College of Educational Studies

Margaret Grogan, Ph.D., Dean

Ky Kugler, Ed.D., ATC, Senior Associate Dean

Kimbery White–Smith, Ed.D., Associate Dean of Educator Development

Dianne Ferguson, Ph.D., Director of Program Improvement and Accreditation

Dawn Hunter, Ph.D., Director of Doctoral Program in Education

Roxanne Greitz-Miller, Ed.D., Assistant Dean for Undergraduate and Dual Degree Programs in Education

Professors: Alters, Brady, Brown, Bryan, Cardinal, D. Ferguson, P. Ferguson, Hass, Hunter, Kugler, SooHoo;

Associate Professors: Busse, Colón–Muñiz, Curwen, Greitz–Miller, Howard, Kennedy, Maier, McNenny, Monzó, White–Smith, Wilson;

Assistant Professors: Allen, De Pedro, Dodd, Golden, Kang, Lambert, Lopez, McIntyre–Miller, Samura;

Instructor: Mitchell, Padulo.

Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Educational Studies

Credential Programs

Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction Program

Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction

Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology/Master of Arts in Educational Psychology and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology

Master of Arts in Leadership Development

Master of Arts in Special Education

Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential/Bilingual Emphasis Option)

Master of Arts in Teaching: Secondary Education (Preliminary Single Subject Teaching Credential)

Ph.D in Education

Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Educational Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Educational Studies (IES) provides a dynamic, liberal–arts curriculum for those students interested in inquiry and education as a source of transformation and liberation in a diverse society. The B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies embodies John Dewey's concept of education as a “freeing of individual capacity in a progressive growth directed to social aims.” Simply stated, this major provides students a unique opportunity to be actively involved in those elements that create a just democracy. The major challenges students to dedicate their intellectual and personal capacities in a demanding and rewarding profession that can make a positive difference in the lives of children, youth and adults.

Prospective students wishing to pursue a B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies must be officially accepted in to the program. Integrated educational studies majors must meet competitive program admission requirements beyond Chapman University application standards via a second application process. A program admission selection committee consisting of, at a minimum, two academic faculty members will review all applicants and determine final admission status. An applicant can petition another review if denied initial admission.

In a mobile, rapidly changing society, the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies program is designed to prepare students to pursue careers in schools as well as other community environments such as business, human services, the arts, universities and community colleges. The curriculum combines challenging coursework with guided experiences in schools and/or other educational settings. The major is organized to address five key roles that educators need to acquire: 1) leader and change agent, 2) ethically responsible decision–maker, 3) learner and scholar, 4) advocate for inclusive and supportive communities and 5) facilitator and collaborator. To foster this acquisition of learning, the student who majors in integrated educational studies will complete a lower–division core (six courses), an upper–division core (five courses) and five additional courses in an emphasis area, either teaching and learning in schools or teaching and learning in the community. Courses in the emphasis area are completed during upper–division study. Students additionally select a second major (double major) and/or minor(s) in order to further tailor their academic experience to their immediate post–graduate career choice or future study needs.

Students in the teaching and learning in the schools emphasis area must complete either a second major or two minors, to ensure strong subject matter competency. Subject areas chosen typically include mathematics, science, history, social science, English or other language, STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education or language and literacy. As a part of their emphasis coursework, students will select three courses that emphasize critical inquiry in the liberal arts area of natural science, quantitative and values and ethical inquiry. These courses are in addition to inquiry classes completed as General Education (GE) requirements. At least two of the five courses must be upper–division. All courses selected must have permission of a College of Educational Studies advisor.

Students in the teaching and learning in community emphasis area must complete a second major or one minor, in addition to their upper–division three–course sequence within the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies that gives them concentrated advanced study in one area within the community emphasis. The course sequences include arts and organizations, business, disability studies, English, health, higher education, leadership studies, recreational coaching or technology.

Throughout the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies program, students will develop a portfolio of signature assessments that documents their acquisition of specific learning outcomes that ensure the integrated educational studies student is making good progress through the major before moving on to the next stage. These signature assessments ensure that the graduates from the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies represent the faculty of the College of Educational Studies as successful educators of the future, helping students and the public alike achieve and learn.

All courses within the major must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a “C” or higher. Graduation with honors will be considered if a student has a cumulative GPA of 3.500 or higher. Due to the assigned observation and/or fieldwork component for many of the integrated educational studies courses, students may be required to provide additional documentation or certifications. All integrated educational studies students are required to read and sign specific information found in the integrated educational studies fieldwork clearance packet during their first integrated educational studies course.

lowerdivision common requirements (18 credits)

IES 101

Self and Identity

3

IES 102

Social Construction of Difference

3

IES 103

Philosophy of Helping

3

IES 204

Learning and Forgetting: Exploring Theories of Learning

3

IES 206

Schools in Society

3

one of the following

IES 205

Learning Across Boundaries: The Power of Cross Disciplinary Curricula

3

IES 207

The Pursuit of Happiness and Knowledge: Walt Disney and Charles Darwin

3

upperdivision common requirements (15 credits)

IES 301

Organizations, Ethics and Society

3

IES 302

Information, Communication and Management: Theoretical and Practical Issues

3

IES 303

Education Through Life Transitions

3

IES 405*

Inquiry, Evidence and Decision–Making

3

IES 492*

IES Senior Seminar Internship

3

* IES 405 should be taken the semester before IES 492

emphasis requirements (15 credits)

Complete all the requirements within one of the following emphases: teaching and learning in the schools or teaching and learning in the community.

