Schmid College of Science and Technology

Janeen Hill, Ph.D., Dean

Catherine Clark, Ph.D., Associate Dean, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Michael Fahy, Ph.D., Associate Dean, School of Computational Sciences

Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Professors: Griffin, Verkhivker;

Associate Professors: Brownell, Wellman;

Assistant Professors: Prytkova, Rowland-Goldsmith, Schwartz.

Faculty of Biological Sciences

Professors: Carson, Frisch, Hill, Piper, Sumida, Yang;

Associate Professors: Brownell, Wright;

Assistant Professors: Funk, Keller, Rowland-Goldsmith;

Lecturer: Renault;

Research Associate: Takagi.

Faculty of Chemistry

Professors: Clark, de Bruyn, Griffin;

Associate Professors: Kim, Wellman;

Assistant Professors: Prytkova, Schwartz.

Faculty of Computer Science

Professors: Fahy, Moshier, Radenski;

Assistant Professors: Linstead, Zhao.

Faculty of Food Science

Professors: Caporaso, Prakash;

Associate Professor: Were;

Assistant Professor: Hellberg.

Faculty of Mathematics

Professors: Fahy, Jipsen, Ortiz-Franco, Moshier, Porter, Rassenti, Struppa;

Associate Professors: Allali, Vajiac, A., Vajiac, M.;

Assistant Professors: Rakovski, Toto;

Instructor: Goetz.

Faculty of Physical Therapy

Professors: Gabard, McKenzie, Sumida;

Associate Professors: Brechter, Cipriani, Grant-Beuttler;

Assistant Professor: Tominaga;

Clinical Professor: Biederman;

Clinical Associate Professor: Tierney;

Clinical Instructors: Gilliland, Hignojoz.

Faculty of Physics, Computational Science and Engineering

Professors: Aharonov, Kafatos, Singh, Tollaksen, Yang;

Associate Professors: El-Askary, Ouzounov;

Assistant Professors: Buniy, Minassian, Nayeri.

Faculty of Psychology

Professor: Schandler;

Associate Professors: Brodbeck, Glynn, Peterson, Pincus, Shears;

Assistant Professors: Boehm, Dana, Frederick, Hahn-Holbrook;

Clinical Instructor: Jonathan.

The Schmid College of Science and Technology prepares graduate students for the complex world of the 21st Century by challenging them to think critically, to engage in research and clinical work, and to become involved with local, regional, and international communities. The College offers traditional, interdisciplinary, and professional graduate degrees designed for students who aspire to become tomorrow’s scientists, health care providers, and leaders in fields related to science and technology.

Schmid College of Science and Technology is organized into three schools, Computational Sciences, Earth and Environmental Sciences, and Health and Life Sciences. Each school offers graduate degrees supported by a dynamic research and teaching faculty whose commitment to graduate students is extraordinary. The Schmid College of Science and Technology invites you to join our dynamic community of faculty and graduate students.

School of Computational Sciences

Michael Fahy, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Professors: Aharonov, Fahy, Jipsen, Moshier, Ortiz-Franco, Porter, Radenski, Rassenti, Struppa, Tollaksen, Verkhivker, Yang;

Associate Professors: Allali, Vajiac, A., Vajiac, M., Zhao;

Assistant Professors: Buniy, Linstead, Minassian, Nayeri, Prytkova, Rakovski, Toto;

Instructor: Goetz.

Master of Science in Computational Science

Ph.D. in Computational Science

The School of Computational Sciences encompasses the study of disciplines that span the entire development of our civilization from the earliest and most fundamental to the newest and most exciting. The School of Computational Sciences provides a cornerstone of the liberal arts at Chapman University, including subjects such as geometry and astronomy that formed the core of the classical liberal arts, and provides the ideas and techniques to add the critical computational component to all of the sciences. Our faculty are internationally known teacher-scholars committed to interdisciplinary faculty-mentored student research.

The School offers an MS degree, and a Ph.D. degree in computational science. The MS has three areas of study available in the program: Earth systems science, applied mathematics, and biology and biotechnology. The Ph.D. in computational science is a 72-credit post baccalaureate research degree with a wide range of specializations. The curriculum places strong emphasis on each student’s background with the goal of producing high-quality doctoral research.

Computational science is an interdisciplinary field in which computers are used to reduce the need for expensive and time demanding experimental scientific investigations, utilizing modeling and simulation of biological and physical scientific processes. Computational science is the science of the future. It is the discipline that tackles fundamental scientific and engineering problems (biological, physical, geophysical, environmental, chemical, as well as fluid and structural dynamics) through the use of advanced computing methodologies.

Computational scientists work in and across all areas of the sciences (e.g., astrophysics, Earth system science, biosciences) by applying high-performance computing to fuse data sets, visualize theoretical possibilities and create knowledge. The goal is to engage cutting-edge technology to answer the most perplexing scientific questions.

Master of Science in Computational Science

Computational science is a uniquely interdisciplinary approach to solving critically important problems, using mathematics, computing, physics, chemistry, biology and statistics. Through the modeling, simulation, data mining, and study of specific phenomena via computer analysis and engineering, students learn to apply extraordinary technology and processes to answer the world’s most complex questions as part of their computational science program.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

An undergraduate degree in computational science is not required for admission.

Prerequisites

All prerequisites must be met by the end of the first semester. 

  1. differential equations
  2. data structures

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Online application for admission (which includes $60 non-refundable application fee).
  2. Official transcript from degree granting institution.
  3. Graduate admission test scores – The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores are required and must have been taken within the last five years. Applicants must achieve the following minimum scores which are listed as previous version test scores and new version test scores, respectively: Verbal: 500/153; Quantitative: 550/146; Analytical Writing: 4.0/4.0.
  4. Graduate admission test scores – The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) subject test scores are required and must have been taken within the last five years. Applicants must achieve a minimum score in the 60th percentile in any subject.
  5. Letters of recommendation – two letters of recommendation are required, including one from an academic source which describes your professional and academic abilities.
  6. Statement of intent – a 750 word essay. Applicants are expected to address science topics they are interested in and how they envision applying computational science in those areas.
  7. Resume – a resume or curriculum vitae is required.
  8. TOEFL (International Students Only) – applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 80 (internet-based).
  9. Financial certification form (International Students Only).

