors who can be profitably studied together. Examples of major figures include, but are not limited to, Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Keats, Dickens, Hawthorne, Melville, Pound, Eliot, Woolf, Joyce, Proust, Kazantzakis, and Faulkner. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 446 Topics in Rhetoric

Prerequisite, written inquiry. An opportunity for in-depth study, this course may focus on a single theme, historical period, or group of rhetoricians. Possible topics include Early Rhetoric (Greek, Roman, early Christian, medieval and scholastic); History of Rhetoric from the English Renaissance to today; the Rhetoric of the American Slavery Debate, History of Women Rhetoricians, the Rhetoric of Technology. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis. Dependent upon its emphasis, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 447 Topics in Comparative Literature

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Other prerequisites vary according to topic. See instructor or syllabus. This course analyzes key themes, motifs, and principles which integrate philosophy, psychology, politics, sociology or the history of ideas with literature. Recent themes have included Poetics of the Novel; Writers Writing from the Margin, Women in Love and Other Emotional States; Poetry or Prose? This course can be used to satisfy the diversity distribution requirement for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 449 Literature in Translation

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Readings in English translations of literary works from one foreign language such as Spanish, French, Russian, German, Italian, or Japanese. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. This course can be used to satisfy the diversity distribution requirement for English majors. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 453 Advanced Photojournalism

Prerequisite, ENG 253, or consent of instructor. This class will cover advanced principles of photojournalism, ethics, and visual newsgathering with an emphasis on accuracy, caption writing, basic newsgathering, image photo editing, digital darkroom, scanning and workflow. Students will learn to translate the 5w’s of journalism into visuals—showing what, who, where, when and why with the camera with introductions to strobe photography for both portrait and studio. Must have access to 35mm camera. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 456 Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism

Prerequisite, ENG 256. This course allows for the intensive study of significant movements in or theoretical approaches to literary and cultural studies. Possible topics include literary criticism to 1900, feminist theory, and poststructuralism. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 462 Topics in Literature and Film

Prerequisite, ENG 256. Depending on the instructor, this course could focus on the emerging nations of Africa, the Middle East, or Central or South America. Writers and filmmakers that might be studied include Chinua Achebe, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Ousmane Sembene, Peter Weir, or Satyajet Ray. Dependent upon its focus, this course might be used to satisfy one of the distribution requirements for English majors. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 471 The Rhetoric of Fiction

Prerequisite, 7WI course. Although focused on literary production, this course will confine that focus to rhetorical effects of authorial decisions about form, genre and style. The course will engage students in a brief overview of the historical relationships between literary and rhetorical theory (including major critical frames) in order to see where and how rhetorical analyses can provide competing or “completing” interpretations. Subject matter will range from ancient epic to graphic novel. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 472 Film, Gender, Sexuality

Prerequisite, written inquiry. This course examines the relationship between film, gender, and sexuality. Topics covered may include: cinematic representations of gender and sexuality; GLBT issues in film; feminist film theory; censorship; transgression; screening the body; psychoanalysis and cinema. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 481 Theory and Practice of Writing, Tutoring, and Conferencing

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Designed for students interested in working at the Writing Center or in teaching writing, English 481 focuses on responding to writing and on tutoring writers. Topics include tutoring strategies, the writing process, writing across the curriculum, and grammar as a rhetorical issue. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 484 Introduction to Digital Humanities

This upper-division course will familiarize students with emerging technologies for text-based inquiry, research and expression. In addition to gaining an overview of the digital humanities, students will apply what they learn to the design of their own digital project. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisites, written inquiry, consent of instructor. Students gain experience in the fields of business, industry, or academe. Work assignments relate to the major and may take place in law, editing, and business offices, print production and retail firms, newspapers, libraries, schools, or brokerage companies. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

ENG 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 492 Seminar Internship

Prerequisite, written inquiry. Students gain experience in the fields of business, industry, or academe. Word assignments relate to the major and may take place in law, editing, and business offices, print production and retail firms, newspapers, libraries, schools or brokerage companies. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENG 492A Seminar Internship - News Reporting

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students will learn critical thinking, writing and reporting skills necessary to work for a professional news organization both online and in print. By the end of the semester, each student will have a portfolio of published work. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 496 Research Methodologies for Senior Seminar in Journalism

Prerequisite, ENG 308, or consent of instructor. Students will learn methods for undertaking original research to develop a thesis topic and launch a senior project suitable for publication. Topics may include statistical analysis, public records searches,database searches, geographic information system mapping, hypothesis-and story-based inquiry and advanced news-gathering and digital reporting techniques. May be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 497 Capstone Course in Creative Writing

Prerequisites, ENG 304, senior standing, or consent of instructor. This course is a capstone course for creative writing majors. The course will be devoted to reading, discussing and writing about literature as well as writing fiction. Class discussions will deal with theoretical aspects of writing and literature. Individual tutorials will answer questions, problems, and issues regarding the students' own writing. The course will include a discussion of publishing. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 498 Senior Seminar

Prerequisite, senior standing, or consent of instructor. A capstone course for English majors, ENG 498 is offered in two formats: one for literature majors and one for journalism majors. Literature majors will complete a substantial project relating to their major field of study. Journalism majors will develop advanced interviewing, researching, and writing skills for investigative articles and stories for print and broadcast media. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 498A Senior Seminar in Literature and Rhetoric

Prerequisites, senior standing. This seminar-style course will focus on a significant topic, historical period, interpretive problem, or theoretical issue in literature, rhetoric or cultural studies. Students will complete a substantial project relating to their major field of study. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 498B Senior Seminar Journalism

Prerequisites, ENG 308, 496. This seminar-style course will focus on a significant topic, historical period, interpretive problem, or theoretical issue in comparative literature, journalism, literature, and teaching preparation. Students will complete a substantial project relating to their major field of study. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, ENG 256, senior standing, consent of instructor. Directed reading and/or research designed to meet specific needs of superior upper–division students. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.