15

total credits

 

48

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies.

teaching and learning in the schools emphasis–specific requirements (15 credits)

With consent of College of Educational Studies advisor, select 15 credits, six credits must be upper–division (300–400) level courses.

IES 412

Teaching Writing K–12

3

 

Natural Science Inquiry

3

 

Quantitative Inquiry

3

 

Values and Ethical Inquiry

3

Artistic Inquiry

one of the following

IES 316

Aesthetic Education: Philosophy and Practice

3

IES 326

Education Viewed through Feature Film and Television

3

teaching and learning in schools emphasisadditional second major or two minors requirement

In addition to the 48 credits for the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies, a student in the teaching and learning in schools emphasis must complete a second major or two minors. One minor can be an elective choice by the student or be completion of the Honors program; the other minor must be in one of the core subject areas such as mathematics, science, history, social science, English or other language. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the elementary school level are encouraged to complete the Minor in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education or the Minor in Language and Literacy for the core subject area requirement.

teaching and learning in the community emphasis–specific requirements (15 credits)

requirements (6 credits)

IES 314

Adult Learning: Theory, Practice, Experience and the Future

3

IES 315

Non–Governmental Organizations: Policy and Practice

3

one of the following course sequences (9 credits)

arts and organizations (9 credits)

IES 316

Aesthetic Education: Philosophy and Practice

3

Art elective

(chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor)

3

Art elective

(chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor)

3

business (9 credits)

MGMT 316

Management of Organizations

3

MKTG 305

Fundamentals of Marketing for Non–Majors

3

Business elective

(chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor)

3

disability studies (9 credits)

IES 317

Disability, Families and Society: Issues of Professional Policy and Support

3

IES 413

Current Issues in Disability Studies and Services

3

Disability studies elective

(upper–division, chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor)

3

English (9 credits)

one of the following

IES 112

Writing for Educators

3

ENG 327

Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

3

one of the following

ENG 270

Foundation of Rhetorical Studies

3

ENG 271

Introduction to Linguistics

3

one of the following

ENG 371

Discourse Analysis

3

ENG 372

Language and Ideology

3

health (9 credits)

KINE 260

Global Health

3

one of the following

KINE 160

Health Education

3

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

one of the following

FSN 339

Lifecycle and Clinical Nutrition

3

KINE 360

Eastern Concepts of Health and Healing

3

higher education (9 credits)

IES 415

College Student Development

3

IES 416

Higher Education and Society

3

one of the following

LEAD 475

Introduction to Student Affairs in Higher Education

3

IES/LEAD elective

IES/LEAD elective, chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor

3

leadership studies (9 credits)

elective

(Upper–division, chosen w/consent of College of Educational Studies advisor)

3

one of the following

LEAD 101

Introduction to Leadership: Principles and Practices

3

LEAD 301

Theory and Practice of Leadership

3

one of the following

LEAD 385

Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

3

KINE 386

Leadership in a Team Setting

3

recreational coaching (9 credits)

KINE 306

Introduction to Performance Training for Athletes

3

KINE 324

Theory of Coaching

3

KINE 386

Leadership in a Team Setting

3

technology (9 credits)

IES 448

Instructional Technology: Science and Mathematics

3

IES 449

Educating with Multiple Technologies

3

EDUC 451

Educational Applications of Technology

3

teaching and learning in the community emphasisadditional second major or minor(s) requirement

In addition to the 48 credits for the B.A. in Integrated Educational Studies, a student in the teaching and learning in the community emphasis must complete a second major and/or one or more minor(s) in any subject.

Credential Programs

Credentials Open to Chapman Undergraduates

Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

Preliminary Single Subject Teaching Credential

Special Education (Education Specialist) Credential

Please refer to the graduate catalog for specific requirements on all credential and graduate degrees in the College of Educational Studies. For admittance to a credential program as an undergraduate student you must complete the application process through the College of Educational Studies Office at (714) 997–6781.

Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

The Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential authorizes the holder to teach all subjects in a self–contained classroom, K–12, as well as preschool and adult education. It is the credential sought by those who wish to teach elementary school (K–6). To obtain a Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential, candidates must pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) and complete the Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential requirements.

Chapman also offers a Preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential, Spanish/English bilingual emphasis program. This emphasis is designed to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and field experiences necessary to teach in California's diverse bilingual school settings.

Preliminary Single Subject Teaching Credential

The Preliminary Single Subject Teaching Credential allows the holder to teach in a specific subject area. Candidates must pass the appropriate section of the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET) and complete the Preliminary Single Subject Teaching Credential requirements.

Special Education Credentials – Preliminary Specialist Instruction Credential Mild/Moderate Disabilities and Moderate/Severe Disabilities

Chapman University offers the Special Education Teaching Credentials in both the mild/moderate and the moderate/severe areas.

Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction Program

The Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (MACI) 3 + 2 program enables selected Chapman undergraduate students to earn a bachelor degree, California multiple or single subject (i.e., elementary or secondary) teaching credential and master degree within five years of full–time study. Students must apply to the program no later than the second semester of their sophomore year in order to complete all requirements within the five–year timeline. See the graduate catalog for specific program and admission requirements.