Requirements for the degree

core courses (13 credits)

CS 500

Computational Science Seminars

1

CS 510

Foundations of Scientific Computing

3

CS 520

Mathematical Modeling

3

CS 530

Scientific Databases and Data Mining

3

CS 540

High-Performance Computing

3

electives (12 credits)

choose four courses in one of the areas of study

Earth system science area of study

HGEC 510

Introduction to Natural Hazards

3

PHYS 520

Physical Principles of Remote Sensing

3

HGEC 530

Earth System Science

3

HGEC 540

Global Climate Change

3

HGEC 620

Image Processing and Data Analysis

3

HGEC 630

Meteorology, Weather and Climate

3

HGEC 650

Remote Sensing of the Environment

3

applied mathematics area of study

CS 550

Digital Image Processing

3

CS 560

Applied Partial Differential Equations

3

CS 570

Advanced Numerical Methods

3

MATH 580

Modern Algebra I

3

CS 610

Models of Computing

3

CS 650

Advanced Linear Algebra and Digital Signal Processing

3

CS 660

Fourier Analysis

3

CS 680

Computational Algebra I

3

biology and biotechnology area of study

CS 620

Foundations in Mathematical Bioscience

3

CS 621

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I

3

CS 622

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology II

3

CS 623

Computational Systems Biology

3

CS 624

Biostatistics

3

CS 625

Bioinformatics Algorithms

3

CS 630

Data Mining and Information Retrieval

3

economic systems design area of study

ECON 530

Computational Economics

4

ECON 564

Game Theory

3

ECON 582

Economic Systems Design II: Case Studies and Analysis

4

ECON 683

Economic Systems Design III

4

ECON 685

Economic Systems Design Lab I

4

ECON 686

Economic Systems Design Lab II

4

research courses (6 credits)

choose one of the following options*

option 1

CS 697

Thesis

6

option 2

CS 664

Research Topics in Computational Science

3

CS 665

Capstone Project (Directed Reading)

3

total credits

 

31

*The option shall be declared when the student has been admitted and successfully completed the core requirements in the program.

4+1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Computational Science

The Schmid College of Science and Technology offers an integrated program for undergraduates which enables students to begin taking M.S. course work in their senior year and receive a M.S. in computational science within one year of finishing their undergraduate studies. Thus, students can earn a B.S. and M.S. in 5 years. Students can apply to the M.S. program in their junior or senior year. Students will receive conditional admission to the program, pending completion of their BS degree as stipulated in the graduate catalog (see explanation for conditional admission in the graduate catalog). If accepted to the M.S. program, students can take up to 12 credits in MS 500-level courses during their senior year. The application process, prerequisites, GPA, and graduate program requirements are as specified for the M.S. program in computational science.

An undergraduate student who is a senior may enroll in 500-level courses with the permission of the program director. An undergraduate student may enroll in a maximum of 12 credits of 500-level courses that will count towards both the BS and MS degrees. So, for future admission to the (4+1) program, by the end of the fourth (senior) year, the student should have completed at least 124 credits including the 12 graduate credits that will be double counted and have at least a 3.000 cumulative GPA, and then they will be eligible to complete the master's degree in one additional year.

Ph.D. in Computational Science

The Ph.D. in computational science is a 70-credit post baccalaureate research degree. The curriculum places strong emphasis on each student’s background with the goal of producing high-quality doctoral research.

Computational science is an interdisciplinary field in which computers are used to reduce the need for expensive and time demanding experimental scientific investigations, utilizing modeling and simulation of biological and physical scientific processes. Computational science is the science of the future. It is the discipline that tackles fundamental scientific and engineering problems (biological, physical, geophysical, environmental, chemical, as well as fluid and structural dynamics) through the use of advanced computing methodologies.

Computational scientists work in and across all areas of the sciences (e.g., astrophysics, earth system science, biosciences) by applying high-performance computing to fuse data sets, visualize theoretical possibilities and create knowledge. The goal is to engage cutting-edge technology to answer the most perplexing scientific questions.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

An undergraduate degree specifically in computational science is not required for admission; because of its basic orientation, the program will consider applicants from a broad range of undergraduate and master's level science disciplines (e.g. biology; chemistry, computer science, biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, mathematics, physics). Admission will depend on the relationship between the student’s goals and the program’s objectives as well as the likelihood that the student will benefit from the program.

Prerequisites

All prerequisites must be met by the end of the first semester. 

  1. Differential Equations
  2. Data Structures

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Online application for admission to the Ph.D. in computational science program (which includes a $60 non-refundable application fee);
  2. Official transcripts from degree conferring institution(s) including all post-baccalaureate graduate course work and advanced degree (if applicable). A cumulative grade point average of 3.000 is required.
  3. Successful admission applicants will have completed undergraduate course work in differential equations and in data structures or the equivalent.
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores taken within the last five years. Applicants must achieve the following minimum scores which are listed as previous version test scores and new version test scores, respectively: Verbal: 500/153; Quantitative: 550/146; Analytical Writing: 4.0/4.0.
  5. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) subject test scores are required and must have been taken within the last five years. Applicants must achieve the following minimum score in the 60th percentile in biochemistry; cell and molecular biology; biology; chemistry; computer science; mathematics or physics.
  6. Letters of recommendation – two letters of recommendation are required, including one from an academic source which describes your professional and academic abilities.
  7. Resume – a resume or curriculum vitae is required.
  8. TOEFL (International Students Only) – applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 80 (internet-based).
  9. Financial Certification Form (International Students Only).

Requirements for the degree

The degree consists of core courses, elective courses, research courses and dissertation comprising a total of 70 credits. The curriculum, which places a strong emphasis on individual students’ backgrounds, with the goal of producing high-quality doctoral research, is structured as follows:

During the third semester of the program each student will work with the faculty to create a Doctoral Committee consisting of three faculty members. Either one faculty member will serve as the chair of the Doctoral Committee or two faculty members will serve as co-chairs. The student, together will the Doctoral Committee, will prepare an academic plan for the student that will specify the remaining elective courses and the Doctoral Research courses that the student will take, and will also specify the problem or area of research that the student will explore in the student’s dissertation. The academic plan will be submitted to the Doctoral Steering Committee and must be approved by the Doctoral Steering Committee before the student can continue to the third year.

