Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences

Janeen Hill, Ph.D., Dean

Professors: Frisch, Glynn, Griffin, Hill, Kennedy, Kugler, Lessor, Montgomery, McKenzie, Redding, Schandler, Sumida;

Associate Professors: Bennett, Bisoffi, Brechter, Brodbeck, Cleary, Duff, Grant–Beuttler, John, Peterson, Pincus, Shears;

Assistant Professors: Abbott, Boehm, Choi, Dodd, Frederick, Gildersleeve, Gilliland, Hahn–Holbrook, Hellberg, Nottingham, Smith;

Clinical Professor: McMicken;

Clinical Associate Professors: Danyleyko, Mais, Tierney, Young;

Clinical Assistant Professors: Brown, Ito, Jonathan, Lal, Lesnick, Marquez, Puri, Tominaga, Vogel;

Instructional Associate Professor: Mosconi, Sternlicht;

Instructional Assistant Professors: Dana, Richards, Rowland–Goldsmith, Walker.

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Studies

The Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences offers high demand, high quality graduate programs in physical therapy, marriage and family therapy, athletic training, communication sciences and disorders and physician assistant studies. These programs prepare tomorrow's healthcare professional to work as members of inter–professional teams, to incorporate technology in practice, to emphasize a bio–psycho–social perspective to understand health and disease and to inform professional practice with cutting–edge science. All programs in Crean College are distinguished by their commitment to engage graduate students in faculty–mentored student research, internships, problem–centered learning and clinical experiences.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Physical therapists evaluate, educate and provide intervention to patients and clients in order to help prevent, correct and alleviate issues resulting in disorders of movement. The responsibilities of the physical therapist also include collaboration with other professionals, teaching, research, administration and consultation. Physical therapy services are provided in such diverse settings as hospitals, out–patient clinics, rehabilitation centers, private practices, voluntary health agencies and home healthcare agencies, schools for children with disabilities, public schools and sports therapy clinics.

The Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is designed for those individuals who wish to enter the field of physical therapy. The 129–credit program consists of both didactic and clinical courses, which include all content areas expected for accreditation and for eligibility to sit for the licensure exam given by the Physical Therapy Board of California or other states. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (www.apta.org). The program is the oldest continually accredited physical therapy educational program in the country.

Application process and admission requirements

Chapman University's Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program uses the Physical Therapy Centralized Application System (PTCAS). Applications may be obtained from PTCAS at www.ptcas.org and will be available the year prior to intended matriculation, beginning each year in July. Applicants may apply and indicate their preference for a desired fall, summer or both enrollment date; application deadline is generally in November. Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university by the time of matriculation into the Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Chapman University participates in early decision admission which requires a higher grade point average and a higher Graduate Record Examination score (see below). International applicants must have coursework evaluated by an appropriate agency and must hold a degree equivalent to a baccalaureate degree earned in the United States. International applicants also must submit TOEFL scores and financial certification. Contact the international admission officer at Chapman University for specific requirements and additional information.

Grade and Graduate Record Examination requirements

Early decision admission

Early decision is a binding option for applicants with demonstrated high academic performance and who desire an early decision from Chapman University. Applicants will be able to apply to only one early decision program in PTCAS. In addition to the PTCAS application, applicants must arrange for PTCAS to receive all official U.S. transcripts and fee payment by the early decision deadline in August, a year prior to your intended matriculation. If the application, transcripts or fee arrive after the early decision deadline, PTCAS will automatically change the applicant’s file from early decision status to "regular" status. Early decision applicants will be given priority in the PTCAS verification process. Preference for admissions is given to applicants with the highest GPA and GRE scores. The following criteria are required for early decision admission:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.500 or higher (on a 4.000 scale).
  2. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.500 or higher (on a 4.000 scale) with no course grade below a "C". No more than two science courses and a total of three prerequisite courses may be remaining when the application is submitted and must be completed before matriculation into the program. Applicants with the least remaining prerequisite coursework may be given preference over other applicants.
  3. An official GRE score is required for early decision. The exam must have been taken within the last five years and scores from various test dates are not combined. Please contact ETS for further information (www.ets.org). Early decision applicants must take the GRE before July. The minimum acceptable scores for early decision admissions are as follows:

    Minimum required scores for GRE exam:

Regular admission

The following criteria are required for regular admission:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.000 scale).
  2. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.000 scale) with no course grade below a "C". No more than two science courses and a total of three prerequisite courses may be remaining when the application is submitted. Applicants with the least remaining prerequisite coursework may be given preference over other applicants.
  3. An official GRE score is required for regular admission. GRE scores will be considered relative to the scores of other applicants and the GPAs. The exam must have been taken within the last five years and scores from various test dates are not combined. Please contact ETS for further information (www.ets.org). Applicants must take the GRE by the application deadline. The minimum acceptable scores for regular admissions are as follows:

    Minimum required scores for GRE exam:

Other requirements for all applicants

  1. Transcripts reflecting the fall semester grades must be officially submitted and are required for an admission decision.
  2. Satisfactory completion of 40 hours of observation (or paid work) in different practice settings supervised by physical therapists.
  3. Prerequisite coursework as follows (courses taken at institutions that award quarter hour credits must be equivalent to courses with semester hour credits):

Course

Duration

Note

Biology

two courses with lab

not botany

Human Anatomy

one course with lab

within the last five years; mammalian not acceptable

Human Physiology

one course with lab

within the last five years

General Chemistry

one year sequence with labs

introductory course is not acceptable

General Physics

one year sequence with labs

introductory course is not acceptable

Psychology/Human Behavior

one course

at least three semester hour credits

Statistics

one course

at least three semester hour credits

Chapman University's DPT prerequisite coursework is in accordance with the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and may be subject to change.

Additional information

  1. All science prerequisite courses must be courses for science majors.
  2. Human anatomy and physiology must have been taken within the last five years. If a combined Anatomy/Physiology course is taken, two semester or three quarter courses are required.
  3. All other prerequisite courses must have been taken within the last 10 years.
  4. Prerequisite courses may be repeated only once; the higher grade will be used to calculate prerequisite GPA.
  5. Courses which have received advanced placement credit (AP or CLEP) may fulfill prerequisite requirements. The credit hours and grade points will not be computed in the GPA calculation.
  6. Students who are offered admission are required to financially commit an enrollment deposit of $500. Generally, the deposit must be received within two weeks of notification of admission.
  7. All remaining prerequisite coursework and the awarding of a baccalaureate degree must occur before the student matriculates.
  8. Students must satisfactorily complete all remaining prerequisite course requirements in accordance with the admission requirements.
  9. Accepted students are required to meet technical standards and specific health requirements (such as physical examinations and vaccinations). Information on these standards and requirements, as well as such information as program costs, financial aid and acceptance and matriculation rates may be found on the department’s website at www.chapman.edu/pt.
  10. Chapman University considers all applicants without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, special needs, veteran status or any other characteristic protected by applicable state or federal civil rights laws. Some information requested in the application is requested for federal or accreditation reporting and will not be used in a discriminatory manner.
  11. Persons who have been dismissed from another physical therapy program are not eligible for consideration for admission to Chapman University.
  12. Applicants who decline or are denied admission may reapply in any subsequent year. Admission requirements are subject to change and admission in one year does not guarantee admission in any subsequent year.
  13. Persons who have been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor may not be eligible for licensure in any or some states even after successful completion of a physical therapy program. Contact the appropriate state licensing board for additional information.

Exceptions

Applicants who do not meet minimum GPA or GRE scores, specific prerequisite course requirements or the five– or ten–year time frame for specific courses may seek an exception. A written request stating the extenuating circumstances supporting the exception should be submitted with the application or within ten days of notification that the requirements are not met. Students who feel they were denied admission due to an error or feel they were treated arbitrarily or capriciously should appeal to the department chair.

Ethical and professional standards

Students enrolled in the professional curriculum must sign a statement to agree to abide by the APTA Code of Ethics, APTA Guide for Professional Conduct, (found on the APTA website at www.apta.org) and Chapman University’s Standards of Academic Integrity (see Handbook for Physical Therapy Students on the department website). Students also must acknowledge their ability to carry out the technical standards and essential functions of the physical therapy curriculum at the time of matriculation into the program.

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program involves preparing people to work with the public. The faculty assumes the responsibility for reasonably assuring that individuals who complete the program are not only academically competent, but also aware and capable of functioning within the established ethical and professional standards of the profession. The department has both the right and obligation to continually evaluate students and if necessary, to dismiss students based on these professional standards as well as academic performance expectations. This philosophy is consistent with other physical therapy programs, which are engaged explicitly or implicitly in certifying that their graduates are competent to engage in the practice of physical therapy.

Candidate dismissal by the department

A student may be dismissed from the department and the University for reasons of professional, academic or clinical performance, clinical or personal misconduct or violation(s) of the Academic Integrity Policy. Prior to dismissal, efforts will be made by the faculty to assist the student in removing areas of deficiency. If such assistance does not result in improved performance to an acceptable level, the student can be dismissed from the program. The department chair will make final decisions of dismissal following consultation with the faculty. Students are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.000 on all coursework within the curriculum. Clinical misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, unsafe practices that might endanger the patient, the student or the therapist. Personal misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, actions that are intended to berate the patients, peers, faculty, department or the profession.

Any student dismissed by the department has the right to appeal the decision in accordance with the appeal process (see academic policies and procedures section of the catalog). The student shall continue in the program until the appeal process is exhausted, but may be removed from coursework and or clinical experiences pending resolution of the appeal. If the appeal is successful, the student will continue in the program on a probationary status. The student must meet the criteria to be removed from probationary status within two semesters of the successful appeal. If the decision for dismissal stands following his/her appeal, the student will be dismissed from the department and the University.

Requirements for the Doctor of Physical Therapy

The following credits must be completed for degree conferral. (The curriculum is subject to change and students will be notified by the department.)

requirements (108 credits)

PT 510

Functional Human Anatomy I

4

PT 510L

Functional Human Anatomy I Laboratory

PT 511

Biomechanics of Human Movement

2

PT 511L

Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab

1

PT 512

Kinesiological Motion Analysis

2

PT 512L

Kinesiology Lab

1

PT 513

Developmental Anatomy

1

PT 521

Applied Neurophysiology

3

PT 522

Functional Human Neuroanatomy I

PT 522L

Functional Human Neuroanatomy I Laboratory

½

PT 523

Functional Human Neuroanatomy II

PT 523L

Functional Human Neuroanatomy II Laboratory

½

PT 525

Clinical Pathophysiology: General Medicine

4

PT 525L

Clinical Pathophysiology Lab

1

PT 526

Clinical Pathology: Orthopedic

3

PT 527

Clinical Pathology: Neurology

3

PT 530

Physical Therapy Examination

4

PT 531

General Medicine Practice Management

2

PT 531L

General Medicine Practice Management Laboratory

2

PT 535

Musculoskeletal Practice Management I: Lower Quarter

5

PT 539

Physical Agents

3

PT 591

Clinical Practicum I

1

PT 610

Functional Human Anatomy II

2

PT 638

Musculoskeletal Practice Management II: Upper Quarter

4

PT 640

Neurological Practice Management

3

PT 640L

Neurological Practice Management Laboratory

2

PT 641

Rehabilitation Practice Management

4

PT 643

Motor Control and Motor Learning

2

PT 643L

Motor Control and Motor Learning Laboratory

1

PT 646

Cardiopulmonary Practice Management

3

PT 647

Pediatric Practice Management

PT 647L

Pediatric Practice Management Laboratory

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1, 1

PT 651

Scientific Inquiry II

3

PT 665

Diagnostic Imaging

PT 670

Cultural Diversity and Psychology of Health Care

PT 671

Physical Therapy Ethics

3

PT 683

PT and the Health Care System

½, ½

PT 691

Clinical Practicum II

1

PT 712

Pharmacology

PT 742

Geriatric Practice Management

3

PT 748

Wellness and Complementary Medicine

2

PT 752

Scientific Inquiry III

1

PT 753

Scientific Inquiry IV

1

PT 758

Elective in Physical Therapy

2, 2

PT 771

Responsible Leadership and Administration

4

PT 782

Applied Administration

2

one of the following (6½ credits)*

PT 689/692

Service Learning/Clinical Experience I–12

½, 6

PT 689/693

Service Learning/Clinical Experience I–8

2½, 4

one of the following (6½ credits)*

PT 789/793

Service Learning/Clinical Experience II–12

½, 6

PT 789/794

Service Learning/Clinical Experience II–8

2½, 4

one of the following (8 credits)

PT 795

Clinical Experience III

8

PT 796A, 796B

Clinical Experience IIIA, Clinical Experience IIIB

4, 4

PT 796A, 796C

Clinical Experience IIIA, Clinical Experience IIIC

4, 4

PT 796A, 796I

Clinical Experience IIIA, International Clinical Experience

4, 4

capstone requirement (credits included above)

Students are required to complete a successful capstone project before graduation. This requirement shall be fulfilled by completing the course sequence below.

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1

PT 651

Scientific Inquiry II

3

PT 752

Scientific Inquiry III

1

PT 752

Scientific Inquiry III

1

total credits (subject to change)

 

129

*minimum of 20 weeks must be completed

Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy

The transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree (tDPT) is a post–professional degree designed to provide educational opportunity to physical therapy professionals seeking to be doctorally prepared. The transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree will augment your existing physical therapist preparation. It is intended to provide physical therapists with bachelor or master degrees sufficient knowledge to gain parity with the entry level Doctor of Physical Therapist degree requirements. In keeping with the mission of Chapman University to provide personalized education, we emphasize self–assessment of current accomplishments and professional competencies which will be utilized to develop a curricular plan to address your individual needs.

The program is an online hybrid program, to allow flexibility for practicing physical therapists while retaining that personal attention. The program strives to be consistent with APTA’s plan to meet the practice and professional needs of practitioners, offer flexible and accessible curricula appropriate for a doctoring profession and build upon the knowledge and experience of the practitioner to examine and intervene in problems affecting the movement system.