Minors in Educational Studies

Minor in Disability Studies

The interdisciplinary Minor in Disability Studies prepares students to work in disability–related professions or to integrate the concepts and experiences of people with disabilities into more general careers or academic professions. Admission to the minor requires approval from the coordinators of the minor. All courses in the Minor in Disability Studies must be taken for graded option and no grade lower than a "C–" may be earned for credit toward the minor.

A total of 21 credits are required for this minor. At least 12 credits must be upper–division (300–400 level) courses and at least six credits of the upper–division credits must be completed in residency. There are four required common courses (12 credits), plus an additional nine credits which must be chosen from the list of electives.

common requirements (12 credits)

IES 103

Philosophy of Helping

3

PCST 339

People with Disabilities in Politics and Society

3

IES 413

Current Issues in Disability Studies and Services

3

POSC 439

Disability and the Law

3

electives (9 credits)

at least three credits must be upper division

PCST 150

Introduction to Peace Studies

3

IES 317

Disability, Families and Society: Issues of Professional Policy and Support

3

PHIL 319

Philosophy of Women/Women of Color

3

HON 339

Body, Flesh, Subject

3

HIST 342

The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life and Death

3

POSC 354

Nonviolent Social Change

3

SOC 385

Medical Sociology

3

EDUC 399

Individual Study

1–6

HIST 399

Individual Study and Research

3

POSC 399

Individual Study and Research

3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Integrated Educational Studies

The Minor in Integrated Educational Studies (IES) is designed for students who want to gain general expertise in the theoretical, structural, psychological and sociocultural aspects of education both in formal settings, such as schools and informal settings at all stages of development (child–adolescent–adult). Students who intend to teach at the secondary level are encouraged to pursue the Minor in Secondary Education, which is specifically tailored to their preparation.

Up to six credits may be shared between the minor and GE Requirements and at least twelve credits of the minor must "stand alone" and cannot be shared. Twelve credits of this minor must be upper–division. All courses in the Minor in Integrated Educational Studies must be taken for graded option and no grade lower than a "C–" may be earned for credit toward the minor.

common requirements (6 credits)

IES 206

Schools in Society

3

IES 302

Information, Communication and Management: Theoretical and Practical Issues

3

one of the following (3 credits)

IES 101

Self and Identity

3

IES 102

Social Construction of Difference

3

IES 103

Philosophy of Helping

3

one of the following (3 credits)

IES 204

Learning and Forgetting: Exploring Theories of Learning

3

IES 205

Learning Across Boundaries: The Power of Cross Disciplinary Curricula

3

electives (9 credits)

any 300 or 400 level course open to minors*, chosen in consultation with advisor

9

total credits

 

21

*Enrollment in IES 405 and 492 is restricted to integrated educational studies majors.

Minor in Language and Literacy

The Minor in Language and Literacy prepares the candidate with specific content preparation necessary for a career that includes the teaching of English at the elementary or middle grades levels or intensive writing in English in a community education setting. Future high school English teachers who are integrated educational studies majors in the schools emphasis area are strongly encouraged to choose English as a second major or to choose English as their core content minor and language and literacy as their second required minor.

Up to six credits may be shared between the minor and GE requirements and at least twelve credits of the minor must "stand alone" and cannot be shared. Twelve credits of this minor must be upper–division. All courses in the Minor in Language and Literacy must be taken for graded option and no grade lower than a "C–" may be earned for credit toward the minor.

common requirements (15 credits)

IES 112

Writing for Educators

3

ENG 270

Foundations of Rhetorical Studies

3

IES 340

Children's Literature and Literacy

3

ENG 371

Discourse Analysis

3

IES 412

Teaching Writing K–12

3

electives (6 credits)

two of the following, at least three credits must be upper division

ENG 221

Literature I (antiquity to 1400 CE)

3

ENG 256

Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

3

ENG 271*

Introduction to Linguistics

3

ENG 302

Writing About Diverse Cultures, or

3

ENG 327

Multicultural Literatures in the U.S.

 

ENG 325

Introduction to Shakespeare

3

ENG 326

Topics in American Literature

3

total credits

 

21

*ENG 271 Introduction to Linguistics is strongly recommended for any student planning to seek a teaching credential in English.

Minor in Leadership Studies

The Minor in Leadership Studies at Chapman aspires to exemplify the College of Educational Studies mission of "Changing Education, Changing the World" and the University's historical commitment to “Building Character; Transforming Lives.” The program offers a unique opportunity for Chapman students to enhance their understanding and practice of leadership, emphasizing not only preparation for work, but education for life. Participants' leadership capacities are expanded by blending classroom learning and theory with experiential exercises, simulations, self–assessments, case studies, field trips and retreats. The Minor in Leadership Studies is a natural fit for students seeking a meaningful and practical complement to their chosen major while fulfilling selected General Education requirements. It is particularly appropriate for students motivated to make a positive difference in the world through their lives and work, students who share a desire to learn … to lead … to serve.

In alignment with the University's vision, mission and guiding principles and its general education goals, the program promotes four key learning outcomes: (1) an understanding of the theory and practice of leading as a way of serving and values–based leadership, (2) increased self–awareness (leading as a way of both being and doing), (3) how to leverage individual differences and unite around a common purpose to create high–performing teams and (4) critical thinking, ethical practice and social responsibility.

The deadlines for applying for admission to the leadership program are: September 15 (for fall admissions), February 15 (for spring admissions) and April 15 (for summer admissions). The application must be accompanied by a recommendation from a University mentor (e.g., faculty member, academic advisor, coach or campus administrator). Interested students may access the application and recommendation forms from the College of Educational Studies website at http://www.chapman.edu/ces/undergraduate/leadership.aspx. For more information contact the leadership studies program office at (714) 289–2073.