In order to advance to doctoral candidacy, a student must:

core courses (13 credits)

CS 500

Computational Science Seminars

1

CS 510

Foundations of Scientific Computing

3

CS 520

Mathematical Modeling

3

CS 530

Scientific Databases and Data Mining

3

CS 540

High-Performance Computing

3

elective and research courses (45 credits) a minimum of 15 credits from each category

45

electives (15-30 credits)

5 to 10 courses selected from among the graduate courses in computer science, computational sciences, hazards, global and environmental change, mathematics, physics and economic sciences. To encourage interdisciplinary research, a student must take a minimum of two courses in two distinct subject areas. For example, two courses in biological subjects and three in economics subjects will be accepted. See current elective courses below for a list of courses that have been approved for elective credit.

research courses (15-30 credits) 5 courses

CS 770

Topics in Computational Science

3

CS 799

Doctoral Studies

3

dissertation (12 credits)

CS 797

Dissertation Research

1–6

total credits

 

70

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Catherine Clark, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Professors: Clark, de Bruyn, Kafatos, Piper, Singh;

Associate Professors:  El-Askary, Kim, Ouzounov, Wright;

Assistant Professors: Funk, Keller, Schwartz.

Master of Science in Hazards, Global and Environmental Change

The School of Earth and Environmental Sciences offers a graduate master's degree program in hazards, global and environmental change. Our curriculum develops students' knowledge, interpersonal skills and practical expertise through a combination of a comprehensive didactic classroom education with research emphasizing an evidence-based empirical approach to problem solving. Our faculty are teacher-scholars committed to developing students' communication and critical thinking skills via scientific discovery and exploration through interdisciplinary faculty-mentored student research projects addressing environmental issues on a global scale. Our students' ability to adapt skills and knowledge to new settings is grounded in knowledge of the natural world, intellectual and practical skills like creative thinking and problem solving, and a recognition of personal and social responsibilities on a regional and global scale.

Master of Science in Hazards, Global and Environmental Change

Radical fluctuations in earth system dynamics, large-scale environmental changes, hazards (both natural and those caused by human actions)—these are the problems that the master of science in hazards, global and environmental change (HGEC) aims to address. This program provides a solid foundation to observe and understand earth's systems and their interactions, and the sources of environmental hazards through remote sensing satellite techniques and working with large databases. Computational techniques are emphasized.

Admission to the program

Requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. This must be documented by an official copy of a transcript showing the baccalaureate degree.
  2. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.000 or better in the last 60 graded semester credits (or 90 quarter credits) earned prior to the baccalaureate degree.
  3. Three submitted letters of recommendation from individuals with direct knowledge of the applicant's professional and academic competence (at least one from an academic source).
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within the last five years with a minimum score of 500 both on the verbal and quantitative section, 4.5 on the analytical writing section. A score at or above the 60th percentile on any one of the graduate subject tests is required.
  5. Applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum of 550 (paper-based), or 80 (internet-based).

Requirements for the degree

A grade of "C" or above is required to have courses count towards the degree.

core courses (13 credits)

HGEC 500

Hazards, Climate, and Earth System Science Seminars

1

HGEC 510

Introduction to Natural Hazards

3

PHYS 520

Physical Principles of Remote Sensing

3

HGEC 530

Earth System Science

3

HGEC 540

Global Climate Change

3

research courses (6 credits)

choose one of the following options*

option 1

HGEC 697

Thesis

6

option 2

HGEC 665

Directed Reading

3

HGEC 699

Individual Study in Global Hazards Topics

3

electives (12-14 credits)

choose four of the following

IS 503

Challenges of Development

3

CS 510/510L

Foundations of Scientific Computing/Foundations of Scientific Computing Lab

3,1

CS 520

Mathematical Modeling

3

CS 550

Digital Image Processing

3

HGEC 550

Principles of Sustainability

3

HGEC 610

Earth Observation and Modeling

3

HGEC 620

Image Processing and Data Analysis

3

HGEC 630

Meteorology, Weather and Climate

3

HGEC 640

Environmental Impact Assessment

3

HGEC 650

Remote Sensing of the Environment

3

total credits

 

31-33

*Option should be declared when the core requirements in the program have been completed.

4+1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Hazards, Global and Environmental Change

The Schmid College of Science and Technology offers an integrated program for undergraduates which enables students to begin taking MS course work in their senior year and receive a MS in hazards, global and environmental change within one year of finishing their undergraduate studies. Thus, students can earn a BS and MS in 5 years. Students can apply to the MS program in the fall of their junior year. Students will receive conditional admission to the program, pending completion of their BS degree as stipulated in the graduate catalog). If accepted to the MS program, students can take up to 12 credits in MS 500-level courses during their senior year. The application process, prerequisites, GPA, and graduate program requirements are as specified for the MS program in hazards, global and environmental change.

A senior-level undergraduate student may enroll in 500-level courses with the permission of the program director. An undergraduate student may enroll in a maximum of 12 credits of 500-level courses that will count towards both the BS and MS degrees. So, for future admission to the (4+1) program, by the end of the senior year, the student should have completed 124 credits including the 12 graduate credits that will be double counted and have at least a 3.000 cumulative GPA to be eligible to complete the master's degree in one additional year.

Crean School of Health and Life Sciences

Janeen Hill, Ph.D., Dean

Professors: Caporaso, Carson, Frisch, Gabard, Griffin, Hill, McKenzie, Prakash, Schandler, Sumida;

Clinical Professor: Biederman;

Associate Professors: Brechter, Brodbeck, Brownell, Cipriani, Glynn, Grant-Beuttler, Peterson, Pincus, Shears, Wellman, Were;

Clinical Associate Professor: Tierney;

Assistant Professors: Boehm, Dana, Frederick, Hahn-Holbrook, Hellberg, Rowland-Goldsmith, Tominaga;

Lecturer: Renault;

Clinical Instructors: Gilliland, Hignojoz, Jonathan;

Research Associate: Takagi.