Admission requirements

  1. Current license to practice physical therapy in the United States.
  2. Application form, curriculum vitae including indication of highest clinical degree and application fee.
  3. Computer resources and skills sufficient for participation in online courses.

Program costs

Tuition and fees are set by University policy. Current tuition and fees may be found in the online Chapman University graduate catalog. Please contact the department for additional information or visit www.chapman.edu. The program is designed to be flexible to allow students to enroll in one to two courses at a time. Rates are subject to change.

Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum (postprofessional/transitional tract)

The program may be completed by students with prior baccalaureate degree or a certificate or a master’s degree. Students with a baccalaureate degree or a certificate complete 26 credits. Students with a master’s degree complete 24 credits. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours of graduate coursework must be completed for the transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Chapman University.

Students may be qualified to place out of one or more courses in the program. In order to place out of a course, students should examine the curriculum and provide evidence to demonstrate prior completion of course content. Submission will be reviewed to determine an individual plan of completion of the transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

Requirements for students holding a baccalaureate degree

core courses (22 credits)

PTT 702

Principles of Evidence Based Practice

2

PTT 703

Scientific Inquiry in Physical Therapy

2

PTT 710

Diagnostic Imaging

3

PTT 711

Applied Pharmacology

3

PTT 720

Screening Examinations

3

PTT 721

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

2

PTT 722

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

2

PTT 723

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

2

PTT 725

Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

3

electives (4 credits)

Electives will be determined and approved in consultation with the department chair

4

total credits

 

26

Requirements for students holding a master's degree

core courses (20 credits)

PTT 702

Principles of Evidence Based Practice

2

PTT 710

Diagnostic Imaging

3

PTT 711

Applied Pharmacology

3

PTT 720

Screening Examinations

3

PTT 721

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

2

PTT 722

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

2

PTT 723

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

2

PTT 725

Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

3

electives (4 credits)

Electives will be determined and approved in consultation with the department chair

4

total credits

 

24

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

The Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences offers a Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree designed to provide the student with the academic and professional training necessary for a career in marriage and family therapy (MFT). The program includes a substantial clinical training component in which students work under the supervision of licensed marriage and family therapists at Chapman University's on–site MFT training clinic. This MFT program may also serve as a foundation for further graduate study in Marriage and Family Therapy or one of the related disciplines. Students in this program complete a minimum of 60 semester credits.

Admission deadlines

The admission deadline is February 1 (financial aid deadline) for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester.

Admission to the program

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  2. Have an accumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.000 or better. Applicants with a grade point average below 3.300 are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  3. Complete the application for admission and the non–discrimination policy and licensure notification.
  4. Submit official transcripts from the degree granting institution.
  5. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals actively engaged in teaching and/or clinical practice, who are in a position to evaluate your academic and personal qualifications for the program. The school may contact the authors of recommendations to discuss your qualifications.
  6. Submit a personal statement which must be no more than three double spaced typed pages in length. The statement should address how each of the following areas contributed to your career objectives and prepared you to begin graduate studies in marriage and family therapy:
    1. Educational background;
    2. Professional work experience (clinical internships or volunteer work) in mental health, human services or related fields;
    3. Personal or family background and experiences.
  7. Submit a resume or curriculum vitae.

Completed online applications are initially reviewed by the Office of Graduate Admission. The applications on file are forwarded to the Marriage and Family Therapy program where they are reviewed by the graduate faculty. Applicant files are carefully read and reviewed for fit with the program’s educational goals and training. Due to the volume of qualified applicants, not all applicants will receive an offer letter.

Coursework program

The program manager evaluates the student’s transcripts and program application materials and if the student is qualified and approved for admission prepares a plan of study indicating the student’s status at the university, any program prerequisites still to be completed and the courses constituting the program emphasis. Any courses accepted for transfer into the program are also identified. Questions about prerequisites, program requirements, transfer credits, etc. should be discussed and resolved with the program manager at the time the coursework program is created to avoid later confusion.

Advisement

Newly admitted students are required to meet with the program manager to discuss and clarify any questions about the program and future career plans after acceptance to the program. Students are required to meet with the program manager prior to beginning the program to develop a written plan of study. Students are also strongly encouraged to meet with the program manager before registering for classes each semester.

Transfer policy

Students admitted to the M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy degree may transfer up to six credits of graduate coursework from another graduate program upon approval of a petition by the program director and the dean of the school. This policy includes graduate–level classes from regionally accredited universities. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer policies.)

Graduate prerequisites

The applicant must possess a bachelor’s degree in psychology, family studies, social work or a related field from an accredited college or university or must show evidence of satisfactory academic background in all of the following:

  1. Introduction to psychology.
  2. Abnormal psychology.
  3. Developmental psychology or human development.
  4. Research methods.

Applicants must be enrolled in or have completed three of the four required prerequisite courses by the admission deadline. All prerequisites must be met by the time the student has completed his or her first semester.

Ethical and professional standards

Since the Marriage and Family Therapy program involves preparing people to work with the public, the program assumes the responsibility for reasonably assuring that individuals who complete the program are not only academically competent, but are aware and capable of functioning within the established ethical and professional standards of the profession. Students in the Marriage and Family Therapy graduate program must adhere to the ethical standards held and enforced by the relevant professional associations and should understand that they are being trained in a program that is not only academic, but also professional in nature.

The University has both the right and obligation to evaluate continually and, if necessary, to terminate the student’s participation in the master’s program at any point for ethical violations and/or personal unsuitability for the profession. This philosophy is consistent with that of most graduate programs that are engaged in explicitly or implicitly certifying that their graduates are competent to engage in the practice of professional counseling or psychotherapy.

Candidate dismissal

A student may be dismissed from the department and the University for reasons of professional, academic or clinical performance, clinical or personal misconduct or violation(s) of the Academic Integrity Policy. Prior to dismissal, efforts will be made by the faculty to assist the student in removing areas of deficiency. If such assistance does not result in improved performance to an acceptable level, the student can be dismissed from the program. The chair will make final decisions of dismissal following consultation with the faculty. Students are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.000 on all coursework within the curriculum. Clinical misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, unsafe practices that might endanger the patient, the student or the therapist. Personal misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, actions that are intended to berate the patients, peers, faculty, department or the profession.

Any student dismissed by the department has the right to appeal the decision in accordance with the appeal process (see academic policies and procedures section of the catalog). The student shall continue in the program until the appeal process is exhausted, but may be removed from coursework and or clinical experiences pending resolution of the appeal. If the decision for dismissal stands following his/her appeal, the student will be dismissed from the department and the University.

Advancement to candidacy

During the semester before students plan to begin the first practicum, they should notify the program manager of their intent to sit for advancement to candidacy. Regularly scheduled advancements take place three times a year–once in the fall semester (typically in November), once in the spring semester (typically in April) and once during the summer. Advancement candidates must have satisfactorily completed or be successfully completing MFT 516, 541, 556, 561, 565, 570, 573, 578, 583, 618 and a minimum of 40 credits. To qualify for advancement to candidacy, students must be in good academic standing. Students who are on academic probation cannot sit for advancement. Students on academic probation may petition to advance each semester. Approval of the petition will only be awarded by a unanimous vote of the graduate faculty. At the advancement to candidacy interview, students will meet with a faculty committee. It will be that committee’s responsibility to determine whether students are then prepared to be formally declared a candidate for a master of arts degree and be permitted to proceed into the practicum phase of the program. Students who fail advancement to candidacy three times will be dismissed from the program.

At the time of the advancement interview, each student will be provided with a clinical vignette. The student will discuss a diagnosis and a tentative treatment plan, which will be the foundation of the advancement interview. The treatment plan will address identification of problems, proposed interventions, ethical issues, prognosis, further assessment and any clinical issues that may need further attention. Successful advancement to candidacy is a prerequisite to enrolling in practicum.

Personal therapy

Participating as a client in individual or group therapy is an important educational aspect of a program to prepare mental health professionals. Experience as a client in personal therapy is, therefore, one of the program requirements. The requirement is met through a minimum of sixteen hours of individual or group therapy conducted by a licensed marriage and family therapist, licensed clinical social worker, licensed clinical psychologist or board–eligible psychiatrist. Verification will consist of a letter by the therapist (on the therapist’s letterhead) stating the time spent in therapy, sent directly to the program manager. This verification must be on file at the time the student applies for graduation.

Personal therapy may also at any time be required by the program. Commencement of therapy or recommendation of additional therapy may be a stipulation or condition at any time during the program. The student has the right to choose his or her own therapist for this requirement within the limitations of ethical standards prohibiting dual relationships and the criteria of the paragraph above.

Optional external traineeship

After completion of a minimum of 12 credits of coursework, students can elect to participate in an external traineeship. Students who pursue off–site practicum training must seek approval by the clinic director before the proposed starting date. The student should obtain the required forms from the clinic director well in advance of the deadline to enable him/her to fully comply with the requirements for the practicum and to deal with any special problems or circumstances that may affect the acceptability of the proposed practicum site.

Practicum

Minimum requirements for beginning practicum include:

  1. Advancement to candidacy.
  2. A minimum of 40 completed credits of program coursework.

Comprehensive examination

Students enrolled in the Marriage and Family Therapy program must take and pass a comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination covers six core competency areas that are reflective of the areas required for state licensure as a marriage and family therapist. The examination is administered each year, in September and in February. Students are required to take the examination immediately following their advancement to practicum. Study packets are available and contain information about the examination, study preparation ideas and an explanation of how the examination is scored. A passing score in the corresponding courses does not assure the student a passing grade on the examination. In the event that the student does not attain a passing score on the examination, he or she must repeat the entire examination. Three failures to obtain a passing grade on the examination are grounds for dismissal from the program. (See the academic policies and procedures section for additional guidelines.)

Continuous enrollment fee

The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the coursework.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

theoretical foundation (12 credits)

MFT 541

Theories I

3

MFT 556

Theories II

3

MFT 561

Couple Therapy

3

MFT 583

Advanced Theoretical Applications

3

clinical courses (14 credits)

MFT 516

Assessment of Individuals and Families

2

MFT 565

Diagnosis and Treatment of Children and Adolescents

3

MFT 570

Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis

3

MFT 573

Crisis Management and Clinical Process

3

MFT 605

Group Therapy

3

specialized clinical courses (7 credits)

MFT 533

Psychopharmacology for Marriage and Family Therapists

3

MFT 582

Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions

2

MFT 588

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

2

family development, diversity and client advocacy (9 credits)

MFT 610

Family Life Cycle and Aging

3

MFT 618

Multicultural Issues in Therapy

3

MFT 620

Public Mental Health

3

professional issues, ethics and research (6 credits)

MFT 532

Research and Bibliographic Methods

3

MFT 578

Ethical and Professional Issues for Marriage and Family Therapists

3

clinical practicum (12 credits)

MFT 694

Practicum I (taken over 3 consecutive semesters)

4,4,4

total credits

 

60

optional list of electives

MFT 595

Advanced Topics in Marriage and Family Therapy

3

MFT 675

Career Counseling

3

MFT 689

Practicum II

1–3

MFT 699

Individual Study

3

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Athletic trainers (ATs) are healthcare professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. The services provided by ATs comprise prevention, diagnosis and intervention of emergency, acute and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations and disabilities. Athletic Training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA) as a healthcare profession. The Master of Science in Athletic Training (M.S. AT) is a full–time, cohort–model program. Admission into the M.S. in Athletic Training program is highly competitive and limited.

The M.S. in Athletic Training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) as a professional graduate program in athletic training. The program has been developed to meet the rigorous educational competencies set by the National Athletic Trainers' Association and CAATE's standards for the accreditation of professional athletic training programs. Based on philosophical foundations, experiential learning and evidence–based practice, the comprehensive didactic and clinical education curriculum prepares students to challenge the Board of Certifications, Inc. (BOC) Certification Examination and for careers as certified athletic trainers in numerous practice settings. Specific program requirements, retention policy, technical standards and program handbook can all be found on the M.S. in Athletic Training website.

Application process and admission requirements

Chapman University's M.S. in Athletic Training program uses the Athletic Training Centralized Application System (ATCAS). Applications may be obtained from ATCAS at http://caate.net/apply-now/ and will be available the year prior to your intended matriculation, beginning each year in July. The M.S. in Athletic Training program has two routes for admission, with each route requiring the prospective student to complete the required course prerequisites.

Regular admission

The following criteria are required for regular admission:

  1. An earned B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher.
  3. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.000 scale) with no course grade below a "C".

3 + 2 accelerated admission

The following criteria are required for 3 + 2 accelerated admission:

  1. Kinesiology or Health Science undergraduate major at Chapman University.
  2. All general education courses completed prior to matriculation.
  3. All kinesiology major courses completed with the exception of emphasis area courses (24 credits of the M.S. in Athletic Training program will count towards the undergraduate degree requirements and will be used for the area of emphasis within the kinesiology major).
  4. Minimum of 100 completed undergraduate credits prior to matriculation.
  5. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher.
  6. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.000 scale with no course grade below a "C").

Other requirements for all applicants

  1. Completed GRE.
  2. Satisfactory completion of 200 hours of observation supervised by certified athletic trainers.
  3. Three letters of recommendation which describe academic and clinical abilities (one must be from a supervising certified athletic trainer and another must be from an academic advisor or instructor).
  4. (International Students Only) – Applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum 550 (paper–based) or 80 (internet–based).

Required prerequisites

Prerequisite course syllabi are required at the time of application.