All students who wish to pursue a Minor in Leadership Studies, which culminates in a five–credit capstone (senior seminar + an applied service–leadership practicum), must fulfill the requirements listed below and remain in good academic standing. Unless approved by the leadership studies program director, all courses must be completed for a letter grade where the option exists and passed with a “C–” or higher. Students graduating with a GPA of 3.800 or above in the minor may be eligible for program honors and commendation. The program also honors those leadership minors who have made significant contributions to the University community during their time at Chapman with the Albert Schweitzer Spirit of Service Award. In addition, the annual Robert K. Greenleaf Award is bestowed on the student or students who, in the view of program faculty, have best exemplified the principles and practice of servant–leadership through service to the outside community.

core requirements

lowerdivision foundation (3 credits)

one of the following

LEAD 101

Introduction to Leadership: Principles and Practices

3

LEAD 301

Theory and Practice of Leadership

3

upperdivision core (7 credits)

requirements

LEAD 314

Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others

4

LEAD 414

Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work

3

ethical leadership/values in action application (3–4 credits)

leadership or leadership–related course

one of the following

IES 103

Philosophy of Helping

3

IES 300

Valuing Differences in American Society

3

SOC 300

Society, Organizations and Leadership

3

IES 301

Organizations, Ethics and Society

3

SOC 306

Social Movements

3

HIST 307

Germany and the Holocaust

3

NWD 307

Mass Media Law and Ethics

3

PHIL 314

Medical Ethics

3

LEAD 315

The Multi–Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity Issues in the Workplace

3

PHIL 315

Voluntary Service

3

PHIL 316

Business and Professional Ethics

3

IES 317

Disability, Families and Society: Issues of Professional Policy and Support

3

LEAD 320

Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion and Service

3

LEAD 385

Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

3

ANTH 361

Conflict and Social Change in Latin America

3

COM 440

Conflict, Negotiation and Power

3

LEAD 485

Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

4

COM 493

Ethical Controversies in Communication

3

leadership electives (3–4 credits)

one of the following (not limited to the following courses)

IES 101

Self and Identity

3

IES 103

Philosophy of Helping

3

PCST 253/453

Mediation and Conflict Resolution

3

HIST 270

Creating Leadership in African History

3

LEAD 301

Theory and Practice of Leadership

3

LEAD 303

 

Organizational Administration: A European Context (Cannes, France)

 

3

POSC 304

Citizenship in Theory and Practice

3

SOC 306

Social Movements

3

POSC 310

The Presidency

3

LEAD 315

The Multi–Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity Issues in the Workplace

3

PSY 319

Motivation and Emotion

3

LEAD 320

Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion and Service

3

PHIL/REL 325

Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought

3

SOC 325

Social Change

3

PSY 336

Social Psychology

3

SOC 346

Solving Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country

3

PCST/POSC 354

Nonviolent Social Change

3

LEAD 385

Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

3

KINE 386

Leadership in a Team Setting

 

LEAD 396

Gender and Leadership

3

COM 410

Organizational Communication

3

LEAD 429

Experimental Course

1–3

EDUC 470

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

MGMT 480

Human Behavior in Organizations

3

PSY 481

Organizational Psychology

3

LEAD 485

Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

4

LEAD 490

Leadership in Action, Independent Internship

2

LEAD 495

Selected Topics in Leadership and Organization Studies

3

LEAD 499

Individual Study

3

capstone: theory and practice of leadership

leadership practice/application (3 credits minimum)

one of the following

LEAD 380

Service in Action Practicum (3 credits required)

½–4

LEAD 385

Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

3

LEAD 485

Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

4

leadership theory/integration (2 credits)

requirement

LEAD 497

Capstone Seminar: The Leadership Forum

2

total credits

 

21–23

Minor in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education

The Minor in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education prepares the candidate with a breadth of STEM courses in order to prepare for future careers in education and related STEM fields. Admission to the minor requires approval from the integrated educational studies STEM education advisor. Successful completion of MATH 110 Single Variable Calculus I or equivalent is a prerequisite for admission to the minor. All courses in the Minor in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education must be taken for graded option and no grade lower than a "C–" may be earned for credit toward the minor.

A minimum of 24 credits is required.

common requirements (18 credits)

PHYS 101/101L*

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

BIOL 204/204L

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I)/From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I) Lab

4

EDUC 451

Educational Applications of Technology

3

one of the following

MATH 208

Foundations of Geometry

3

MATH 280

Mathematics Tutoring

3

electives (6–8 credits)

two of the following**

ENV 101

Introduction to Environmental Science

3

PHYS 102/102L*

General Physics II/Lab–General Physics II

3,1

ENV 111/111L

Physical Geology/Physical Geology Laboratory, or

3

ENV 112

Introduction to Hazards and Global and Environmental Change

 

MATH 111/111L

Single Variable Calculus II/Single Variable Calculus II Lab

3

PHYS 117

The Beauty of Physics

3

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

KINE 160

Health Education

3

FSN 200

Human Nutrition

3

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

BIOL 205/205L

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II)/Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II) Lab

4

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

KINE 270

Statistics for Allied Health Sciences

3

IES 311

Teaching and Learning Math Concepts, Skills and Critical Thinking

3

total credits

 

24–26

*PHYS 107/107L or PHYS 108/108L may be substituted for PHYS 101/101L or PHYS 102/102L

**Other courses in STEM disciplines may be approved as electives, provided they represent coursework more advanced than the required courses and in consultation with the advisor.