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

Master of Science in Food Science

Master of Science in Food Science/Master of Business Administration

The School of Health Sciences offers a distinctive blend of graduate programs in the biosciences, behavioral sciences, and health sciences. Programs in the behavioral and health sciences integrate and apply a bio-psycho-social perspective to advance our understanding of health and the education of health care professionals. Programs in the biosciences integrate the knowledge from the basic sciences to develop a comprehensive understanding of life, new technologies, and pressing societal issues. All programs in Crean School are distinguished by their commitment to engage graduate students in their education through faculty-mentored student research, internships, problem-centered learning, and clinical experiences and by their demonstrated excellence in the professional education of graduate students. Finally, the Crean School of Health and Life Sciences connects its diverse disciplines in the classroom by linking behavioral, basic, and social sciences; through select interdisciplinary, and integrative graduate degree programs; and through faculty and student research which focuses on the translation of foundational science knowledge to applications in food science, physical therapy, and marriage and family therapy.

Master of Science in Food Science

Food science is a multidisciplinary discipline that applies scientific concepts to the understanding of the properties of food. Food science is concerned with the application of the physical, biological, and allied sciences to the processing, preservation, packaging, storage, evaluation, and utilization of foods. The food science graduate program at Chapman University prepares students for a variety of careers in the food, nutritional, pharmaceutical and related industries, in government and regulatory agencies, for service organizations and academic institutions.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

An undergraduate degree in food science is not required for admission; because of its basic orientation, the program encourages applicants from a broad range of disciplinary interests. Recently admitted applicants have degrees in chemistry, biology, pharmacy, business, chemical and mechanical engineering as well as food science and nutrition.

Prerequisites

  1. General chemistry with laboratory (two semesters).
  2. Organic chemistry with laboratory (two semesters or one semester organic and one semester biochemistry).
  3. Microbiology with laboratory.
  4. Statistics.
  5. Human nutrition.

Admission to the program may be achieved by completing the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. Students with a BA or BS degree with a major in any of the physical or biological sciences will generally have the necessary prerequisites in chemistry, biology and mathematics. Students with an inadequate background will be required to take prerequisite subjects without credit toward their graduate degree. Prerequisite courses must be completed within the first year of enrollment.
  2. Have achieved a minimum required admission grade point average of 3.000. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores are required. (GMAT scores may be accepted in lieu of GRE). Applicants must achieve a minimum score of 680 or 153 (revised test) on the quantitative section,  500 or 153 (revised test) on the verbal section and a score of 3.5 on the analytical writing section of the general test.
  3. Applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum of 550 (paper-based), or 80 (internet-based).

For further information, please contact the Office of Admission.

Transfer policy

Students admitted to the master of science in food science degree program with an earned master’s degree may transfer up to 6 credits of graduate course work upon approval of a petition by the program coordinator and the dean of the school. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for transfer policies.)

Continuous enrollment fee

Students who have previously registered for the thesis/project but who have not completed the course work are required to submit a continuous enrollment fee for each semester the thesis/project remains outstanding. The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the course work.

Requirements for the degree

1. course work

Thirty semester credits in food science and nutrition-related courses must be completed. Students entering the program without a degree in food science or a food science background will be required to take the food science core courses (11 credits) as part of their 30-credit degree requirements. If the core courses have been taken as an undergraduate at Chapman University or at another academic institution, a student will not be expected to repeat this material. The student would then build a program by selecting courses from the approved list of electives for graduate students in consultation with their advisor. Essentials of Food Science (FSN 500) and Research Methods (FSN 660) are required of all graduate students. Thus, a typical student will take the 11 credit core, 1 credit for Essentials of Food Science, 3 credits for Research Methods, and 15 elective credits.

core courses (11 credits)

FSN 501

Food Chemistry

3

FSN 502

Food Chemistry Lab

1

FSN 520

Food Processing and Preservation

3

FSN 530/530L

Food Microbiology/Food Microbiology Lab

3,1

required courses (4 credits)

FSN 500

Essentials of Food Science

1

FSN 660

Research Methods

3

electives (15 credits)

FSN 503

Government Regulation of Foods

3

FSN 505

Quality Control and Assurance

3

FSN 506

Effective Communications for the Real World Scientist

3

FSN 510

Food Industry Study Tour

3

FSN 512

Sensory Evaluation of Foods

3

FSN 515

Food Ingredients

3

FSN 517

Food Analysis

3

FSN 522

Community Nutrition

3

FSN 538

Nutrition and Human Performance

3

FSN 539

Life Cycle and Clinical Nutrition

3

FSN 540

Food Engineering

3

FSN 560

Current Topics in Food Science and Nutrition

3

FSN 580

Management and Marketing Fundamentals for Food Scientists

3

FSN 594

Food Product Development

3

FSN 600

Advanced Food Science: Selected Topics

3–12

FSN 601

Food Packaging

3

FSN 602

Food Flavors

3

FSN 603

Chemistry and Technology of Fats and Oils

3

FSN 606

Dietary Supplements and Functional Foods

3

FSN 690

Internship for Graduate Students

½–3

FSN 695

Thesis I

3

FSN 696

Thesis II

3

FSN 697

Thesis III

1–3

FSN 699

Independent Research

1–3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

30

2. thesis and non-thesis options

A non-thesis course work option or thesis/research project must be completed.

A.

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 "B" (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines). Students must complete Research Methods (FSN 660) in which they will develop a research proposal or comprehensive review of the literature on a food science topic. Students must also successfully pass an oral comprehensive exam with a faculty panel. The exam will gauge the ability of the student to coherently and analytically integrate knowledge gained from course work and relate it cogently to the selected research topic. Successful completion of course work alone does not assure the candidate of passing the comprehensive exam. Students will have two opportunities to pass the oral comprehensive exam. In addition, students pursuing the non-thesis option need to complete one semester of either Product Development (FSN 594) or an independent study research project.

B.