  1. Human Anatomy + Lab
  2. Human Physiology + Lab
  3. Human Nutrition
  4. Kinesiology or Biomechanics
  5. Exercise Physiology + Lab
  6. General Psychology
  7. Athletic Training/Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Recommended courses

  1. Statistics
  2. Physics
  3. Chemistry

Additional information

  1. If a combined Anatomy/Physiology course is taken, two–semester or three–quarter courses are required.
  2. Prerequisite courses may be repeated only once; the second grade will then be used to calculate GPA.
  3. Pass/Credit grades for prerequisite courses will be converted to a "C" if letter grading options are not available.
  4. Courses which have received advanced placement credit (AP or CLEP) may fulfill prerequisite requirements. The credit hours and grade points will not be computed in the GPA calculation.
  5. CPR certification required. Emergency cardiac care or CPR/AED for the professional rescuer (note: online CPR courses and Lay Responder Certification are not accepted).
  6. Students who are offered admission are required to financially commit and enrollment deposit with the Office of Graduate Admission. Generally, the deposit must be received within two weeks of notification of admission.
  7. Students must satisfactorily complete all remaining prerequisite course requirements in accordance with the admission requirements before beginning M.S. in Athletic Training coursework.
  8. Accepted students are required to meet technical standards and specific health requirements (e.g., vaccinations). Information on these standards and requirements, as well as such information as program costs, financial aid and acceptance and BOC pass rates may be found on the program's website.
  9. Personal interview: After initial assessment and screening of applications, a portion of selected applicants will be required to be available for an online interview with the faculty admissions committee.
  10. Persons who have been dismissed from another athletic training program are not eligible for consideration for admission to Chapman University.
  11. Applicants who decline or are denied admission may reapply in any subsequent year. Admission requirements are subject to change, and admission in one year does not guarantee admission in any subsequent year.
  12. Persons who cannot pass an FBI/Department of Justice Background Check are not eligible for clinical education rotations and are not admissible to the program.
  13. Chapman University considers all applicants without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, special needs, veteran status or any other characteristic protected by applicable state or federal civil rights laws. Some information requested in the application is requested for federal or accreditation reporting and will not be used in a discriminatory manner.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Athletic Training

evidence–based practice/clinical research project (8 credits)

AT 501

Seminar in Evidence–Based Practice I: Foundations of EBP

2

AT 502

Seminar in Evidence–Based Practice II: Research Design and Biostatistics

3

AT 601

Seminar in Evidence–Based Practice III

1

AT 602

Seminar in Evidence–Based Practice IV

1

AT 603

Seminar in Evidence–Based Practice V

1

clinical examination and diagnosis (16 credits)

AT 530

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis I: Lower Extremity

3

AT 530L

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis I: Lower Extremity Lab

1

AT 540

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis II: Upper Extremity

3

AT 540L

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis II: Upper Extremity Lab

1

AT 570

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis III: Neurophysiology of Concussion

1

AT 670

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis IV: Head, Neck, and Spine

2

AT 670L

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis IV: Head, Neck and Spine Lab

1

AT 675

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis V: General Medical Conditions

3

AT 675L

Clinical Examination and Diagnosis V: General Medical Lab

1

therapeutic interventions (15 credits)

AT 505

Musculoskeletal Anatomy

2

AT 510

Emergency Management and Standards of Care in Athletic Training

2

AT 515

Introduction to Patient Care and Clinical Skills

1

AT 520

Therapeutic Interventions I: Modalities

2

AT 520L

Therapeutic Interventions I: Modalities Lab

1

AT 560

Therapeutic Interventions II: Manual Therapy

1

AT 560L

Therapeutic Interventions II: Manual Therapy Lab

1

AT 609

Therapeutic Interventions III: Foundations of Orthopedic Rehabilitation

1

AT 610

Therapeutic Interventions IV: Rehabilitative Exercise

2

AT 610L

Therapeutic Interventions IV: Rehabilitative Exercise Lab

1

AT 620

Therapeutic Interventions IV: Orthopedic Casting and Bracing

1

advancing professional practice (9 credits)

AT 665

Health and Psychosocial Strategies

3

AT 680

Leadership, Administration, and Ethics in Athletic Training

3

AT 685

Professional Topics in Athletic Training

3

clinical experiences (12 credits)

AT 550

Athletic Training Clinical Experience I

3

AT 551

Athletic Training Clinical Experience II

1

AT 552

Athletic Training Clinical Experience III

2

AT 650

Athletic Training Clinical Experience IV

1

AT 651

Athletic Training Clinical Experience V

3

AT 652

Athletic Training Clinical Experience VI

2

total credits

 

60

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders with Speech Language Pathology Services Credential

The Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders program prepares students for clinical or supervisory positions in healthcare and education. It meets all the knowledge and skills required by the American Speech Language Hearing Associations (ASHA) and was granted accreditation in 2013 by the Council of Academic Accreditations of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Programs. Through skillful faculty leadership, mentoring and individualized instruction, students develop competency as speech–language pathologists prepared to assess and treat children and adults with mild to severe communication disorders and disabilities such as stuttering, hearing loss, deafness, cleft palate, articulation disorders, voice abnormalities, stroke, progressive neurological disorders and traumatic brain injury.

Candidates learn to counsel spouses, families, siblings and educators on how to work with children and adults who use hearing aids, augmentative and alternative communication systems and other assistive technology to communicate.

The program is based on research, theory and field experience courses, 400 clinical clock hours of practicum, fieldwork and intern programs. Candidates provide assessment and treatment for persons with communication disorders from birth through adulthood during supervised off–site clinical practicum. Candidates may be placed in hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation agencies, private practice or schools for this practicum.

Graduates will be eligible for a Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) by the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association (ASHA), a California Services credential in speech/language pathology and a California state license in speech language pathology.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Application to the Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders program, using the national CSDCAS form.
  2. Undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders or the post baccalaureate equivalent (leveling courses).
  3. Official transcripts from the baccalaureate degree granting institution.
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores taken within the last five years.
  5. Three letters of recommendation, including one from an academic source, which describe the applicant's professional and academic abilities.
  6. A personal essay that will be used to assess the applicant's writing skills, career commitment and professional goals.
  7. After initial screening of the application materials, selected prospective students will be invited for an in–person interview with faculty.

Transfer of coursework

With department chair approval. Due to the cohort model used, transfers are not encouraged.

Demonstration of mastery

Mastery is determined by:

  1. Passing grades of "B" or higher in all academic courses.
  2. Completion of a minimum of 400 clinical clock hours of supervised practicum across the lifespan.
  3. Completion of capstone course which includes comprehensive exams, an approved project or a thesis.
  4. Recommendation by the department chair to apply for the California services credential, the state license, and passing score on the National Praxis Exam.

Public School Credential Program

Chapman University has been approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) to offer the Speech Language Pathology Services Credential within Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences in collaboration with the services of the Credential Analyst in the College of Educational Studies.

Title II Compliance

Chapman University, Crean College of Behavioral and Health Sciences complies with all federal government reporting requirements pursuant to Section 207 of the Higher Education Act passed by Congress in 1998. Please see our website www.chapman.edu/crean for complete information.

Practicum Assignment: Speech Language Pathology

Applications for practicum assignment must be filed with the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences at the beginning of trimester/term prior to the one in which a student plans to enroll in practicum.

Students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders have six practicum courses – the first one is observation as preparation for all of the following five courses. Typically students have two assignments per trimester, which match the courses they have completed or are taking simultaneously. The sequence of courses is designed to logically follow the acquisition of new knowledge in each of the KASA areas and gradually increase responsibilities of the SLP in school and healthcare settings.

  1. The Clinical Coordinator makes all of the assignments and meets individually with each student to explain the field–work assignment, commitment and hours.
  2. Students are assigned to 3 or 4 days per week – six hours per day.
  3. CSD 620, 630, 640 are all specifically focused on school practicum skills.
  4. CSD 610 introduces both education and healthcare settings.
  5. A specific number of hours is required for each public school placement as follows:
    1. CSD 610 – Observation in the schools – minimum of 10 hours
    2. CSD 620 – 45 hours
    3. CSD 630 – 38 hours
    4. CSD 640 – 105 hours
  6. All students are supervised by two SLPs.
    1. The on–site SLP 1:1 supervision daily.
    2. The Practicum SLP – Minimum of two visits per trimester.
    3. All hours are collected in CALIPSO – A software program for ASHA clinical hours adjusted to fit the curriculum of the University.
  7. All supervisors must hold a CA SLP Services Credential, CCC and/or a CA state license in speech language pathology.
  8. SLP Interns are evaluated using the CALIPSO rating scale at midterm and final week of practicum, in each trimester.

Student Appeal Process

Each student has the right of academic appeal. Appeal should first be made to the department chair of the Communication Sciences and Disorders credential program. Further appeal may be made to the dean of the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences and then to the director of program assessment improvement committee. There is no appeal beyond the Office of the Provost.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

requirements

CSD 500

Research Methods

3

CSD 501

Articulation and Phonology

3

CSD 502

Clinical Procedures and Professional Issues

3

CSD 503

Language Disorders in Children

3

CSD 504

Fluency

3

CSD 505

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Early Childhood Assessment

3

CSD 506

Neuroanatomy

3

CSD 507

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Cognitive Aspects of Communication

3

CSD 508

Diagnostics and Assessment

3

CSD 509

School–Based Issues

3

CSD 510

Adult Language Disorders

3

CSD 511

Disorders of Swallowing/Dysphagia

3

CSD 512

Multicultural and Second Language Acquisition

3

CSD 513

Voice, Resonance, and Craniofacial Disorders

3

CSD 514

Motor Speech Disorders

3

CSD 515

Advanced Audiology

3

CSD 516

Counseling

3

CSD 610

Observation

1

CSD 620

Clinical Practicum

1

CSD 630

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 640

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 650

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 660

Clinical Practicum

1

CSD 698

Capstone (thesis or project and comprehensive exam)

1

total credits

 

64

Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Studies

The M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies program signifies that the graduate is prepared for entry into the practice of medicine. It shows that the graduate must have the skills and knowledge to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care. It is essential for good patient care to require minimum standards for the education of the physician assistant.

Candidates for the M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies must possess the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze and synthesize data. They must have functional use of the senses of vision, hearing, equilibrium and taste. Their exteroceptor (touch, pain and temperature) and proprioceptor (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis and vibratory) senses must be sufficiently intact to enable them to carry out all the activities required to complete the activities described below. Candidates must have sufficient motor function capabilities to meet the demands of the physician assistant studies program and the demands of total patient care. They must be able to complete the didactic and clinical curriculum in its entirety. The candidate must possess ability, aptitude and skills in five areas: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, behavioral and social.

Accreditation standards require that admission criteria into a physician assistant studies program are established by the program's faculty, but must include technical standards for admission developed by the accrediting agency, the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC–PA).

In the admission process, the university must judge not only the scholastic accomplishments and potential of the applicant, but also consider the applicant's current physical and emotional status, cumulative and progressive disability and drug–induced impairments that may pose obstacles to the safe application of the student's knowledge and skill or prevent effective interaction with patients and co–workers.

In accordance with university policy and as delineated by Federal and California law, the university does not discriminate in admission, educational programs or employment against any individual on the basis of that individual's handicap or disability and will make good faith efforts at providing reasonable accommodation as required.

Application process

Application period is April 22 to October 1, 2016. Applications will not be accepted after October 1, 2016.

Submit your application and supporting documents to the Centralized Application System for Physician Assistants (CASPA) on or before October 1, 2016. Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications and supporting documents as early as possible. Applicants are responsible for following up with CASPA to ensure all necessary documents are received. After CASPA confirms receipt of all necessary documents and completes the application, students must forward any updated transcripts for courses in progress at the time of application to the Office of Graduate Admission.

The supporting documents include:

Admission requirements

Admission to the M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies is competitive and multifaceted. Our selection process is based on a combination of your graduate application, academic performance (GPA and GRE), letters of recommendation, patient contact hours, shadowing hours, personal statement of intent and performance during an in–person interview if invited.

Admission to the Physician Assistant Studies program requires the applicant to complete the required prerequisite coursework and admission requirements listed below.

  1. Completion of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college prior to matriculation into the Chapman University M.M.S. PA Studies program.
  2. Completion of all prerequisite coursework with a “C” or better.
  3. Overall cumulative GPA minimum 3.200.
  4. Cumulative science prerequisite GPA minimum 3.200.
  5. The minimum scores for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Verbal 150; Quantitative 150; Writing 4.5. The GRE must be completed within the last five years from the application deadline. A combination of the highest scores from separate sittings of the GRE exam will be accepted. Chapman University’s institution code is 3681. A department code is not needed.
  6. TOEFL score must meet minimum standard requirement of 80 if English is not the first language.
  7. Technical Standards: Qualified applicants must have abilities and skills in the following areas: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, conceptual, integrative, qualitative and behavior/social.
  8. Three letters of recommendation (one must be from a practicing PA or physician).
  9. 1,000 hours of patient contact in a health care related work experience, voluntary or paid; click here to view the approved patient contact list.
  10. Observation/shadowing experience with a licensed and practicing PA, MD or DO is preferred. Shadowing hours will not count towards the 1000 required patient contact hours. Applicants must enter any shadowing experience and the healthcare related area of the official CASPA application. Observational experiences to be arranged by the student. The PA Studies program will not arrange nor recommend observational sites. Please check the following website on shadowing: www.capanet.org/Students_Pre-PA/Information-on-Shadowing/. Clinical work experience as well as any formal health career training (EMT, CAN, LVN, RN, RT, PT, MT, etc.) cannot be substituted for observational/shadowing hours.
  11. Personal statement/Narrative: Please describe your motivation towards becoming a PA. 5000 characters limit = approximately 625 words.
  12. Personal interview: After initial assessment and screening of applications, selected candidates will be invited to interview on campus in Irvine, CA.
  13. Background check: successful completion.
  14. Due to new government regulations, we are unable to accept international students into this program at this time. We hope to be able to accept students for the next academic year. We apologize for any inconvenience and look forward to receiving international student applications at that time. If you have any questions, please contact intladmit@chapman.edu.

Persons who have been dismissed from another physician assistant studies program are not eligible for consideration for admission to Chapman University's M.M.S. in Physician Assistant Studies.

Prerequisite coursework

All prerequisite coursework must be obtained from an accredited college or university with a grade of “C” or better.

basic sciences

Human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, biology, microbiology and genetics may not be taken by an online or correspondence format.