Minor in Secondary Education

The Minor in Secondary Education must be enrolled in a major outside of integrated educational studies. The Minor in Secondary Education is designed for majors in content subject areas, such as mathematics, science, English or other language and history/social science, which are typically taught in secondary (grades 6–12) schools. An integrated educational studies major (or double major) may not choose the Minor in Secondary Education as one of his/her minors.

Up to six credits may be shared between the minor and GE requirements and at least 12 credits of the minor must "stand alone" and cannot be shared. 12 credits of this minor must be upper–division. All courses in the Minor in Secondary Education must be taken for graded option and no grade lower than a "C–" may be earned for credit toward the minor.

common requirements (12 credits)

IES 102

Social Construction of Difference (GE GC)

3

IES 204

Learning and Forgetting: Exploring Theories of Learning

3

IES 206

Schools in Society

3

EDUC 451

Educational Applications of Technology

3

electives (9 credits)

three of the following

IES 301

Organizations, Ethics and Society

3

IES 302

Information, Communication and Management: Theoretical and Practical Issues

3

IES 326

Education Viewed through Feature Film and Television

3

IES 448

Instructional Technology: Science and Mathematics

3

IES 449

Educating with Multiple Technologies

3

total credits

 

21

Course Descriptions – Education

Enrollment in the 400-level credential courses (crosslisted with graduate courses) requires acceptance to the College of Educational Studies credential program.

EDUC 290 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An independent internship or observation, in which, a lower division student develops a learning, observational contract in conjunction with an on-site supervisor and a Chapman CES faculty advisor. 40 hours of observation/internship are required per credit hour. Up to three credits (½–3) per internship site per semester may be earned through internship courses. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

EDUC 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 309 Exploring Education in Contemporary America

Prerequisite, ENG 103. The historical, social, and philosophical foundations of contemporary American public school education, including critical examination of current educational trends and programs. Extensive field trips to a variety of diverse public school settings in Southern California will be included. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

EDUC 399 Individual Study

(Offered every semester.) 1–6 credits.

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education

(Same as EDUC 503.)

EDUC 403 Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy and Learning for Bilingual Settings

(Same as EDUC 502, 502B.)

EDUC 426 Images of Schooling as a Cultural Institution

The class will read novels, plays, and short stories and view films which have schools as their setting, teachers and/or students as their main characters, or education as their primary theme. Selections will include works from a variety of cultures so that cross-cultural comparisons can be made. Each selection will be analyzed in terms of style, imagery, effectiveness, and the insights it provides into the role of schooling in society, educational philosophies, and/or contemporary educational problems and issues. Course projects include a scholarly analysis paper and/or a short story or one-act play. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 429 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 434 Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourse and Social Action

(Same as EDUC 634.)

EDUC 435 Education Workshop Series

(Same as EDUC 635.)

EDUC 443 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

(Same as EDUC 542.)

EDUC 446 Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

(Same as EDUC 546.)

EDUC 451 Educational Applications of Technology

(Same as EDUC 551.)

EDUC 470 Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

(Same as EDUC 570.)

EDUC 471 Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

(Same as EDUC 571.)

EDUC 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An independent internship or observation, in which, an upper-division student develops a learning, observational contract in conjunction with an on-site supervisor and a Chapman CES faculty advisor. 40 hours of observation/internship are required per credit hour. Up to three credits (½–3) per internship site per semester may be earned through internship courses. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

EDUC 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of the dean of the College of Educational Studies, approval of petition. An opportunity for specialized study in an area of concern to the student and a certain amount of flexibility in programming for superior students. Not intended as a substitute for an established course. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Integrated Educational Studies

IES 101 Self and Identity

William James’ construct of the self—the reflective capacity of humans to be I and me, subject and object, knower and known—provides an entry point for this exploration of a unifying construct in psychology, sociology, and other behavioral and social sciences. Students will examine the historical underpinnings of the contemporary notion of the self, the reciprocal relationship between the self and society, and identity theory. Some sections may be restricted to IES majors and IES minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 102 Social Construction of Difference

Exploring the social construction of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability, students will examine how systems of stratification are formed, perpetuated, and interconnected through language and social institutions, such as schools, public policy, and media. Students will also consider how individuals might, within institutional contexts, play a transformative role in the social construction of difference. Some sections may be restricted to IES majors and IES and SEED minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 103 Philosophy of Helping

This course engages foundational concerns of the helping professions from individual, communal, and societal perspectives. Questions explored in this course include, As a society, how do we provide help in ways that are empowering and authentic for those being helped? What are the tensions that inevitably arise when we try to formalize the helping relationship? In addition to exploring the skills that lead to caring, competent, and effective practice, students will develop a personal philosophy of helping that is critical and reflective. Some sections may be restricted to IES majors and IES and DIST minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 112 Writing for Educators

Prerequisites, one 100-level IES course, and major in integrated educational studies, or minor in language and literacy, or consent of instructor. This course is designed primarily for students pursuing careers in formal pre K-12 school settings and non-formal educational or community-based organizations where exemplary professional writing skill is necessary for success in the execution of their future work. Consideration will also be given to how written artifacts shape public images of teachers, students, schools and societies both past, present, and future. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 204 Learning and Forgetting: Exploring Theories of Learning