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 "B" (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines) and be accepted by a faculty member as a research advisee to enroll in the thesis option. Students must complete Research Methods (FSN 660) in which they will develop a research proposal or thesis. Students in the thesis option must complete 30 credits to graduate, including 24 credits of course work and 6 thesis credits (FSN 695 and FSN 696). If additional time is required to complete the thesis, students must register for 1 credit of FSN 697 for each semester the thesis remains outstanding. Students must submit a manuscript for publication and pass a final oral exam given by the oral examination committee. The advisor and graduate student will select three faculty to serve as the oral examination committee. Committee members should be chosen to reflect breadth in the food science discipline and can include appropriate colleagues from outside the program who are familiar with the field of study.

4+1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Food Science

The food science program offers a 4+1 program for that enables undergraduate students to begin taking MS course work in their junior or senior year and receive a masters degree in food science within one year of finishing their undergraduate degree. The program is open to all undergraduate majors as long as they have satisfied the prerequisites for the program and meet admission requirements.

Chapman students can apply to a graduate program in their junior or senior year. Students will receive conditional admission to the program, pending completion of their bachelors degree as stipulated in the graduate catalog (see explanation of conditional admission in the graduate catalog). If accepted into a graduate program, undergraduate students may take up to 12 graduate credits once they have completed 90 undergraduate credits. These 12 credits may also count towards their undergraduate degree credit requirement. Students would complete the remaining credit hours of graduate course work beginning in the semester after receiving the undergraduate degree. The application process, prerequisites, GPA, and graduate program requirements are as specified for the MS program in food science.

Master of Science in Food Science/Master of Business Administration

In conjunction with the Argyros School of Business and Economics, the Chapman University Schmid College of Science and Technology offers a joint program leading to both the MBA and MS in food science degrees. Offered to full-time and part-time students, the program requires acceptance into the Flex MBA program at the Argyros School of Business and Economics and the MS in food science program in the Schmid College of Science and Technology.

Students interested in the dual degree program must meet all admission requirements for each school. Students will make only one financial aid application. Scholarships and grants applicable to each degree will be decided by the separate schools.

Students may apply to the joint program, alternatively, students may also apply to the MBA program during their first year in the food science program, and students may apply to the MSFS program during their first year of study in the Flex MBA program.

Students must satisfy the minimum requirements for each degree program including course requirements, residency, and other requirements listed in the Graduate Catalog. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 "B" or higher in each program. A non-thesis course work option or thesis/research project must be completed.

The dual degree program requires the completion of 65 total credits (as opposed to 80 credits if the two degrees are sought separately and outside the joint program). The School of Business will accept up to 9 of the MSFS credits toward completion of its 50-credit requirement; thus students must complete 41 MBA credits in the Flex MBA program.

The Schmid College of Science and Technology will accept six of MBA credits toward completion of its 30-credit requirement, thus reducing the MSFS requirements to 24 credits (15 credits of required courses and 9 credits of electives).

Food science courses eligible for credit towards the MBA degree (limit of seven credits applied towards the MBA):

FSN 503

Government Regulation of Foods

3

FSN 510

Food Industry Study Tour

3

FSN 560*

Current Topics in Food Science and Nutrition

3

FSN 580

Management and Marketing Fundamentals for Food Scientists

3

FSN 594

Food Product Development

3

FSN 600*

Advanced Food Science: Selected Topics

3–12

FSN 690*

Internship for Graduate Students

½–3

FSN 695*

Thesis I

3

FSN 696*

Thesis II

3

FSN 697*

Thesis III

1–3

FSN 699*

Independent Research

1–3

*Requires approval of Argyros School of Business and Economics Graduate Committee for credits to be applied towards the MBA.

Business courses eligible for credit towards the MSFS degree BUS 605 (Marketing Management) and BUS 606 (Operations and Technology Management) offered by the Argyros School of Business and Economics.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Physical therapists evaluate, educate and provide intervention to patients and clients in order to help prevent, correct and alleviate pain, discomfort and dysfunction brought about by both physical and mental disorders. The responsibilities of the physical therapist also include collaboration with other professionals, teaching, research, administration and consultation. Physical therapy services are provided in such diverse settings as hospitals, out-patient clinics, rehabilitation centers, private practices, voluntary health agencies and home health care agencies, schools for children with disabilities, public schools and sports therapy clinics.

The DPT degree is designed for those individuals who wish to enter the field of physical therapy. The 125-credit program consists of both didactic and clinical courses, which include all content areas expected for accreditation and for eligibility to sit for the licensure exam given by the Physical Therapy Board of California or other states. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (www.apta.org). The program is the oldest continually accredited physical therapy educational program in the country.

Application process and admission requirements

Chapman University's doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program will be using the Physical Therapy Centralized Application System (PTCAS). Applications may be obtained from PTCAS at www.ptcas.org and will be available the year prior to your intended matriculation, beginning each year in June, and will be due in November for fall semester admission and due in March for January admission the following year. Applications received after the November deadline will be considered for the January start date. It is recommended that the GRE examination be taken six weeks prior to the application deadline. The department accepts approximately 48 students each fall semester which begins annually in August. This year, we will begin our January start for approximately 32 students. Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university by the time of matriculation into the DPT program. Chapman University participates in early decision admission which requires a higher grade point average (GPA) and a higher Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score (see below). International applicants must have course work evaluated by an appropriate agency and must hold a degree equivalent to a baccalaureate degree earned in the United States. International applicants also must submit TOEFL scores and financial certification. Contact the international admission officer at Chapman University for specific requirements and additional information.