Human Anatomy with lab

4 credits

Physiology with lab

4 credits

or

Human Anatomy and Physiology with lab

8 credits

additional basic sciences

General Chemistry I with lab

4 credits

General Chemistry II with lab

4 credits

General Biology I with lab

4 credits

General Biology II with lab

4 credits

Microbiology with lab 

4 credits

Genetics

2 credits

Medical Terminology

1 credit

general

English Composition 

3 credits

General Psychology

3 credits

Introduction to Sociology

3 credits

Introduction to Statistics

3 credits

Pre–Calculus or Calculus

3 credits

recommended courses

Medical Ethics

Medical Spanish

Requirements for the Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Studies

The following credits must be completed for degree conferral. (The curriculum is subject to change and students will be notified by the department.)

requirements (70 credits)

PAS 500

Principles of Medical Science

3

PAS 501

History and Physical Diagnosis

4

PAS 502

Human Anatomy with Lab

4

PAS 503

Evidence Based Medicine

2

PAS 504

Pharmacology

4

PAS 505

Inter–Professional Education

2

PAS 506

PA Professional Practice I

2

PAS 507

EENT

3

PAS 510

Cardiology

5

PAS 511

Pulmonology

4

PAS 512

Gastroenterology

3

PAS 513

Genitourinary

2

PAS 514

Endocrinology

2

PAS 515

Hematology

1

PAS 516

PA Professional Practice II

2

PAS 517

Dermatology

2

PAS 518

Mental and Behavioral Health

2

PAS 520

Emergency Medicine

2

PAS 521

Clinical Skills

2

PAS 522

Neurology

2

PAS 523

Orthopedics/Rheumatology

3

PAS 524

Women's Health

3

PAS 525

Ethics in PA Practice

2

PAS 526

ID and Immunology

2

PAS 527

Pediatrics

2

PAS 528

Geriatrics

2

PAS 530

Fundamentals of Surgery

2

PAS 531

Research Methods and Design

1

supervised clinical experience requirements (45 credits)

PAS 601

Family Medicine

5

PAS 602

Internal Medicine – Inpatient

5

PAS 603

Internal Medicine – Outpatient

5

PAS 604

Women's Health and OB–GYN

5

PAS 605

Emergency Medicine

5

PAS 606

General Surgery

5

PAS 607

Mental and Behavioral Health

5

PAS 608

Pediatrics

5

PAS 609

Elective

5

capstone requirements (4 credits)

PAS 697

Graduate Project I

2

PAS 698

Graduate Project II

2

total credits

 

119

clinical experiences

The student must satisfactorily complete the clinical experiences in semesters IV, V and VI and one elective.

Course Descriptions – Athletic Training

AT 501 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice I: Foundations of EBP

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Introduction to concepts of evidence based-practice and the importance of advancing knowledge in the Athletic Training profession. The student will search for the best evidence and begin to critically analyze the evidence in a systematic manner as it relates to patient outcomes and clinical questions. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

AT 502 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice II: Research Design and Biostatistics

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Application of the concept of evidence based-practice by utilizing biostatistics in evaluating quality of evidence as it relates to patient outcomes and clinical questions. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 505 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This course on human anatomy builds upon prerequisite course work to provide a strong foundation in musculoskeletal anatomy for the athletic training student. The musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems are emphasized and include a focus on bones, muscles, joints, ligaments, cartilage, and bursae of the upper and lower extremities. Application of knowledge is focused on palpation of structures as it relates to clinical examination techniques. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

AT 510 Emergency Management and Standards of Care in Athletic Training

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This course focuses on the acute care and prevention of injuries and illnesses common in athletic training. Students will recognize, differentiate, and demonstrate intervention strategies for a variety of catastrophic and emergent conditions based on evidence and standards of care established within the athletic training profession. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

AT 515 Introduction to Patient Care and Clinical Skills

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Introduction to clinical skills utilized to provide successful patient-care in healthcare settings. Practical application of documentation, taping and wrapping for extremities, stretching, therapeutic modalities, equipment fitting, basic care for acute injuries, and basic concussion evaluation methods. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 520 Therapeutic Interventions I: Modalities

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 520L. An evidence-based approach to therapeutic modalities including tissue healing, cryotherapy, superficial thermotherapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, diathermy and mechanical modalities are studied. Special consideration identifies appropriate modalities for various stages of injury management. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credit.

AT 520L Therapeutic Interventions I: Modalities Lab

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 520. An evidence-based approach to the application and assessment of students’ skills related to therapeutic modalities including cryotherapy, superficial thermotherapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and mechanical modalities. Special consideration identifies appropriate documentation of patient-related outcomes. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 530 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis I: Lower Extremity

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Corequisite AT 530L. This course covers functional anatomy, pathology and clinical diagnosis of musculoskeletal injuries of the lower extremity including foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh and hip. A focus on documentation, differential diagnosis and the appropriate use of evidence to guide the students’ evaluation will occur. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

AT 530L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis I: Lower Extremity Lab

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 530. This lab course emphasizes the instruction and assessment of hands-on clinical skills related to lower extremity injury evaluation of the patient. A focus on a one-to-one student to instructor interaction in the assessment of skills and case studies to facilitate critical-thinking and documentation skills of students will occur in this course. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 540 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis II: Upper Extremity

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 540L. This course covers functional anatomy, pathology and clinical diagnosis of musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity including glenohumeral, scapulothoracic, elbow, wrist, hand and finger. A focus on documentation, differential diagnosis and the appropriate use of evidence to guide the students’ evaluation will occur. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 540L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis II: Upper Extremity Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 540. This lab course emphasizes the instruction and assessment of hands-on clinical skills related to upper extremity injury evaluation of the patient. A focus on a one-to-one student to instructor interaction in the assessment of skills and case studies to facilitate critical-thinking and documentation skills of students will occur in this course. Fee: $100. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 550 Athletic Training Clinical Experience I

Prerequisite, athletic training major. An introduction to clinical education experiences in the athletic training program. Includes basic application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also develop professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 551 Athletic Training Clinical Experience II

Prerequisite, athletic training major. An intermediate clinical education experience in the athletic training program. Includes intermediate application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also practice professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 552 Athletic Training Clinical Experience III

Prerequisite, athletic training major. An intermediate clinical education experience in the Athletic Training program. Includes intermediate application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also practice professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

AT 560 Therapeutic Interventions II: Manual Therapy

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Instruction of manual therapy techniques used in the athletic training clinical setting. Students will learn how to select and apply manual therapy techniques to patients. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 560L Therapeutic Interventions II: Manual Therapy Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Instruction of manual therapy techniques used in the athletic training clinical setting. Students will learn how to select and apply manual therapy techniques to patients. Fee: $100. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 565 Health and Psychosocial Strategies

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. This course enables the student to educate patients about their overall health and mental wellness strategies across the lifespan. A focus on the role of exercise and nutrition both before and after injury along with psychosocial strategies needed to assist patients who may exhibit a variety of mental health disorders. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 570 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis III: Neurophysiology of Concussion

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This course covers neurological anatomy, physiology and clinical diagnosis of concussions. A focus on the validity of baselines and sideline concussion assessments, documentation, differential diagnosis and the appropriate use of evidence to guide the students’ evaluation will occur. (Offered interterm.) 1 credit.

AT 601 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice III

Prerequisite, athletic training major. The first in a series of three seminars designed to assist graduate athletic training students with the application and implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care. Critical analysis of evidence will be utilized to evaluate current patient-care practices as it relates to the domains of athletic training. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 602 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice IV

Prerequisite, athletic training major. The second in a series of three seminars designed to assist graduate athletic training students with the application and implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care. Critical analysis of evidence will be utilized to evaluate current patient-care practices as it relates to the domains of athletic training. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 603 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice V

Prerequisite, athletic training major. The third in a series of three seminars designed to assist graduate athletic training students with the application and implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care. Critical analysis of evidence will be utilized to evaluate current patient-care practices as it relates to the domains of athletic training. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 604 Clinical Research Project IV: Collecting Data and Evaluating the Findings

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This purpose of this fourth course in the clinical research project series is to provide graduate athletic training student with close advising to collect and analyze data, write the bulk of the results section, and prepare the student for completion of the research manuscript and dissemination of the findings in the final course. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

AT 605 Clinical Research Project V: Completing and Disseminating the Findings

Prerequisite, athletic training major. The purpose of this final course in the clinical research project series is to provide the graduate athletic training student with knowledge and skills needed to successfully complete the research manuscript and disseminate the findings through a poster or oral presentation. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 609 Therapeutic Interventions III: Foundations of Orthopedic Rehabilitation

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Athletic training students learn the foundations of orthopedic rehabilitation, including tissue injury and healing, appropriate documentation, regaining range of motion and flexibility, the role of posture and joint mechanics, and principles of strength training. This course prepares students to use these principles to develop rehabilitation programs in the following course. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 610 Therapeutic Interventions IV: Rehabilitative Exercise

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 610L. Instructs athletic training students how to develop evidence-based comprehensive individualized rehabilitation programs. Course topics include the determination of therapeutic goals and objectives, selection of therapeutic exercises, methods of evaluating and recording rehabilitation progress and development of criteria for progression and return to normal function. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

AT 610L Therapeutic Interventions IV: Rehabilitative Exercise Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 610. Application of rehabilitative exercise concepts in the laboratory setting. Students will develop and execute rehabilitation programs, including determination of therapeutic goals and objectives, selection of therapeutic exercises, methods of evaluating and recording rehabilitation progress and development of criteria for progression and return to normal function. Fee: $100. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 620 Therapeutic Interventions IV: Orthopedic Casting and Bracing

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This course allows the student to be eligible to take the certification exams to become an Orthopedic Brace Technologist (OBT) and a Registered Orthopedic Technologist (ROT). This course includes an intensive hands-on experience that will involve both instruction and practical application. Selection, application and removal of orthopedic casting for both upper and lower extremity disorders are addressed. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 650 Athletic Training Clinical Experience IV

Prerequisite, athletic training major. A clinical education experience in the athletic training program focused on observation of and interactions with patients in general medical and rehabilitation clinic settings. Students will demonstrate professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with healthcare professionals such as physicians, physical therapists, and physician assistants. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 651 Athletic Training Clinical Experience V

Prerequisite, athletic training major. An advanced clinical education experience in the athletic training program. Includes advanced application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also demonstrate professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 652 Athletic Training Clinical Experience VI

Prerequisite, athletic training major. An advanced clinical education experience in the athletic training program. Includes advanced application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also demonstrate professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

AT 665 Health and Psychosocial Strategies

Prerequisite, athletic training major. This course enables the student to educate patients about their overall health and mental wellness strategies across the lifespan. A focus on the role of exercise and nutrition both before and after injury along with psychosocial strategies needed to assist patients who may exhibit a variety of mental health disorders. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

AT 670 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis IV: Head, Neck, and Spine

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 670L. This course covers functional anatomy, pathology and clinical diagnosis of musculoskeletal and neurological injuries of the head (including traumatic brain injury), cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. A focus on documentation, differential diagnosis and the appropriate use of evidence to guide the students’ evaluation will occur. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

AT 670L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis IV: Head, Neck, and Spine Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 670. This lab course emphasizes the instruction and assessment of hands-on clinical skills related to musculoskeletal and neurological injuries of the head (including traumatic brain injury), cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. A focus on a one-to-one student to instructor interaction in the assessment of skills and case studies to facilitate critical-thinking and documentation skills of students will occur in this course. Fee: $100. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

AT 675 Clinical Examination and Diagnosis V: General Medical Conditions

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 675L. Advanced athletic training techniques including medical terminology, clinical examination and diagnosis with an emphasis on illnesses and injuries to the face, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Additional study will include assessment and treatment of exertional heat illness and other causes of sudden death in physically active patients. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

AT 675L Clinical Examination and Diagnosis V: General Medical Lab

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Corequisite, AT 675. Demonstration, practice, and evaluation of advanced athletic training techniques of clinical examination and diagnosis of General Medical Conditions with an emphasis on illnesses and injuries to the face, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Additional study will include assessment and treatment of exertional heat illness and other causes of sudden death in physically active patients. Fee: $100. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 680 Leadership, Administration, and Ethics in Athletic Training

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Advanced athletic training concepts related to professional leadership, risk management, health care administration, and ethical/legal approach to patient care and facility operation. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

AT 685 Professional Topics in Athletic Training

Prerequisite, athletic training major. Facilitate transition to clinical practice by promoting critical thinking skills, problem solving, and the team approach to health care. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Communication Sciences and Disorders

CSD 500 Research Methods

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Research methods, design, analysis within evidence-based-practice. Evaluate research studies in communication sciences and disorders; apply results of research-based intervention in practice of speech-language pathology. Understand roles as evaluators and consumers of research, learn to critically read literature, apply findings, and identify own research to advance science. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 501 Articulation and Phonology

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth study of normal development of articulation/phonology, the nature and causes of abnormal articulation/phonology, and the assessment and treatment of these processes. Student develops skills in phonetic transcription of errors, administration and evaluation of articulation test results, and planning treatment procedures. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 502 Clinical Procedures and Professional Issues

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Develop an understanding of the clinical process, clinical terminology, reviewing files, reviewing general disorder areas, understanding communication abilities of clients, positive and negative clinician traits, writing behavioral objectives, teaching and treatment techniques, data collection and analysis, and preparing for first clinical experience. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 503 Language Disorders in Children

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Disorders of language in children ages 3-21; impact on academic performance, high and low incidence disorders; prevention, screening, assessment, identification, and treatment. Principles/techniques of assessment, intervention focus on the periods of emergent language, language for learning, advanced adolescent language, integrated with students’ clinical practicum. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 504 Fluency

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies detailed information regarding stuttering and fluency disorders in children and adults. Theories of stuttering will be reviewed, culminating in demonstrations of assessment and treatment of disfluency and stuttering, cluttering behaviors that interfere with communication in school or work behaviors and cause emotional stress. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 505 Autism Spectrum Disorders and Early Childhood Assessment

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis, etiologies, and characteristics across the lifespan. Topics will include current, controversial, traditional treatments: applied behavior analysis, theory of mind, weak central coherence, "Extreme Male" theory, biomedical issues, special diets, chelation, and Pivotal Response Theory. Also includes early childhood assessment critical to diagnosis and intervention. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 506 Neuroanatomy