Prerequisite, IES 101, or 102, or 103, or consent of instructor. This course explores questions related to how people learn, if they should be taught to learn, and why we forget so much of what was learned in school. To answer these questions, students will examine a body of theories of learning that include Socratic methods, behaviorism, constructivism, cognitive learning theories and situated learning. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 205 Learning Across Boundaries: The Power of Cross Disciplinary Curricula

While people easily slide from one role to another (teacher, student, barista, athlete), formal learning and understanding in diverse disciplines is rare. This course asks students to recognize the similarities between disciplines of knowledge and develop strategies for use in their own discipline of study. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 206 Schools in Society

Prerequisite, IES 102, or consent of instructor. This course examines the history, sociology, and philosophy of education in the United States. In addition, the course reviews school formations, current policies and practices in education, and the relationships between schools, their communities, and the larger society. Students will examine how public and non-public schools are organized and operate and will explore factors impacting educational equity, access and student success. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 207 The Pursuit of Happiness and Knowledge: Walt Disney and Charles Darwin

We all declare for happiness and knowledge. Walt Disney primarily entails the world of fantasy and Charles Darwin the reality of nature. We will explore their creations and their beliefs, and delve into some profound ideas underpinning our origins and our happiness. Grading option is letter grade only. Fee: $75. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 229 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

IES 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline that develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IES 295 Education Field Experience

Open to all students. This course is designed to provide students with service experiences at public elementary, middle, and secondary schools, and a selection of after-school educational support centers. The course will integrate tutoring and mentoring activities developed to help enrich the learning of children and adolescents with seminar discussions of education topics arising from these activities. Every effort will be made to ensure students are assigned to settings whose students reflect the ethnic and racial composition of communities in Orange County. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 300 Valuing Differences in American Society

Through a combination of presentations, exercises, discussion, films, and guest speakers, students will examine the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination and the role of economic and political factors in the formation, reproduction, and change of the American racial and ethnic structure. The course also examines the intersection of social class, gender, race and ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Some sections are restricted to IES majors and minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 300A Valuing Differences in Society: Travel Course to Cambodia

This course travels to Cambodia. Educators must understand the challenges faced by minority students, and to understand the complexities involved in adapting pedagogical approaches to meet the needs of diverse learners. This immersion course aims to develop an appreciation of what like to be different, both at home and abroad. May be repeated for credit. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 301 Organizations, Ethics, and Society

Investigating the ubiquitous organization through a variety of theoretical and sociological constructs provides students with an opportunity to understand the complexity of modern organizations. Readings will consider issues of intra-organizational constraints, motivation, power and conflict, purpose and meaning, teamwork and how organizations work to satisfy human needs. Investigating basic concepts of policy construction and analysis help to shed light on the challenges faced by organizations and institutions as they identify and meet social needs. Some sections may be restricted to IES majors and IES and SEED minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 302 Information, Communication and Management: Theoretical and Practical Issues

Giving, receiving, and using information; working with others, and managing tasks and time are skills needed by the effective professional. Students engage in academic and professional writing tasks, work on communication with colleagues, supervisors, and others and develop management systems to support their work. Some sections may be restricted to majors and minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 303 Education Through Life Transitions

Prerequisite, IES 200 level course. Drawing on theories of human development, educational best practices, and social services, the course explores needs and supports for life transitions with a particular emphasis on vulnerable populations. Life transitions explored include developmental transitions but also social and institutional transitions and transitions within families. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 310 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Issues in Education

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals make up a significant minority population in K-12 education. This course explores the experiences of LGBTQ individuals in educational systems and helps students to identify methods to improve inclusion, appreciation, and safety. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 311 Teaching and Learning Math Concepts, Skills and Critical Thinking

Prerequisite, integrated educational studies major, or minor. The focus of this course is to prepare teacher candidates for the teaching of math concepts, skills and critical thinking in California’s public schools. Candidates will become familiar with the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the principles underlying how children learn math, from early childhood to middle school. Candidates will learn effective ways to design instruction in order to include all learners in accessible and rigorous problem-solving that allows students to develop both conceptual and procedural skills. The class will explore psychological aspects of mathematics learning, such as math anxiety and encouraging all students to see themselves as young mathematicians. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 312 Contextual Teaching and Learning of Science

Prerequisites, junior standing, integrated educational studies major, admission to the M.A. curriculum and instruction program, consent of instructor. This course prepares future teachers with the background knowledge, skills, and abilities they will need to impart science content and engage students in ways that promote critical thinking and a love of learning science. Valuing the strengths children bring from their homes and communities, candidates will learn how to differentiate science instruction for students who represent different ability, language, and experiential backgrounds. Using the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards, the content of this course will include scientific thinking and science process skills; life, earth/space, and physical sciences; experimental inquiry; and integration of written and quantitative inquiry in the study of science in discipline-specific and integrated contexts. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IES 313 Teaching History/Social Studies for Diverse Learners

Prerequisites, junior standing, integrated educational studies major, consent of instructor. This course prepares future teachers in the methods of teaching history/social studies to all students, including those who are gendered, racialized and diverse in multiple ways including dis/ability, economically and linguistically. The course engages students in thinking about the social sciences as the study of human relations and offers opportunities to use various models of teaching that support student engagement, critical thinking, and character and ethical development, with application of the Common Core Standards and integration of written and quantitative inquiry skills into history/social studies curriculum and assessment. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IES 314 Adult Learning: Theory, Practice, Experience and the Future