Grade and Graduate Record Examination requirements

Early decision admission

Early Decision (ED) is a binding option for applicants with demonstrated high academic performance and who desire and early decision from Chapman University. Applicants will be able to apply to only one ED program in PTCAS. In addition to the PTCAS application, applicants must arrange for PTCAS to receive all official U.S. transcripts and fee payment by the ED deadline in August, a year prior to your intended matriculation. If the application, transcripts, or fee arrive after the ED deadline, PTCAS will automatically change the applicant’s file from early decision status to "regular" status. ED applicants will be given priority in the PTCAS verification process. Preference for admissions is given to applicants with the highest GPA and GRE scores. The following criteria are required for early decision admission:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.500 or higher (on a 4.0 scale).
  2. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.500 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) with no course grade below a "C". No more than two science courses and a total of three prerequisite courses may be remaining after the fall semester in which the application is submitted. Applicants with the least remaining prerequisite course work may be given preference over other applicants.
  3. A GRE score is required for Early Decision. The GRE revised General Test was launched in August 2011. Please contact ETS for further information (www.ets.org). The exam must have been taken within the last five years and scores from various test dates are not combined. Early decision applicants MUST take the GRE before July. The minimum acceptable scores for early decision admissions are as follows:

    Minimum Required Scores for Original GRE Exam

    Minimum Required Scores for Revised GRE Exam

Regular admission

The following criteria are required for regular admission:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.0 scale).
  2. Prerequisite (all required courses) GPA of 3.000 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) with no course grade below a "C". No more than two science courses and a total of three prerequisite courses may be remaining after the semester in which the application is submitted. Applicants with the least remaining prerequisite course work may be given preference over other applicants.
  3. A GRE score is required for Regular Admission. The GRE revised General Test was launched in August 2011. Please contact ETS for further information (www.ets.org). GRE scores will be considered relative to the scores of other applicants and the GPAs. The exam must have been taken within the last five years and scores from various test dates are not combined. Applicants must take the GRE in time for the scores to arrive by the application deadline. Students taking the revised GRE test will be expected to have test results equivalent to the old GRE levels. The minimum acceptable scores for regular admissions are as follows:

    Minimum Required Scores for Original GRE Exam

    Minimum Required Scores for Revised GRE Exam

Other requirements for all applicants

  1. Transcripts reflecting the current year’s latest semester grades must be officially submitted by the beginning of January for fall admission, and are required for an admission decision.
  2. Satisfactory completion of 40 hours of observation (or paid work) in different practice settings supervised by physical therapists.
  3. Prerequisite course work as follows (courses taken at institutions that award quarter hour credits must be equivalent to courses with semester hour credits):

Course

Duration

Note

Biology

one course with lab

not Botany

Human Anatomy

one course with lab

within the last five years; mammalian not acceptable

Human Physiology

one course with lab

within the last five years

General Chemistry

one year sequence with labs

introductory course is not acceptable

General Physics

one year sequence with labs

introductory course is not acceptable

Psychology/Human Behavior

two courses

at least six semester hour credits

Statistics

one course

at least three semester hour credits

Chapman University's prerequisite course work is in accordance with the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).

Additional information

  1. All science prerequisite courses must be courses for science majors.
  2. Human anatomy and physiology must have been taken within the last five years. If a combined Anatomy/Physiology course is taken, two semester or three quarter courses are required.
  3. All other prerequisite courses must have been taken within the last 10 years.
  4. Prerequisite courses may be repeated only once; the second grade will then be used to calculate GPA.
  5. Pass/Credit grades for prerequisite courses will be converted to a "C" if letter grading options are not available.
  6. Courses which have received advanced placement credit (AP or CLEP) may fulfill prerequisite requirements. The credit hours and grade points will not be computed in the GPA calculation.
  7. Students who are offered admission are required to financially commit an enrollment deposit of $500. Generally, the deposit must be received within two weeks of notification of admission.
  8. All remaining prerequisite course work and the awarding of a baccalaureate degree must occur before the student matriculates.
  9. Students must satisfactorily complete all remaining prerequisite course requirements in accordance with the admission requirements.
  10. Accepted students are required to meet technical standards and specific health requirements (such as physical examinations and vaccinations). Information on these standards and requirements, as well as such information as program costs, financial aid and acceptance and matriculation rates may be found on the department’s website at www.chapman.edu/scst/crean-school-health/physical-therapy/index.aspx.
  11. Chapman University considers all applicants without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, special needs, veteran status or any other characteristic protected by applicable state or federal civil rights laws. Some information requested in the application is requested for federal or accreditation reporting and will not be used in a discriminatory manner.
  12. Persons who have been dismissed from another physical therapy program are not eligible for consideration for admission to Chapman University.
  13. Applicants who decline or are denied admission may reapply in any subsequent year. Admission requirements are subject to change, and admission in one year does not guarantee admission in any subsequent year.
  14. Persons who have been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor may not be eligible for licensure in any or some states even after successful completion of a physical therapy program. Contact the appropriate state licensing board for additional information.

Exceptions

Applicants who do not meet minimum GPAs or GRE scores, specific prerequisite course requirements or the five- or ten-year time frame for specific courses may seek an exception. A written request stating the extenuating circumstances supporting the exception should be submitted with the application or within ten days of notification that the requirements are not met. Students who feel they were denied admission due to an error, or feel they were treated arbitrarily or capriciously should appeal to the chairperson.

Ethical and professional standards

Students enrolled in the professional curriculum must sign a statement to agree to abide by the APTA Code of Ethics, APTA Guide for Professional Conduct, (found on the APTA website at www.apta.org), and Chapman University’s Standards of Academic Integrity (see Handbook for Physical Therapy Students on the department's website). Students also must acknowledge their ability to carry out the technical standards and essential functions of the physical therapy curriculum at the time of matriculation into the program.

The DPT program involves preparing people to work with the public. The faculty assumes the responsibility for reasonably assuring that individuals who complete the program are not only academically competent but also aware and capable of functioning within the established ethical and professional standards of the profession. The department has both the right and obligation to continually evaluate students, and if necessary, to dismiss students based on these standards as well as academic performance expectations. This philosophy is consistent with other physical therapy programs, which are engaged explicitly or implicitly in certifying that their graduates are competent to engage in the practice of physical therapy.

Candidate dismissal by the department

A student may be dismissed from the Department and the University for reasons of professional, academic or clinical performance, clinical or personal misconduct, or violation(s) of the Academic Integrity Policy. Prior to dismissal, efforts will be made by the faculty to assist the student in removing areas of deficiency. If such assistance does not result in improved performance to an acceptable level, the student can be dismissed from the program. The chair will make final decisions of dismissal following consultation with the faculty. Students are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.000 on all course work within the curriculum. Clinical misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, unsafe practices that might endanger the patient, the student, or the therapist. Personal misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, actions that are intended to berate the patients, peers, faculty, department, or the profession. Any candidate dismissed by the department has the right to appeal the decision according to the University Student Grievance and Due Process policy. The student shall continue in the program until the appeal process is exhausted. If the decision for dismissal stands following his/her appeal, the student will be dismissed from the department and the university.