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course provides detailed information regarding the peripheral and central nervous systems as they relate to normal speech and voice production, language, cognition and swallowing. Students will gain an increased awareness of neuropathologies that contribute to neurogenic communication disorders and dysphagia. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 507 Augumentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Cognitive Aspects of Communication

Prerequisite, CSD major. Course studies include augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), related assistive technology used to aid individuals with complex communication needs (e.g., severe physical impairments, sensory impairments, severe communication disorders, etc.); impact of cognitive, educational, physical, psychosocial, and linguistic aspects of human behavior on AAC use, assessment, intervention, research issues. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 508 Diagnostics and Assessment

Prerequisites, CSD major, satisfactory completion of clinical observation and enrolled in the first clinical placement. Art and science of diagnostic assessment; knowledge/skills to assess communication disorders across the lifespan; interpret assessment findings, communicate results. Test development/measurement validity, reliability, standardized scores. Active test administration; combine case history assessment information to develop client profiles leading to diagnosis, recommendation, treatment goals. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 509 School-Based Issues

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies issues experienced in the educational system where many speech language pathologists work, including understanding/appreciation of varying processes/procedures, Legislative foundations, referral/assessment process, Student Study Team, IEP process, RTI, service delivery options, state curriculum standards, specialized services, review of SLP role in public school. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 510 Adult Language Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD major. Detailed information regarding acquired speech, language and cognitive-communicative disorders, and the neurological conditions that cause them. Students will become familiar with procedures for assessment, treatment, and management of patients in locations ranging from the intensive care unit to outpatient services. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 511 Disorders of Swallowing/Dysphagia

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the normal swallow in children and adults. Neurological and oncologic disorders which affects the swallowing process. Evaluation of the patient with dysphagia includes clinical and instrumental analysis. Treatment plans based on history and evaluation results will be designed and examined. Historical and current research and its effects upon the assessment and management of swallowing disorders. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 512 Multicultural and Second Language Acquisition

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Current theories on language acquisition and practical application pertaining to culturally and linguistically diverse persons with communication disabilities. Develop cultural competence in assessment, intervention, and family/community interactions; support successful school and healthcare experiences across lifespan; will address use of interpreters and community resources for language difference, disorder, and disability. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 513 Voice, Resonance, and Craniofacial Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth-study of etiology, interdisciplinary assessment, remediation of communicative impairments in children, and adults with craniofacial anomalies. Etiological factors and methodology for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of functional and organic disorders of voice across the lifespan and in diverse populations. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 514 Motor Speech Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD 506. In-depth study of motor speech disorders in children/adults resulting from developmental, acquired and progressive conditions caused by damage to the central and peripheral nervous system. Neurological bases of speech production; detailed information regarding general speech characteristics found in apraxia of speech and dysarthrias. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 515 Advanced Audiology

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course is designed for the speech-language pathologist to understand the clinical procedures in audiology. The course will be divided into three major sections: 1) anatomy, physiology, and disorders of the ear, 2) amplification and prosthetics in audiology and audiologic rehabilitation, 3) special issues in audiology such as Auditory Processing Disorders (APD), counseling issues, and educational audiology. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 516 Counseling

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course will introduce students to the counseling skills needed by speech-language pathologists in their daily interactions with clients/patients and their families. A broad overview of counseling theories and techniques will be provided, with an emphasis throughout the course on "positive psychology" and a wellness perspective. Students will understand the emotional needs of individuals with communication disorders and their families and how communication disorders affect the family system. Counseling needs of individuals with specific disorders will be discussed, including those with fluency disorders, autism spectrum disorders, hearing loss, acquired/adult language and cognitive disorders, and congenital disorders. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 610 Observation

Prerequisite, communication sciences and disorders major. Students will complete a minimum of 25 hours of observation required by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) in preparation for speech language, hearing assessment and intervention with culturally/linguistically diverse populations across the life-span. Professional practice and ethical issues in SLP settings include hospitals, schools, clinics, skilled-nursing facilities, homes. One-time Student Practicum Fee: $700. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

CSD 620 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, communication sciences and disorders major. Students will acquire 45 hours of clinical experience in both assessment and intervention in the areas of phonology, language disorders of children, fluency, and autism spectrum disorders. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations across the life-span in a variety of settings. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

CSD 630 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, CSD majors only. Students will acquire 45 hours of clinical experience in patient counseling, diagnostics, assessment, intervention for individuals with cognitive impairment and those who use, or are candidates for AAC devices. Clinical contact with culturally/linguistically diverse populations across the life-span in a variety of settings. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 640 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, CSD major. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in a school-based speech and language services setting. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 650 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, 640, CSD majors only. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in health-care/medical setting. Clinical contact will include specialty areas of dysphagia and motor speech disorders with linguistically and culturally diverse populations. CSD 650 may include a paid clinical internship in a health-care setting. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 660 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, 640, 650, CSD major only, consent of instructor. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in paid externship in health-care or school setting. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations. Students in CSD 660 may focus on a specialty area: voice, cranio-facial disorders, cognitive disabilities. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

CSD 670 Directed Research Experience

Prerequisites, CSD 500, graduate standing, communication sciences and disorders major, consent of instructor, and completed HIPPA and/or CITI training. Graduate students in CSD will learn how to engage in research activities including but not be limited to investigating the identification, assessment, management and treatment of communication differences and disorders. Activities can include reviewing the literature and generating measurable hypotheses, completing human subjects applications for institutional review, recruiting research participants, collecting and managing data, and analyzing data. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 0 credits.

CSD 698 Capstone

Prerequisites, CSD major, consent of instructor, all coursework in CSD, plus a completed program evaluation for MS degree. Students write a thesis or project, take the comprehensive exam and prepare for national praxis exam in speech language pathology. Successful completion of this course results in program director recommendation for speech language pathology preliminary SLP service credential, clinical fellowship year (CF), required professional experience (RPE), national praxis examination. Fee for comprehensive exam. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

Prerequisite Courses – Marriage and Family Therapy

PSY 203 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, MATH 104, proficiency in pre-calculus mathematics as evidenced by the appropriate placement exam score available through the Department of Mathematics. The course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, the rationale of hypothesis testing, a survey of the common parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, and the calculation and interpretation of statistical indices and applications. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 204 Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, or equivalents with consent of instructor. An introduction to the principles and procedures involved in behavioral sciences research emphasizing the scientific method and its application to psychological inquiry. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

PSY 310 Psychology of Learning

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An examination of the theoretical and methodological foundations of human learning. Emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the major learning paradigms and on the application of learning principles. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 317 Cognitive Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Examines the neural basis for cognition beginning with attention and spans the breadth of cognitive processes to include memory, learning, language, reasoning, and problem solving. Students learn how our minds absorb, store, and manipulate information from the world to solve problems, make decisions, comprehend language, produce art, and laugh at jokes. Students are encouraged to think critically and develop questions about their own cognitive processes. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 322 Theories of Personality

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An evaluative review of the major theories of personality. Emphasis is placed on personality structure, dynamics, behavior, and development of the normal and abnormal personality. Theories include psychodynamic, cognitive, somatic, behavioral, social learning, and humanistic explanations for human behavior and their differential implications for psychology. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 323 Child Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101, psychology major. This course is for psychology majors and covers the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains of development from conception through adolescence. The course consists of a lecture and a laboratory component. Lectures introduce major theories and research strategies in child development and integrates applied aspects such as parenting and teaching children. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 327 Life Span Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major theories, concepts, and research methods in life–span developmental psychology. Students will learn to understand cognitive, emotional, and social development and changes across the entire life span from infancy to late adulthood. This course examines the biological and environmental foundations of development including cross–cultural issues and highlights empirical research to integrate theoretical and applied perspectives. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 328 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An overview of the field of abnormal psychology, which is the application of methods, principles, and findings from psychological research to understand, classify, and treat “abnormal” behavior and psychologically–based human suffering. Topics of lectures, discussions, and video presentations provide an integrative overview of current approaches to classification, assessment, and treatment of psychological disorders and mental illness. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 330 Child Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisites, PSY 101, and either 323, 326, or 327, or concurrent enrollment. This course reviews the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological and development disorders in children and adolescents. This course is likely to benefit all students who are interested in interacting with children and adolescents, as well as students considering careers involving children and youth with emotional and behavioral problems. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 333 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An investigation of the relationship between brain and behavior. Students will study the structure and function of the nervous system, including the biological bases of psychopathology and normal function. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 336 Social Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the scientific study of how groups and individuals interact. Cognition, feelings, impressions, and attitudes influence and are influenced by the presence of others according to the precepts of Social Psychology. Topics include manipulation and influence tactics, persuasion, attraction, aggression, altruism, self–concept, stereotypes, and cognition and behavioral congruence. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 432 Introduction to Psychological Assessment

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203. Concurrent enrollment of PSY 203, with consent of instructor. An introduction to test construction, standardization, validity, reliability. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of intelligence, interests, values, and personality in normal and challenged persons. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Marriage and Family Therapy

Graduate standing is required for all 500 and 600 level courses.

MFT 516 Assessment of Individuals and Families

Prerequisites, MFT 570, or concurrent enrollment, and marriage and family therapy major. A study of the clinical application of well researched and scientifically-based psychological assessment instruments and processes designed specifically for marriage and family therapy practice. Content includes clinical interviewing, administration and interpretation of objective measures of family/marital dynamics, cognitive functioning, personality, psychopathology and the writing of intake summaries and assessment-based treatment plans. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

MFT 532 Research and Bibliographic Methods

This course examines essential issues in bibliographic search, research design and methodology relevant to marriage and family therapy research. Students are exposed to quantitative and qualitative approaches with a focus on developing critical evaluative skills when examining theoretical, assessment-focused, and treatment outcome research. Clinical practice implications of contemporary studies are examined through student presentations, discussion groups, and papers. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 533 Psychopharmacology for Marriage and Family Therapists

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. This course presents a brief overview of diagnostic interviewing and applying DSM-5 diagnostic criteria to mental disorders in order to select psychopharmacological interventions that will benefit the MFT’s client. Topics discussed will include differential diagnosis of medical, substance induced, and primary psychiatric disorders, cultural views of mental disorders, coordinating efforts between psychotherapist and physician prescriber, and finding prescribers with expertise in psychiatric medications. Side effects, benign and dangerous, will be discussed as well as appropriate dose, duration, and expected time of drug response. The role of psychosocial recovery models integrating medication, psychotherapy, and socialization/education approaches will be discussed. The course will include faculty lectures on core topics such as CNS function (e.g. neurotransmitters), schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, panic, OCD, substance use disorders and their medication treatment. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

MFT 541 Theories I

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. This course provides a survey of the major theoretical approaches from a systems perspective that are used with individuals, couples, families, and children in the practice of marriage and family therapy. Theories covered include psychodynamic, humanistic/experiential, cognitive-behavioral, family systems, and mindfulness-based therapies. The course provides an in-depth examination of these theories while examining how family-of-origin, gender, and culture impact family dynamics. Didactic and experiential modes of learning are used to deepen course material. Material from this course will prepare the student for the licensure as a marriage and family therapist in the state of California. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 556 Theories II

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. This course provides a continuation of the survey of the major theoretical approaches from a systems perspective that are used with individuals, couples, families and children in the practice of marriage and family therapy. Theories covered include Bowen family systems, structural, strategic, Milan family systems, gender sensitive, solution focus, narrative, collaborative language systems and integrative models. The course provides an in-depth examination of these theories while examining how family-of-origin, gender, and culture impact family dynamics. Didactic and experiential modes of learning are used to deepen course material. Material from this course will prepare the student for the licensure as a marriage and family therapist in the state of California. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 561 Couple Therapy

Couple difficulties are studied with particular emphasis placed on the unique assessment strategies necessary for conjoint evaluation and treatment. The course emphasizes emotionally focused couple therapy and other empirically supported treatment approaches. Gender, culture, sexual orientation, and social class are considered when discussing domestic violence, conceptualizing cases, creating treatment plans, and understanding the standards of practice for couple therapy. Instructor modeling and student role play demonstrations are used to facilitate learning. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 565 Diagnosis and Treatment of Children and Adolescents

An examination of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, with consideration of the major types of disturbances, etiologies, assessment techniques, cultural and socioeconomic implications, and treatment approaches with children and adolescents. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding diagnosis, case conceptualization, and treatment planning within a developmental and recovery-oriented care model. This course addresses issues in child abuse reporting and treatment for marriage and family therapists. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 570 Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis

Prerequisites, abnormal psychology course, or equivalent, and marriage and family therapy major. An examination of psychopathology and diagnosis based on the DSM-5 for purposes of record keeping as well as treatment planning and treatment selection for each major disorder within marriage and family therapist’s scope of practice. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 573 Crisis Management and Clinical Process

Prerequisites, MFT 541, 570, marriage and family therapy major. A professionally supervised experience designed to introduce students to the practice of marriage and family therapy in an on-site training clinic. Utilizing the principles of mental health recovery-oriented care, students learn a practical framework for gathering clinical information while understanding social and psychological implications of cultural and socioeconomic factors. Emphasis is on crisis management, including harm to self and others, trauma and issues of grief and loss. Materials will include actual paperwork from the Frances Smith Center for Individual and Family Therapy. Supervised role plays and video-taped practice sessions are used to help students learn sound therapy skills using a caring, humanistic approach. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 578 Ethical and Professional Issues for Marriage and Family Therapists

This course examines ethical, legal, and professional issues relevant to the practice of marriage and family therapy. Ethical and legal responsibilities are discussed within the context of relevant state laws/regulations, professional ethical codes and the importance of interdisciplinary cooperation across clinical settings. Instructor modeling and student role play exercises are used to develop ethical decision-making skills that address issues commonly seen in individual, couples, and family therapy. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 582 Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy majors. Students examine normal sexual functioning and common types of sexual dysfunctions from a relational and systemic perspective. Students learn counseling techniques effective in the development of satisfactory sexual functioning with particular emphasis given to gender, culture and social differences in human sexuality. The interaction between physiological, psychological and social-cultural variables associated with sexual behavior and gender are emphasized in the course. Considerations of research, theory, and the application of knowledge in the prevention and remediation of disorders related to human sexuality will be emphasized. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