Prerequisite, IES 200 level course. This course explores adult learners, why they learn, and how they learn a range of formal and informal settings. Also explored are the philosophical foundations of adult learning theory and the changing dynamics of the profession taking into account global, economic, technological, and ethical issues. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 315 Non-Governmental Organizations: Policy and Practice

This course explores the nature and function of the non-profit sector within education, the arts, and the helping professions. The course will familiarize students with the advantages and the common challenges faced by such organizations and include fieldwork in NGO’s in the Orange County area. Some sections may be restricted to IES majors and IES minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 316 Aesthetic Education: Philosophy and Practice

This course will nurture appreciative, reflective, cultural, participatory engagements with the arts. Students will explore art-making in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts and will gain heighten perception and challenge preconceived notions, creating the possibility for personal and community change. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 317 Disability, Families, and Society: Issues of Professional Policy and Support

This course will explore the relationships of families and members of the helping professions and how these relationships can work collaboratively to increase the capacity of families and professionals to support inclusive approaches to community participation for people with disabilities. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 326 Education Viewed through Feature Film and Television

Prerequisites, IES 102, 206, or consent of instructor. The participants view and analyze major feature films and television programs that portray a variety of specific aspects of schooling and education. Students will engage in class activities that use the media as focal points for professional self-examination and will consider ways of reconceptualizing and improving reflective practice. Consideration will also be given to how such films and television programming shape public images of teachers, students, and schools both past and present. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 340 Children's Literature and Literacy

Prerequisite, written inquiry course. This course is designed to study the style, technique, and methods for introducing children and young adolescents to literature. Students develop perspectives of literature as instrumental in child development and lifelong learning. Students will identify characteristics of quality literature, understand its role in the curriculum and use instructional strategies to teach a range of students’ needs and interests. Topics include literature genres, multicultural and international literature, censorship, technology, and current educational issues in reading. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 405 Inquiry, Evidence and Decision-Making

Prerequisites, IES 102, 206, 301, integrated educational studies major, consent of instsructor. Good professional practice requires systematic inquiry to generate the types of information and insights needed for effective decision-making. Students investigate a topic of interest while exploring quantitative, qualitative, single-subject, action research, and program evaluation inquiry traditions and methods. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 412 Teaching Writing K-12

Prerequisite, written inquiry course, and IES 112, or IES 200 level course. This course is designed to introduce pre-service students to the research, theory, and practice of teaching writing in grades K-12. Participants will understand and be able to apply the theory and research of learning to write and writing to learn in a variety of genres and disciplines, using writing across the curriculum as well as single-subject emphases to explore the power of writing as a vehicle for learning. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IES 413 Current Issues in Disability Studies and Services

This course introduces students to the field of disability studies and implications for working in disability-related careers. The course explore how disability is portrayed in society through the arts and mass media and review the critique of traditional stereotypes emerging from the disability rights movement. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 415 College Student Development

Prerequisites, IES 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor. This course explores undergraduate college student experiences in the United States. Topics covered include student retention, completion and transfer rates, access, college choice, and personal, social and academic development of college students. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 416 Higher Education and Society

Prerequisite, IES 301, or 415. American institutions of higher education are simultaneously praised and criticized. This course will focus on the history of higher education in the U.S., including an investigation of its changing goals, governance, and relationships with stakeholders in the institution and in society. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 444 Aesthetics and Learning: Florence, Italy

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is taught in Florence, Italy. Students explore the catalytic change in intellectual and aesthetic processes, moving from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, the confluence of forces that shaped the creative explosion of the arts in both the sacred and everyday lives of people. They investigate the paradigm shift to a new perspective, one that supports the human potential to create the aesthetic in all modes of living. Students experience art and make connections to their own aesthetic processes. Some sections of this course may be restricted to majors, or minors only. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

IES 448 Instructional Technology: Science and Mathematics

Prerequisite, EDUC 451, or familiar with computer technology and software applications used in educational settings. A focused look at methods of using selected Web 2.0 tools and software applications to infuse technology into the instruction of science and mathematics topics. Provides hands-on experiences in the practical use of technology-based tools for making science and mathematics more accessible to learners in both classroom and online settings. Addresses the role of digital citizenship concerns in the selection of web-based tools for instructional purposes. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IES 449 Educating With Multiple Technologies

Prerequisite, EDUC 451, or familiar with computer technology and software applications used in educational settings. A focused look at selected current topics centered on the infusion of technology in the field of education. Provides experiences in the practical use of technology-based tools for teaching and learning, establishing a foundation for educators to become adept in the selection, evaluation, and implementation of current technological tools. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IES 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

IES 492 IES Senior Seminar Internship

Prerequisites, IES 405, senior standing, integrated educational studies major, consent of instructor. Seminar-based practicum in which students meet regularly as a group with a faculty member to share, discuss and evaluate their experiences in schools and other community-based educational settings, assemble IES ePortfolios, and complete Senior Capstone Project. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Leadership Studies

LEAD 101 Introduction to Leadership: Principles and Practices

A survey of essential leadership principles and practices through classical and contemporary readings drawn from the humanities and social sciences. Topics include: vision, decision-making, team–building, ethics, and servant–leadership. May include participation in a co–curricular leadership project. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

LEAD 229 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, LEAD 101, or leadership studies minor, or consent of instructor. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in leadership. Some sections of this course may be restricted to leadership studies minors only. May be repeated for credit if course content is different, up to a maximum of 6 credits. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