Requirements for the degree

The following credits must be completed for degree conferral. (The curriculum is subject to change, and students will be notified by the department.)

required courses

PT 510

Functional Human Anatomy I

4

PT 510L

Functional Human Anatomy I Laboratory

PT 511/

Biomechanics of Human Movement

2

PT 511L

Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab

1

PT 512

Kinesiological Motion Analysis

PT 512L

Kinesiology Lab

½

PT 513

Developmental Anatomy

1

PT 515

Applied Human Physiology

4

PT 515L

Applied Human Physiology Laboratory

1

PT 521

Applied Neurophysiology

3

PT 522

Functional Human Neuroanatomy I

PT 522L

Functional Human Neuroanatomy I Laboratory

½

PT 523

Functional Human Neuroanatomy II

PT 523L

Functional Human Neuroanatomy II Laboratory

½

PT 525

Clinical Pathology: General Medicine

3

PT 526

Clinical Pathology: Orthopedic

3

PT 527

Clinical Pathology: Neurology

3

PT 530

Physical Therapy Examination

4

PT 531

General Medicine Practice Management

2

PT 531L

General Medicine Practice Management Laboratory

2

PT 535

Musculoskeletal Practice Management I: Lower Quarter

5

PT 539

Physical Agents

3

PT 591

Clinical Practicum I

1

PT 610

Functional Human Anatomy II

2

PT 638

Musculoskeletal Practice Management II: Upper Quarter

4

PT 640

Neurological Practice Management

5

PT 641

Rehabilitation Practice Management

4

PT 643

Motor Control and Motor Learning

2

PT 643L

Motor Control and Motor Learning Laboratory

1

PT 646

Cardiopulmonary Practice Management

3

PT 647

Pediatric Practice Management

2

PT 647L

Pediatric Practice Management Laboratory

1

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1–3

PT 651

Scientific Inquiry II

3

PT 665

Diagnostic Imaging

2

PT 670

Cultural Diversity and Psychology of Health Care

PT 671

Physical Therapy Ethics

3

PT 691

Clinical Practicum II

1

PT 712

Pharmacology

PT 738

Advanced Patient/Client Management and Therapeutic Exercise

PT 742

Geriatric Practice Management

3

PT 748

Wellness and Complementary Medicine

2

PT 771

Responsible Leadership and Administration

4

PT 782

Applied Administration

2

PT 799

Research or Individual Study in Physical Therapy

1

one of the following (6 credits)

PT 692

Clinical Experience I

6

PT 693A & 693B

Clinical Experience IA & IB

3,3

one of the following (6 credits)

PT 793

Clinical Experience II

6

PT 794A & 794B

Clinical Experience IIA & IIB

3,3

one of the following (6 credits)

PT 795

Clinical Experience III

6

PT 796A & 796B

Clinical Experience IIIA & IIIB

3,3

PT 796A & 796C

Clinical Experience IIIA & IIIC

3,3

PT 796A & 796I

Clinical Experience IIIA & International Clinical Experience

3,3

capstone requirement

Students are required to complete a successful capstone project before graduation. This requirement shall be fulfilled by completing the course sequence below.

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1

PT 650

Scientific Inquiry I

1

PT 651

Scientific Inquiry II

2

PT 799

Research or Individual Study in Physical Therapy

½

PT 799

Research or Individual Study in Physical Therapy

½

total credits (subject to change)

 

125

Clinical experiences

The student must satisfactorily complete the clinical experiences in semesters V, VII, and IX. A minimum of 240 full-time clock hours are included in each 3-credit block.

Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy

The post-professional or transitional doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree is designed to give all practicing physical therapists the opportunity to meet the professional goal of doctoral education. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has a vision sentence stating that by 2020, physical therapy will be provided by doctors of physical therapy. This program emphasizes self-assessment of current professional competencies resulting in the development of a curricular plan to address identified needs. The program combines on-line and weekend, non-traditional courses.

Admission requirements

  1. Academic degree:
    1. A degree from an accredited physical therapist program in the United States.
    2. Or a substantially equivalent degree from a foreign institution.
    3. Or a degree in another field and a license to practice physical therapy.
  2. Transcripts from the physical therapy program reflecting a grade point average of 3.000.
  3. Current license to practice in the United States.
  4. Application form, resume and application fee.
  5. Computer resources and skills sufficient for participation in on-line courses.

Program costs

Tuition and fees are set by university policy. Tuition for 2012-2013 is $425 per credit ($400 per credit for alumni). Chapman clinical faculty/instructors should ask about a special discount. Please contact the department for additional information. The program is designed to be flexible to allow students to enroll in 1-2 courses at a time. Rates are subject to change.

DPT curriculum (Post-Professional/Transitional Tract)

All students complete a professional self-assessment as the first step of the program. The results of the self-assessment portfolio allow students and a faculty advisor to determine an individual course of study. Students who provide evidence of attainment of expected competencies may elect to be exempted from a maximum of six credit hours and from one or more of the core courses. Elective courses are available, and students may transfer a maximum of six semester credit hours of graduate course work from accredited institutions with approval of the faculty advisor.

The program may be completed by students with prior baccalaureate degree or a certificate or a master’s degree. Students with a baccalaureate degree or a certificate complete 25 credits. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours of graduate course work must be completed for the tDPT degree for physical therapists with a baccalaureate degree. Students with a master’s degree complete 23 credits. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours of graduate course work must be completed for the tDPT degree at Chapman University for physical therapists with a master’s degree.

requirements for students holding a baccalaureate degree*

core courses (19 credits)

PT 702

Principles of Evidence Based Practice

1

PT 710

Diagnostic Imaging

3

PT 711

Applied Pharmacology

3

PT 720

Screening Examinations

3

PT 721

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

2

PT 722

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

2

PT 723

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

2

PT 725

Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

3

 

Scientific Inquiry and Physical Therapy

2

electives** (6 credits)

These will be determined and approved in consultation with the department chair.

total credits

 

25

requirements for students holding a master's degree*

core courses (19 credits)

PT 702

Principles of Evidence Based Practice

1

PT 710

Diagnostic Imaging

3

PT 711

Applied Pharmacology

3

PT 720

Screening Examinations

3

PT 721

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

2

PT 722

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

2

PT 723

Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

2

PT 725

Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

3

electives** (4 credits)

These will be determined and approved in consultation with the department chair.

total credits

 

23

*Students may be able to place out of courses with evidence of mastery of material.