MFT 583 Advanced Theoretical Applications

Prerequisites, MFT 541, 570. A comprehensive overview of integrative psychotherapy applied to work within recovery-oriented systems of care. The course applies a biopsychosocial systems framework to understand the major evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy including: humanist-existential; psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and post-modern. Topics of lectures and discussions include strength-based and systemically oriented assessment; diversity informed case conceptualization, goal setting, treatment planning; and the implementation of a variety of empirically supported interventions applied to unique individuals from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. Video demonstrations and role play enhance student procedural learning, while case conceptualization and treatment planning are rehearsed using video and written vignettes from actual community mental health consumers. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 588 Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. An overview of current theoretical and clinical approaches to the diagnosis, and treatment of alcoholism, chemical dependency, co-occurring and addictive disorders. Using principles of recovery-oriented care, students review current research and program design from a family systems perspective with the goal of increasing professional awareness and skills in treating the chemically dependent family or individual. The models of substance use treatment, including twelve step programs, and other family systems approaches will be emphasized. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

MFT 595 Advanced Topics in Marriage and Family Therapy

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. An in-depth study of a particular topic in marriage and family therapy. May be repeated for credit in a different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MFT 605 Group Therapy

This course examines the dynamics of group psychotherapy and introduces students to the conceptual and practical application of techniques and interventions to the practice of group work in various therapeutic settings. Theories used in group practice along with components, process and stage development will be emphasized in the course. An understanding of cultural, social, psychological and socio-economics pertaining to group work will also be explored. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 610 Family Life Cycle and Aging

Prerequisite, MFT 556. This course provides an overview of human development across the life span from a family systems perspective. Theories related to the entire life span from conception through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging are reviewed with an emphasis on the impact of poverty, social class, and social insecurity on development. Focus is given to the impact of normative and non-normative life transitions in a family context . Emphasis is placed on a pluralistic understanding of families as described by cultural, family, and individual diversity. In-depth interviewing of one developmental stage is required. Perspectives on aging and end of life issues are discussed. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MFT 618 Multicultural Issues in Therapy

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. A study of multicultural counseling emphasizing understanding and respect for the diversity of human beings, particularly with regard to matters of race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, religion, sexual orientation and disability. The course analyzes the cultural context of family, behavior, psychopathology, assessment and counseling. Utilization of mental-health services by California specific ethnic/culture-specific groups are addressed. Critical analysis is given to ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, ableism and heterosexism in society and traditional culture-bound assessment and treatment approaches. The course objective is to produce culturally competent marriage and family therapists. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

MFT 620 Public Mental Health

An overview of the recovery model and recovery oriented mental health care practices in California public mental health. Students will learn the basic theoretical principles and practices of the recovery model. Course content includes case management, systems of care, public/private support and advocacy for working with the severely mentally ill, case management skills and community resources, disaster and trauma response counseling, and Motivational Interview techniques and collaborative treatment practices. Students will also have the opportunity to interface with consumers and families of consumers of mental health services during this course. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

MFT 675 Career Counseling

This course explores the role of career development issues as it affects the individual, couple and family. Course content includes exploration of models of career development, work-life issues, stages of life, multicultural issues and the interplay of these for the individual and their system. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MFT 689 Practicum II

Prerequisites, 12 credits of completed coursework, completion of site agreement, marriage and family therapy major. Provides clinical experience in groups and/or individually of the MFT degree candidates. It is intended as the final preparation for entry into a career in the mental health field at the masters level. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

MFT 690 Independent Internship

This internship will give students the opportunity to earn academic credit while gaining practical work experience in the discipline of Marriage and Family Therapy. Students will have an increased understanding of the discipline, learn job skills, increase self-confidence, and more. This course is not eligible to obtain hours towards licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist. This course is offered year round. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

MFT 694 Practicum I

Prerequisites, candidacy standing in the marriage and family therapy major, MFT 516, 541, 556, 561, 565, 570, 573, 578, 583, 618. Provides supervised clinical experience in groups and individually for MFT candidates. It is intended as the final preparation for entry into a career in the mental health field at the master's level. The course must be taken for three semesters. Graded. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $80. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

MFT 695 Advanced Topics in Counseling

An in-depth study of a particular topic in marriage and family therapy. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MFT 699 Individual Study

Prerequisite, marriage and family therapy major. Advanced supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Physical Therapy

PT 510 Functional Human Anatomy I

Corequisite, PT 510L. This course on human anatomy builds upon prerequisite coursework to provide a strong foundation in applied functional anatomy for the DPT student. The musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems are emphasized, but histology, radiology, and organ systems also are included. Lecture sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 510L Functional Human Anatomy I Laboratory

Corequisite, PT 510. This laboratory course on human anatomy builds upon prerequisite coursework to provide a strong foundation in applied functional anatomy for the DPT student. The musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems are emphasized, but histology, radiology, and organ systems also are included. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. Fee: $115. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

PT 511 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 511L. This course provides a foundational understanding of basic biomechanical principles emphasizing the biomechanics of human tissue and the body as a whole, together with methods of human motion analysis. The student will participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions that will include scientific evidence for support of biomechanical principles. Coursework is designed specifically for the DPT student and begins development of clinical judgment skills in motion analysis. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 511L Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 511. This laboratory course on applied human biomechanics builds upon requisite coursework to provide a strong foundation in applied functional biomechanics for the DPT student. Instrumentation (e.g., video analysis, GAITRite, electromyography, electrogoniometry) is emphasized, but theory with a focus on Newtonian physics also are included. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 512 Kinesiological Motion Analysis

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 510L, 511, 511L. Corequisite, PT 512L. This course further develops the students' understanding of human movement by applying biomechanical principles to individual joint mechanics both ideal and pathological, and by observational analysis of human motion including gait. The student will participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions that provide scientific evidence of joint mobility and results of motion deviations. Coursework is designed specifically for the DPT student and continues development of clinical judgment skills while integrating personal and cultural values and skills. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 512L Kinesiology Lab

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 510L, 511, PT 511L. Corequisite, PT 512. This laboratory course on applied kinesiology builds upon requisite coursework to provide a strong foundation in applied functional human movement for the DPT student. Applied functional anatomy, with a focus on joint architecture, muscle function, and neuromuscular integration of movement effectiveness and efficiency is emphasized. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 513 Developmental Anatomy

A lecture course on human developmental anatomy, with an emphasis on the normal development of the systems of the body. Selected congenital anomalies and the mechanisms underlying them will also be presented. Students are required to integrate material from this course with that from their prerequisite course work and related course content across the Physical Therapy curriculum. Students must also think critically, solve problems, and assess the relevant scientific literature as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 521 Applied Neurophysiology

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L. Corequisites, PT 523, 523L. This course is designed to provide the DPT student with a foundational understanding of the normal excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms of the nervous system. The student will participate in both lecture and discussion that will include the scientific evidence for neurological principles. Clinical applications, problem-solving, and critical thinking are emphasized. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 522 Functional Human Neuroanatomy I

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 525, with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite, PT 522L. This course covers the normal structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the central nervous system. Selected case studies of pathological conditions of the nervous system are presented. Students participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions (PT 522L) that require them to think critically and apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

PT 522L Functional Human Neuroanatomy I Laboratory

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 525, with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite, PT 522. This course covers the normal structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the central nervous system. Selected case studies of pathological conditions of the nervous system are presented. Students participate in interactive laboratory sessions that require them to think critically and apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios. (Offered as needed.) ½ credit.

PT 523 Functional Human Neuroanatomy II

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L. Corequisite, PT 523L. After gaining an understanding of the relationships between structure and function in the nervous system, students will focus on the inter-relationships between the various systems. Clinical reasoning and problem solving are facilitated through case studies, clinical scenarios, and discussing the current literature. (Offered as needed.) 2½ credits.

PT 523L Functional Human Neuroanatomy II Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L with a grade of C or better. Corequisite, PT 523. This course builds upon the foundation established in PT 522. After gaining an understanding of the relationships between structure and function in the nervous system, students will focus on the inter-relationships between the various systems. Clinical reasoning and problem solving are facilitated through case studies, clinical scenarios, and discussing the current literature. (Offered as needed.) ½ credit.

PT 525 Clinical Pathophysiology: General Medicine

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 525L. This course provides a foundational understanding of human physiology and pathology, emphasizing general medicine diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. The course integrates relevant aspects of biochemistry and neurophysiology, epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical and pharmacological management, and implications and indications for physical therapy. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 525L Clinical Pathophysiology Lab

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 525. This laboratory course will provide the opportunity to apply and examine pathophysiological processes related to physical therapist practice. Fee: $90. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 526 Clinical Pathology: Orthopedic

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 525, 525L, physical therapy major, or consent of instructor. Corequisites, PT 530, 531, 531L. This course provides the foundational understanding of orthopedic diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. This lecture course covers the epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical management, pharmacological management and implications and indications for physical therapy of these disorders to prepare the student for the clinical courses and clinical experiences to follow. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 527 Clinical Pathology: Neurology

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L. Corequisites, PT 521, 523, 523L. This course provides the foundational understanding of neurological diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. This lecture course covers the epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical management, pharmacological management, and implications and indications for physical therapy of these disorders. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 530 Physical Therapy Examination

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 511, 513, 525, 525L, physical therapy major, or consent of instructor. Corequisites, PT 526, 531, 531L. This course is the first in the series of clinical courses where students learn to deliver excellent patient care. Through lecture and laboratory experiences, students learn the theory and technique of basic patient screening and examination procedures as well as develop clinical judgment skills to complete the patient evaluation. Fee: $85. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 531 General Medicine Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 525, 525L, physical therapy major, or consent of instructor. Corequisites, PT 526, 530, 531L. This lecture course covers the physical therapy management of patients with general medical conditions in a variety of practice settings with particular emphasis in the acute care setting. Basic patient handling and functional training skills are emphasized while students incorporate patient examination findings into their treatment intervention choices. Medical documentation using a S,O,A,P format is introduced. This course also includes a major unit on wound management. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 531L General Medicine Practice Management Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 525, 525L, physical therapy major, or consent of instructor. Corequisites, PT 526, 530, 531. This laboratory course examines the physical therapy management of patients with general medical conditions in a variety of practice settings with particular emphasis in the acute-care setting. Basic patient handling and functional training skills are emphasized while students incorporate patient examination findings into their treatment intervention choices. Medical documentation using a S,O,A,P format is introduced. This lab also includes a unit on wound management. Fee: $185. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 535 Musculoskeletal Practice Management I: Lower Quarter

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 510L, 511, 512, 525, 525L, 526, 530. This course is the first in a two part clinical series designed to prepare the DPT student to be excellent at management of musculoskeletal disorders. This series emphasizes an integrated examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention approach. This course focuses on musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity, lumbar, and sacroiliac joints and is designed to integrate basic science principles with personal and cultural values and skills to deepen and hone professional clinical judgment. (Offered as needed.) 5 credits.

PT 539 Physical Agents

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, PT 510, 525. This lecture and lab course will integrate basic science into patient case studies so students may use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to select optimal physical therapy treatment interventions using physical agents. Evaluation and treatment of muscle and nerve dysfunction using therapeutic modalities, assessment and management of pain and wounds will also be addressed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 591 Clinical Practicum I

Introduction to clinical education, behavioral expectations for physical therapists, and clinical opportunities to practice physical therapy skills in selected areas of health care. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 610 Functional Human Anatomy II

Prerequisite, PT 510, 510L (with a grade of C or better). This is the second in the series of two human anatomy courses designed specifically for the DPT student. Students will dissect the components the human body and study the interrelationships between structure and function with regard to normal and pathological conditions. The study of radiological images will also be included. Students are required to think critically, solve problems, and assess the scientific literature as they apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios and integrate the coursework with that of other courses in the curriculum. Fee: $150. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 629 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest to the physical therapy field. It may be repeated for credit provided the course content is different. Number of credits will be determined according to the specified topic and objectives. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

PT 638 Musculoskeletal Practice Management II: Upper Quarter

Prerequisites, PT 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 535. This course is the second in a two part clinical series designed to prepare the DPT student to be excellent with management of musculoskeletal disorders. This series emphasizes an integrated examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention approach and this course focuses on musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity, cervical spine, head and thorax. Coursework is designed to integrate basic science principles with personal and cultural values and skills to deepen and hone professional clinical judgment. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 640 Neurological Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 527, 530, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 640L. Theory and principles of motor control and motor learning will be applied to the management of the patient with neurologic dysfunction. Neuro-facilitation and task-oriented approaches to examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention will be investigated. Course must be taken concurrently with laboratory. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 640L Neurological Practice Management Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 527, 530, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 640. Theory and principles of motor control and motor learning will be applied to the management of the patient with neurologic dysfunction. Neuro-facilitation and task-oriented approaches to examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention will be investigated. This laboratory course is partnered with the lecture component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 641 Rehabilitation Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 527, 530, physical therapy major. This course prepares physical therapist students to deliver excellent patient care in the rehabilitation environment. Included in this course are the respective roles of members of the rehabilitation team, patient evaluation, goal setting, and treatment planning including orthotic and prosthetic prescription and management, wheelchair and other adaptive equipment evaluation and prescription, pathological gait analysis, evaluation of home accessibility and discharge planning. Students will explore the challenges encountered by physical therapists in the rehabilitation environment through directed readings, classroom discussions and as well as laboratory activities. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 643 Motor Control and Motor Learning

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 643L. This course introduces the science of motor control/motor learning including the neuromotor processes that underlie normal and abnormal movement. Theories of motor learning and mechanisms for acquisition of skill are discussed. Neuromotor and neuropsychological research are investigated and clinical implications are discussed. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 643L Motor Control and Motor Learning Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 643. This laboratory introduces the science of motor control/motor learning including the neuromotor processes that underlie normal and abnormal movement. Applications of theories of motor control/learning and mechanisms for acquisition of skill are examined and applied to physical therapy practice. Neuromotor and neuropsychological research are investigated and clinical implications are discussed. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 646 Cardiopulmonary Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 525, 525L, physical therapy major. This course prepares PT students to deliver excellent patient care to patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. Students gain an overview of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology and the comprehensive physical therapy management of patients with cardiopulmonary diseases through lecture and lab activities. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 647 Pediatric Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 647L. This lecture course prepares physical therapy students to meet entry-level physical therapy to pediatric clients in all practice settings. Patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, and intervention will be discussed in relation to commonly encountered pediatric diagnoses. Environmental, cultural, legislative, and legal issues that affect the delivery of care are explored. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