LEAD 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

LEAD 301 Theory and Practice of Leadership

Prerequisite, leadership minor, or cluster, or consent of instructor, or program coordinator. Examines leadership from theoretical and practical perspectives, including trait, behavioral and contingency models. Focuses on skills essential for creating organizations in which people can develop their potential as leaders. Topics include: leadership styles, communication, motivation, decision-making, integrity, teams, culture, diversity, and change. May be used by upper class or transfer students in the leadership studies minors to substitute for LEAD 101. Some sections of this course may be restricted to leadership studies minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

LEAD 314 Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. Explores theory and practice of team-building and benefits of team-based/shared leadership. Enhances participants’ understanding of themselves and others, with emphasis on how personality type impacts group interactions. Topics covered through lecture, self-assessments, experiential exercises, and hands-on team consulting projects include: Emotional intelligence, Jungian theory (temperament, interaction style, cognitive processes), stages of group development, conflict and collaboration, leadership communication, and the facilitation process. Includes participation in an adventure-based weekend retreat. Some sections of this course may be restricted to leadership studies minors only. Fee: $300. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

LEAD 315 The Multi–Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity Issues in the Workplace

Prerequisite, admission to the Leadership Studies Program, or declared cluster in leadership, or consent of instructor. Explores importance of valuing cultural differences in the workplace particularly as applied to leadership, communication, teamwork, decision–making, and problem–solving. Reading, writing, research, and discussion are supplemented with exercises, role–plays, and simulations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

LEAD 320 Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion and Service

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. Explores the role and origins of personal integrity, passion, and commitment to service in leadership. Examines the nature of leadership by delving into the psyche of leaders like Mahatma Gandhi, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Films, readings, case studies, and research into a famous leader's life and experiences. Some sections of this course may be restricted to leadership studies minors only. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

LEAD 380 Service in Action Practicum

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of the instructor. Student-initiated civic engagement or service-learning project involving direct application of the principles of servant leadership through on-going journaling, contextual analysis and reflective analysis of a service experience. 40 hours of total effort (on-site experience, readings, meetings, reflection, and writing) are required per credit. May be used to satisfy the 3-credit applied capstone requirement for the LEAD minor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–4 credits.

LEAD 385 Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. Application of social change models of leadership to civic engagement and social justice issues in American society. Includes participation in a significant service-learning activity. Topics include: Social change model of leadership; power and collaboration; service and social responsibility; citizenship in a democratic society. May be used to satisfy the applied capstone requirement for the leadership studies minor. Some sections of this course may be restricted to leadership studies minors only. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

LEAD 396 Gender and Leadership

Prerequisite, LEAD 101, or 301, or 414, or consent of instructor. Examines gender differences in the practice of leadership, communication, ethical decision-making, and moral development. Topics include men’s and women's approaches to influence, power, collaboration, leadership relationships, change, service, conflict and competition, and the forging of mutual purposes. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

LEAD 414 Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or consent of instructor. Contrasts Western conceptions of leadership with Eastern, Native American, and feminist models. Participants explore their purpose, workaholism and life-work balance, and focus on leading as a way of serving. Leadership theories are supplemented by experiential exercises, case studies, self-assessments, and a required weekend retreat. P/NP. Fee: $250. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

LEAD 429 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, LEAD 101, or leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in leadership. May be repeated for credit if course content is different, up to a maximum of 6 credits. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

LEAD 475 Introduction to Students Affairs in Higher Education

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or integrated educational studies major, or consent of instructor. Explores the role of student affairs in higher education, including professional principles guiding student and campus life. Exposes students with interests in this area to the theoretical and philosophical foundations of student affairs and the range of student affairs programs and services. Seminar format. Topics include: Student development, campus culture, creating an inclusive climate, contemporary issues and trends, leadership and service. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

LEAD 485 Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. Relational Leadership, Social Change and Servant Leadership Models are applied to comprehensive case-study analysis of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans, with emphasis on moral leadership and integrity. Includes travel to New Orleans to engage in service-learning/rebuilding efforts. May be used to satisfy the applied capstone requirement for the leadership studies minor. P/NP. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 4 credits.

LEAD 490 Leadership in Action, Independent Internship

An independent practicum in which a student develops a learning contract in conjunction with an on–site supervisor and a Chapman leadership faculty advisor. 40 hours of total effort are required per credit hour of LEAD 490. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) ½–4 credits.

LEAD 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

LEAD 492 Leadership in Action, Seminar Internship

Seminar–based practicum in which interns meet regularly as a group with a faculty member to share, discuss, and evaluate their experiences. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) ½–4 credits.

LEAD 495 Selected Topics in Leadership and Organization Studies

Prerequisite, leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor. Covers special topics related to leadership and/or organization studies, subject to emerging situational, student and/or employer demands. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit if course content is different. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

LEAD 497 Capstone Seminar: The Leadership Forum

Prerequisite, leadership minor, or consent of instructor. Capstone course devoted to examining contemporary leadership issues and challenges. Students prepare a comprehensive leadership philosophy, covering both theory and practice. Includes required fieldtrip(s) and/or a retreat. Progress toward LEAD Program objectives and career implications are also assessed. Fee: $100. (Offered every semester.) 2 credits.

LEAD 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, junior standing, consent of instructor, and leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster. Students engage in directed reading and/or research and then write a major paper on a special problem or topic related to leadership and organization studies. Intended for junior and senior students only. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.