PT 647L Pediatric Practice Management Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L. Corequisite, PT 647. This laboratory course prepares physical therapy students to meet entry-level physical therapy to pediatric clients in all practice settings. Patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, and intervention will be practiced in relation to commonly encountered pediatric diagnoses. Environmental, cultural, legislative, and legal issues that affect the delivery of care are explored. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

PT 650 Scientific Inquiry I

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is the first step in making students critical consumers of the scientific literature related to the practice of healthcare, specifically physical therapy. Basic research approaches with application to physical therapy are reviewed in a lecture and seminar format. These research approaches include descriptive research, grounded theory research to experimental designs and others with an emphasis on clinical applications. The concepts associated with Evidence Based Medicine will be introduced. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 651 Scientific Inquiry II

Prerequisites, PT 650, physical therapy major. This course is the second in the series with introduction of specific descriptive and inferential statistics introduced through lecture and review of current literature. Students continue to develop critical reading and writing skills with production of potential research proposals based on designs discussed in class. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 660 Directed Research I

Prerequisites, PT 650, consent of instructor. This course builds on the students' previous knowledge of writing skills and designing a research hypothesis. This course is the first in a four-semester sequence designed to guide the student through a complete research project. In this course students select a research topic and complete a written review of the literature culminating in a research hypothesis. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 661 Directed Research II

Prerequisites, PT 650, 660, consent of instructor. This course builds on the students’ previous work in PT 560 where the literature review and research question is completed. In addition, they will need to integrate their knowledge of experimental design and statistical analysis. This course is the second in a four-semester sequence designed to guide the student through a complete research project. A proposal based on a stated hypothesis will be brought to a final acceptable form. IRB approval is obtained. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 665 Diagnostic Imaging

Prerequisites, PT 510, physical therapy major. This lecture/lab course will familiarize the DPT student with clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging including plain film x-ray, magnetic resonance and computerized tomography films. Selection protocols will be discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course will focus on the clinical interpretation and integration of imaging data into rehabilitation regimen design, outcome assessment and communication with other medical professionals. (Offered as needed.) 2½ credits.

PT 670 Cultural Diversity and Psychology of Health Care

This course is a seminar, lecture, and discussion course involving the study of oppression theory followed by issues of racism, sexism, and homophobia and their effects on healthcare outcomes. The social, legal, and professional impact will be analyzed from the historical perspective with attention to the current and future implications for the practice of physical therapy. Students will also gain an in depth understanding of human behavior as it relates to coping and adjustment behaviors in acute and chronic illness. Culturally appropriate patient education through programs for patients, family members, caregivers and professional colleagues will be addressed as well as reasonable alternative approaches in health care. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3½ credits.

PT 671 Physical Therapy Ethics

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is an overview of basic ethical principles relevant to the patient-provider role. Dilemmas frequently encountered in physical therapy in both clinical and research settings are integrated into the course content. The course is conducted in a lecture/seminar format. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 682 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PT 683 PT and the Health Care System

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This first semester of this course introduces students to the current status of the healthcare system in the United States and the role of physical therapist in the continuum of care providers. The second semester will cover legal responsibilities of the physical therapist with focus on jurisdictional requirements in California and current legal issues. My be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½ credit.

PT 689 Service Learning

This course is an educational opportunity in which students learn about social responsibility, advocacy, and the importance of life-long civic engagement, through active participation in purposeful volunteer community service. The importance of service learning in the education of physical therapy students is demonstrated by CAPTE’s Practice Management Expectations for Social Responsibility and Advocacy, Advocate for the health and wellness needs of society, and Participate and show leadership in community organizations and volunteer service. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) ½–2½ credits.

PT 690 Clinical Affiliation

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, consent of instructor. This course gives students additional work experiences and practice related to the major of physical therapy. The course may not be used to substitute for required clinical practical or internship courses. Work hours for credit determined by instructor. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

PT 691 Clinical Practicum II

Prerequisite, PT 591. Continuation of clinical education, behavioral expectations for physical therapists, and clinical opportunities to practice physical therapy skills in selected areas of health care. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 692 Clinical Experience I–12

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, good academic standing in the DPT program. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 12-week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 6 credits.

PT 693 Clinical Experience I–8

Prerequisites, physical therapy major, good academic standing in the DPT program. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 8 week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice. Students who complete PT 693 will not be eligible to take PT 794. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 701 Professional Self-Assessment

Prerequisites, admission to the transitional DPT program. This course provides for the use of a portfolio process for self assessment of professional knowledge and skills, for decision making regarding course work to be completed in a post-professional curriculum, and for communication of assessment results with faculty. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 702 Principles of Evidence Based Practice

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Students will focus on developing the skills needed for search, access, retrieve, synthesize, and critique the published literature and other selected media and integrating scientific literature into patient care within physical therapy practice. Current journal articles, texts, and online resources will be used in the course to develop clinical decision making skills based on available evidence. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 710 Diagnostic Imaging

Prerequisite, successful completion (with a grade of C or better) of PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course will familiarize the DPT student with clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging including plain film x-ray, magnetic resonance and computerized tomography films. Selection protocols will be discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course will focus on the clinical interpretation and integration of imaging data into rehabilitation regimen design, outcome assessment and communication with other medical professionals. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 711 Applied Pharmacology

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course provides the foundational understanding of pharmacology for physical therapists to provide optimal patient management to patients who are taking prescription and non-prescription medications. The general principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented as well as the mechanism of action of common groups of medications that influence the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary and integumentary systems. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 712 Pharmacology

This course will familiarize the physical therapy student with basic and applied clinical pharmacology. Class content includes the effects of pharmacotherapy on the health and well being of patients and clinical incorporation of pharmacological data into treatment selection and delivery. Students will gain familiarity with prescription and over-the-counter medication brand and generic names, indications, contraindications, dosage schedules, and potential effects and side effects of significance to physical therapy treatment. (Offered as needed.) 2½ credits.

PT 720 Screening Examinations

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is designed to prepare the DPT student to complete screening examinations for clients/patients through the lifespan. The screening goal is to determine the need for prevention services, further examination by a physical therapist, or referral to another practitioner. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 721 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with musculoskeletal complaints. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 722 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with neurological insults. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions, and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 723 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with cardiopulmonary findings. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 725 Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course will examine human pathology. Specific areas for this course include an introduction to the general response to injury, wound healing and healing complications, pain mechanisms, immunity and autoimmune disorders. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 730 Physical Therapy Ethics for Practitioners

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course is an overview of basic ethical principles including, but not limited to, autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, veracity, and justice as well as an examination of the feminists' approach to medical ethics. In addition, models of health care delivery are examined and evaluated for compliance with basic principles of fair resource allocation. Dilemmas frequently encountered in physical therapy in both clinical and research settings are integrated into the course content. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 731 Professional Leadership and Development

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course addresses current and future professional, legal, and ethical issues related to physical therapy practice, education, and research and prepared students for leadership roles as change agents in the profession. Students examine evolving roles for the profession as affected by such factors as changing societal demands, trends in health care, government regulations, and the expanding body of knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 738 Advanced Patient/Client Management and Therapeutic Exercise

Prerequisites, PT 793, or 794, and physical therapy major. In this lecture and lab course, the anatomical/physiological bases for patient/client practice management are combined with the available evidence for managing patients with multiple diagnoses and complex pathologies/impairments. Students consider cultural, psychological, and administrative aspects of patient care including supervision of students and physical therapist assistants. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 740 Advanced Clinical Internship

Prerequisite, PT 722, or consent of instructor. Student to develop and practice clinical decision making by utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) in the workplace, promoting EBP to the community, and demonstrating application of program content to the clinical setting. Student and faculty to identify specific areas of program content which are to be emphasized in clinical setting. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 2–6 credits.

PT 742 Geriatric Practice Management

Students are expected to have a working knowledge of prerequisite course material in order to build on these concepts and integrate them into physical therapy management of the geriatric client. This lecture and laboratory course investigates the normal aging process, common pathologies, functional assessments, the health care system, quality of life issues, culture, ageism, and wellness and health promotion issues as they apply to the elderly population. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 748 Wellness and Complementary Medicine

Prerequisites, PT 638, 640, 643, 646. Corequisite, PT 742. This course prepares physical therapy students to incorporate their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and alternative approaches to health care into the delivery of excellent patient care. Students will integrate information related to diet, nutrition, and wellness behavior from courses in applied human physiology and cardiopulmonary practice management into comprehensive physical therapy treatment plans for patients in all likely settings. In addition, students will become familiar with commonly encountered treatment approaches that fall under the umbrella of alternative or complementary medicine. The emphasis of this portion of the course is the scientific evidence related to these approaches. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 748A Wellness and Complementary Medicine

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course prepares physical therapy students to incorporate their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and alternative approaches to health care into the delivery of excellent patient care. Students will integrate information related to diet, nutrition, and wellness behavior from courses in applied human physiology and cardiopulmonary practice management into comprehensive physical therapy treatment plans for patients in all likely settings. In addition, students will become familiar with commonly encountered treatment approaches that fall under the umbrella of "alternative" or "complementary" medicine. The emphasis of this portion of the course is the scientific evidence related to these approaches. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 752 Scientific Inquiry III

Prerequisites, PT 650, 651. A guided/supervised research experience, which will focus on a variety of clinically applicable research designs including, but not limited to true experimental, quasi experimental research, single study designs, case reports, and systematic reviews. Current journal articles and texts will be used in the course to develop clinical research in physical therapy. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 753 Scientific Inquiry IV

Prerequisites, PT 650, 651, 752. Another semester of guided/supervised research experience, which will focus on a variety of clinically applicable research designs including, but not limited to true experimental, quasi experimental research, single study designs, case reports, and systematic reviews. Current journal articles and texts will be used in the course to develop clinical research in physical therapy. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 758 Elective in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. In this course, students work with faculty mentors to explore areas of special interest in physical therapy. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 762 Directed Research III

Prerequisites, PT 650, 660, 661, consent of instructor. This course is the third in a four-semester series of courses designed to guide students through an independent faculty-sponsored research project. In this course, students continue to work on their research project as they update their review of the literature and methods and collect data. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 763 Directed Research IV

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is a continuation of PT 660, 661, 762, Directed Research I, II, III. Data analysis is completed and the manuscript reaches a final acceptable form. A poster presentation of the research project may be required. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 771 Responsible Leadership and Administration

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is a study of the theoretical and historical aspects of management applied to physical therapy services. During the course the student will gain an understanding of basic management science including organizational structures, regulatory compliance, billing requirements and quality management. A study of major healthcare legislation will be covered along with mechanisms for advocacy for meeting the healthcare needs of society (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 782 Applied Administration

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is the study of financial, legal, human resources management of efficient delivery of physical therapy services. Marketing and public relations along with aspects of risk management and reporting requirements essential to the safe operations of physical therapy services will be covered. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 782T Business Administration in Physical Therapy

Study of the components of various aspects of management of personnel, business management and legal considerations in management which are related to the administration of physical therapy services. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 789 Service Learning

This course is a continuation of educational opportunity in which students learn about social responsibility, advocacy, and the importance of life-long civic engagement, through active participation in purposeful volunteer community service. The importance of service learning in the education of physical therapy students is demonstrated by CAPTE’s Practice Management Expectations for Social Responsibility and Advocacy, Advocate for the health and wellness needs of society, and Participate and show leadership in community organizations and volunteer service. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) ½–2½ credits.

PT 790 Special Topics in Physical Therapy

Prerequisites, physical therapy, or transitional physical therapy major, and consent of instructor. Advanced supervised group study or research on a special topic. Examples of topics include innovative practice areas (such as sports, women's health, oncology, alternative practice), emerging delivery areas (such as direct access, underserved populations, fee for service), education, administrative, or research. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PT 793 Clinical Experience II–12

Prerequisites, PT 692, or 693, and physical therapy major. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 12-week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 6 credits.

PT 794 Clinical Experience II–8

Prerequisites, PT 692, physical therapy major. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 8 week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice. Students who take PT 693 are not eligible to take PT 794. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 795 Clinical Experience III

Prerequisite, PT 793. Continuation of PT 793. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 8 credits.

PT 796A Clinical Experience IIIA

Prerequisite, PT 793. Corequisite, enroll in the clinical experience option selected for degree. Continuation of PT 793. P/NP. Fee: $75. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 796B Clinical Experience IIIB

Prerequisite, PT 793. Corequisite, PT 796A. Continuation of PT 793. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 796C Clinical Experience IIIC

Prerequisites, PT 793. Corequisite, PT 796A. A specialized internship on a contractual basis designed to allow the student to pursue an area of physical therapy practice in great depth. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 796I International Clinical Experience

Prerequisite, PT 793. Corequisite, PT 796A. A specialized international internship on a contractual basis designed to allow students to pursue an area of physical therapy practice in a foreign country. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PT 799 Research or Individual Study in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite, enrolled in the professional or post-professional DPT curriculum, consent of advisor. Advanced supervised individual study or research on a special topic, problem or current professional issue. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Physical Therapy Transitional

PTT 702 Principles of Evidence Based Practice

Prerequisite, admission to the transitional DPT program. This course needs to be taken by all TDPT students. Students will focus on developing the skills needed for search, access, retrieve, synthesize, and critique the published literature and other selected media. Another focus of the course will be on integrating scientific literature into patient care within physical therapy practice. Current journal articles, texts, and online resources will be used in the course to develop clinical decision making skills based on available evidence. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and seminar course with most of the information covered online. (Offered as needed.) 2 credit.

PTT 703 Scientific Inquiry in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite, admission to the transitional DPT program (bachelor degree entry only). This course will be taken by TDPT students whose highest degree is the BS in PT. It focuses on developing the skills needed to understand and reproduce the scientific inquiry process utilizing human subjects and patient/clients or post-hoc documentation. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 710 Diagnostic Imaging

Prerequisites, transitional DPT program, Physical Therapy licensure in the United States. This course will familiarize the DPT student with clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging including plain film x-ray, magnetic resonance and computerized tomography films. Selection protocols will be discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course will focus on the clinical interpretation and integration of imaging data into rehabilitation regimen design, outcome assessment and communication with other medical professionals. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and seminar course with most of the information covered online. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PTT 711 Applied Pharmacology

Prerequisite, transitional DPT program. This course provides the foundational understanding of pharmacology for physical therapists to provide optimal patient management to patients who are taking prescription and non-prescription medications. The general principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented as well as the mechanism of action of common groups of medications that influence the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary and integumentary systems. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and seminar course with most of the information covered online. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PTT 720 Medical Systems Screening

Prerequisites, PTT 725, transitional DPT program, or consent of instructor. This course is designed to prepare the transitional DPT student to complete screening examinations for clients/patients through the lifespan. The screening goal is to determine the need for prevention services, further examination by a physical therapist, or referral to another practitioner. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PTT 721 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

Prerequisites, PTT 711, 720, transitional DPT program, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with musculoskeletal complaints. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 722 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

Prerequisites, PTT 711, 720, transitional DPT program, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with neurological insults. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 723 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

Prerequisites, PTT 720, transitional DPT program, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with cardiopulmonary findings. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 725 Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

Prerequisite, transitional DPT program. This course will examine human pathology. Specific areas for this course include an introduction to the general response to injury, wound healing and healing complications, pain mechanisms, immunity and autoimmune disorders. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and seminar course with most of the information covered online. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PTT 742 Geriatric and Integumentar Managment and DDx

Prerequisites, admission to the transitional DPT program, PTT 702, 720, 725. This online/onsite hybrid course combines online lecture and onsite laboratory material to investigate the normal aging process, common pathologies, functional assessments, quality of life issues, culture, ageism, and emergency care of the elderly population. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 747 Pediatric Practice Management and Differential DX

Prerequisites, admission to the transitional DPT program, PTT 702, 720, 725. This online/onsite hybrid course combines online lecture and onsite laboratory material for management of pediatric patient/clients in all practice settings. Patient examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, intervention, and assessment will be discussed in relation to commonly encountered pediatric diagnoses. Environmental, cultural, legislative, and legal issues that affect the delivery of care are explored. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 748 Wellness and Complementary Medicine

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, 723, transitional DPT program, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course which prepares post professional physical therapy students to incorporate knowledge of nutrition, wellness, and alternative health care approaches into the delivery of excellent patient care. Students will integrate information related to diet, nutrition, and wellness behavior into comprehensive physical therapy and wellness plans for patients in all likely settings. In addition, students will become familiar with commonly encountered “alternative” or “complementary” medicine approaches emphasizing scientific evidence. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 775 Ethics and Professionalism in Physical Therapy

Prerequisites, transitional DPT major. This elective course is an online overview of basic ethical principles including, but not limited to, autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, veracity, and justice. In addition, core values and resultant professional behavior for the DPT are defined. Dilemmas frequently encountered in physical therapy in both clinical and research settings are integrated into the course content. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PTT 782 Business Administration in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite, transitional DPT major, or consent of instructor. This elective course addresses current and future issues related to the administration of physical therapy practices and prepares students for leadership roles. Students examine the business requirements and management issues and apply them to 1 or more practice settings. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

Course Descriptions – Physician Assistant

PAS 500 Principles of Medical Science

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This course is designed to give the core foundation for evaluation of disease encountered in Primary Care medicine. The course will cover the etiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and diagnostic studies needed to make treatment and management plans. Coursework will give an organ based overview of human physiology with clinical applications. The course will serve as in introduction to understanding disease epidemiology, additionally the Principles of Medical Science course will provide the introduction to basic laboratory and diagnostic studies. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PAS 501 History and Physical Diagnosis

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental grounding and cognitive knowledge to prepare them for their clinical role in patient centered care. It will serve as an introduction to physical examination techniques, counseling, documentation, and communication skills used to conduct age-appropriate culturally competent histories. The course will progress to acquiring the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity needed to communicate and intervene effectively in a diverse variety of patient encounters. This is a combined lecture and lab course using teaching methods to include small group demonstrations and practice sessions. The course is designed to prepare the student to move from the normal history and physical exam to a more problem focused exam and history that they will encounter in the clinical medicine modules. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PAS 502 Human Anatomy with Lab

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This is a one semester course with a focus on the study of functional and applied human anatomy to clinical practice. Each topic will utilize lecture and lab experiences which include prosected human cadaver specimens. Clinical and surgical correlations are made from a diagnostic, as well as, an operative point of view when applicable. Clinically relevant cases are used for lecture and lab based instruction utilizing textbooks, atlases, models, and computer based programs. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PAS 503 Evidence Based Medicine

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This course provides an introduction to the research process and its relationship to evidence-based practice. Students will obtain a basic understanding of theory-based research, methodological and ethical considerations in the design of research, and ways of evaluating evidence for practice. This course will engage students in active learning activities during lecture, faculty led class discussions, journal readings, and small group sessions. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 504 Pharmacology

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This course will provide PA students with an introduction and foundation in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmocogenetics, drug actions, and interactions. This core knowledge in pharmacy will be utilized to understand disease management and therapy in multiple patient care settings. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PAS 505 Inter-Professional Education

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This course will engage students in interprofessional activities building skills in collaboration through lectures, case studies, and experiential learning with other graduate health science and professional students. Defining the roles and responsibilities of other healthcare team members and the strategies needed to develop and sustain a collaborative relationship with them will be key to the student learning experience. The course will stress the 4 core competencies used for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice as a guide to incorporating IPE into daily practice. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 506 PA Professional Practice I

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. This is the first of a 2 course series that will address the challenges the PA will face as they prepare to enter into practice. The course will give the student an overview of the PA profession and begin with the history and models of the PA profession in medicine. This course will look at the expected future role and trends of the PA in medicine, both in the United States and globally. Additionally this course will provide up to date education, credentialing, accreditation, certification and state licensure processes. The student will learn strategies for effective communication and the pros and cons of the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The course uses lecture, class discussions, readings, and case based studies. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 507 EENT

Prerequisite, physician assistant studies major. A multi-subject course that introduces the student in clinical medicine with a focus on the eyes, ears, nose, and throat (EENT). This is a systems-based module giving a combination of lectures, case based scenarios, and clinical lab experiences in the subjects of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, medical procedures, pharmacology, clinical medicine and surgical conditions involving the eyes, ears, nose, and throat (EENT) systems. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PAS 510 Cardiology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of a cardiac patient. The course covers cardiac anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, patient history and physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the cardiac patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the cardiology module. (Offered summer.) 5 credits.

PAS 511 Pulmonology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of a pulmonary patient. The course covers pulmonary anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the pulmonary patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the pulmonology module. (Offered summer.) 4 credits.

PAS 512 Gastroenterology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of a gastrointestinal (GI) patient. The course covers GI anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the GI patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the gastroenterology module. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PAS 513 Genitourinary

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of a genitourinary (GU) patient. The course covers GU anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the GU patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the genitourinary module. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PAS 514 Endocrinology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of an Endocrine patient. The course covers the organ specific anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the endocrine patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the endocrine module. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PAS 515 Hematology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning hematology. This is a systems-based module giving lectures, case based scenarios, and clinical lab experiences in physiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic studies, medical procedures, pharmacology, clinical medicine, and surgical conditions involving the hematology system and common oncological conditions. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

PAS 516 PA Professional Practice II

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. This is the second of a 2 course series that will address the challenges the PA will face as they prepare to enter into practice. This course will discuss the concepts of Professionalism, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement and System Based Practice. In this course the student will learn about important topics related to rehabilitative, palliative, and end of life care. The student will begin to understand health care delivery systems and health policy, concepts of public health, patient safety, quality improvement, prevention of medical errors, and risk management. The course uses active learning activities in lecture, class discussions, readings, and case based studies. (Offered summer.) 1 credits.

PAS 517 Dermatology

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A multi-subject course that introduces the student in clinical medicine with a focus on the dermatology. This is a systems-based module giving a combination of lectures, case based scenarios, and clinical lab experiences in the subjects of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, medical procedures, pharmacology, clinical medicine and surgical conditions involving the dermatologic system. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PAS 518 Mental and Behavioral Health

Prerequisites, PAS 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507 with GPA 3.0 or greater during the first trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning mental health. The course will discuss counseling and communication skills, substance abuse, culture, ethnicity, and health-related behavior. This module will focus on mental health etiology, epidemiology, clinical signs and symptoms, and physical exam findings. The course emphasis is to provide knowledge for the diagnosis, treatment, management and referral of psychiatric conditions. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PAS 520 Emergency Medicine

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of an Emergency patient. The course covers multi-organ anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the emergent patient. This module emphasizes stabilizing patients with life-threatening trauma or illness and selecting appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Students learn treatment of trauma and medical disorders commonly presenting to the emergency department and become Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advances Life Support (PALS) certified. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the emergency medicine module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 521 Clinical Skills

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to direct patient intervention. Clinical skill sessions will give students hands –on practical application and procedure techniques with a lecture session for each. Students will spend more than half of the time in labs with direct supervision and interaction with faculty. The course includes patient interview and education skills, charting, coding, and understanding the management of disease with the use of clinical interventions. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 522 Neurology

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of a neurologic patient. The course covers neuroanatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the neurologic patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the neurology module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 523 Orthopedics/Rheumatology

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach for the care of an orthopedic and rheumatologic patient. The course covers orthopedic related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the orthopedic and rheumatologic patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PAS 524 Women's Health

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to understanding women’s health. The course covers OB/GYN related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the OB/GYN patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PAS 525 Ethics in PA Practice

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. This ethics course will provide an overview of basic ethical principles relevant to the patient-provider role. It will include dilemmas frequently encountered in health care (clinical, research and administration) and is integrated with the important legal aspects related to medical ethics. The course is conducted using problem and case based activities with a focus on critical thinking and inquiry. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 526 ID and Immunology

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning infectious disease (ID) and immunology. The course covers ID and immunological related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the ID and immunological patients. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 527 Pediatrics

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning pediatric medicine. The course covers pediatric health maintenance, related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of a pediatric patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 528 Geriatrics

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning geriatric medicine. The course covers geriatric related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the geriatric patient. Topics will focus on techniques of communication in this age group, medical treatments specific to the elderly, and navigation through health care systems. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 530 Fundamentals of Surgery

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. A comprehensive approach to learning surgery and inpatient medicine. The course covers surgical disease related anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, history/physical examination skills, diagnostic studies, procedures, and pharmacology. This will progress to the clinical management of the surgical patient. It will include lab time developing the clinical skills on sterile technique, suturing and gowning/gloving. This course includes pre-operative evaluation, peri-and post-operative tenants of care for the surgical patient. The course will utilize lectures, case based scenarios, and faculty driven clinical lab experiences to develop critical thinking for the module. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 531 Research Methods and Design

Prerequisites, PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the second trimester, physician assistant studies major. Instruction in research methods and application to the clinical setting. Basic concepts of epidemiology and statistics integrate into concepts related to medical practice. Students critically read published reports of clinical research then identify strengths and weaknesses in structure, data presentation and conclusions. This course provides skills necessary to practice evidence based medicine. This will lead the students into their senior project. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credits.

PAS 601 Family Medicine

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of Family Medicine. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in an outpatient Family Medicine setting. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 602 Internal Medicine - Inpatient

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of hospitalist medicine. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in an inpatient setting, with a focus on commonly encountered clinical conditions, procedures, and health management systems. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 603 Internal Medicine - Outpatient

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of internal medicine. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in an outpatient setting, with a focus on commonly encountered clinical conditions, procedures, and health management systems. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 604 Women's Health and OB-GYN

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of Women’s Health. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in outpatient and some inpatient settings, with a focus on women’s health issues and obstetrics. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 605 Emergency Medicine

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of emergency medicine. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences where students are assigned to an emergency department that will focus on a variety of conditions commonly encountered in emergency medicine. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 606 General Surgery

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of general surgery. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in a perioperative/surgical setting, with a focus on medical conditions, surgical procedures, and health management systems commonly encountered in general surgery practice. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 607 Mental and Behavior Health

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of mental and behavioral health. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in a variety of outpatient, inpatient, and clinical settings, with a focus on mental and behavioral health conditions commonly encountered in psychiatry. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 608 Pediatrics

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to the specialty of Pediatrics. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in outpatient and some inpatient settings, with a focus on commonly encountered pediatric health issues. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 609 Elective

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. This course introduces students to a unique specialty. This course will consist of supervised clinical experiences in outpatient or inpatient settings, with a focus on specialty specific health issues. The course will consist of combined clinical experiences and didactic sessions, supervised by program faculty and approved clinical preceptors. (Offered every semester.) 5 credits.

PAS 697 Graduate Project I

Prerequisites, completion of all first-year courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, physician assistant studies major. Graduate Project I is a two (2) credit course intended to prepare the graduate candidate for the development of a project related to the candidate’s research interests. The Graduate Project provides students with the opportunity to creatively address a proven deficiency in the realms of clinical medicine, educational medicine (patient or medical provider material), or other area that will further the student’s and the profession’s knowledge and/or resource base. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PAS 698 Graduate Project II

Prerequisites, physician assistant studies major. Graduate Project II is a two (2) credit course intended to prepare the graduate candidate for the development of a project related to the candidate’s research interests. The Graduate Project provides students with the opportunity to creatively address a proven deficiency in the realms of clinical medicine, educational medicine (patient or medical provider material), or other area that will further the student’s and the profession’s knowledge and/or resource base. This course builds upon the medical research foundational principles learned in PAS 531 Research Methods and Design. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.