** If the student's portfolio shows inadequate experience in any of the areas below, the electives may become required courses.

Bridge Program: Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences and Doctor of Physical Therapy

This program guarantees excellent students a seat in Chapman University’s doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program and makes them eligible for scholarship money awarded to outstanding, incoming DPT students.

Admission requirements

Students eligible for early, admission into Chapman University's doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program must meet the following criteria:

  1. Bachelor of science in health sciences core courses (BIOL 204, 210, 365, 366, CHEM 140, 150, PHYS 107, 108, and PSY 203):
    1. Must be taken at Chapman University;
    2. May only be taken once;
    3. Must be taken for a letter grade;
    4. Must be completed by the end of the spring semester of the junior year;
    5. Must compute total core GPA > 3.5.
  2. Before October 1 of the junior year, the student seeking early admission must schedule an interview with the DPT admissions coordinator, to review requirements and establish a plan to complete successfully the requirements for early admission.
  3. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) must be taken before the beginning of the senior year with the following minimum scores earned:

    Minimum Required Scores for Original GRE Exam

    Minimum Required Scores for Revised GRE Exam

  4. Students meeting the stated requirements will be admitted to the DPT program in the early fall of their senior year on a conditional basis until the following criteria for admission are complete.
    1. 40 physical therapy observational/experience hours are completed and documented.
    2. All BS health science degree requirements are completed and degree bestowed by the university.
    3. Cumulative GPA at graduation > 3.5.
  5. Students must submit an application through PTCAS by the early decision deadline in August; decisions will be awarded in September.

Students admitted to the Bridge Program will be eligible for competitive scholarship awards.

Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy

The Crean School of Health and Life Sciences offers a master of arts degree in marriage and family therapy designed to provide the student with the academic and professional training necessary for a career in marriage and family therapy (MFT). This MFT program may also serve as a foundation for further graduate study in psychology or one of the related disciplines. The program includes a substantial clinical training component in which students work under the supervision of School faculty and staff in a counseling setting, either in the clinic sponsored by the School or at some other approved site. Students in this program complete a minimum of 60 semester credits.

Admission deadlines

The admission deadlines are February 1 (financial aid deadline) for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester.

Admission to the program

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  2. Have an cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.000 or better. Applicants with a grade point average between 2.500 and 2.990 are required to submit the following: Graduate Record Examination (GRE): a minimum score of 153 on the verbal section, 146 on the quantitative section, and 5.0 on the analytical writing section.
  3. Submit one set of official transcripts from the degree granting institution.
  4. Submit a personal statement which must be no more than three double spaced typed pages in length and address educational (paid/volunteer) and/or personal experiences that have shaped your career objectives and prepared you to begin graduate studies in marriage and family therapy. This essay is evaluated by the psychology faculty for content and as a sample of your writing abilities.
  5. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals actively engaged in teaching and/or clinical practice, who are in a position to evaluate your academic and personal qualifications for the program. The School may contact the authors of recommendations to discuss your qualifications.
  6. Complete the application for admission and the non-discrimination policy and licensure notification.
  7. Submit a resume or curriculum vitae.

Completed online applications are initially reviewed by the Office of Graduate Admission. The applications on file are forwarded to the MFT program where they are reviewed by a committee of graduate faculty. Applicant files are carefully read and reviewed for fit with the program’s educational goals and training. Due to the volume of qualified applicants, not all applicants will receive an offer letter.

Course Work Program

The program manager evaluates the student’s transcripts and program application materials and, if the student is qualified and approved for admission, prepares a plan of study indicating the student’s status at the university, any program prerequisites still to be completed, and the courses constituting the program emphasis. Any courses accepted for transfer into the program are also identified. Questions about prerequisites, program requirements, transfer credits, etc. should be discussed and resolved with the program manager at the time the course work program is created to avoid later confusion.

Advisement

Newly admitted students are required to meet with the program manager to discuss and clarify any questions about the program and future career plans after acceptance to the program. Students are required to meet with the program manager prior to beginning the program to develop a written plan of study. Students are also strongly encouraged to meet with the program manager before registering for classes each semester.

Transfer policy

Students admitted to the MFT degree program may transfer up to 6 credits of graduate course work from another graduate program upon approval of a petition by the program director and the dean of the school. This policy includes graduate-level classes from regionally accredited universities. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for transfer policies.)

Graduate prerequisites

The applicant must possess a bachelor’s degree in psychology from an accredited college or university, or must show evidence of satisfactory academic background in all of the following:

  1. Abnormal psychology or child abnormal psychology.
  2. Child psychology or adolescent psychology or developmental psychology.
  3. Learning theory or cognitive psychology or physiological psychology.
  4. Personality theory or social psychology.
  5. Research methods in psychology or psychological assessment.
  6. Statistics.

Students must be enrolled in or have completed 4 of the 6 required prerequisite courses by the admission deadline. All prerequisites must be met by the time the student has completed his or her first semester.

Ethical and professional standards

Since the MFT program involves preparing people to work with the public, the department assumes the responsibility for reasonably assuring that individuals who complete the program are not only academically competent but are aware and capable of functioning within the established ethical and professional standards of the profession. Students in the MFT graduate program must adhere to the ethical standards held and enforced by the relevant professional associations and should understand that they are being trained in a program that is not only academic, but also professional in nature.

The university has both the right and obligation to evaluate continually and, if necessary, to terminate the student’s participation in the master’s program at any point for ethical violations and/or personal unsuitability for the profession. This philosophy is consistent with that of most graduate programs that are engaged in explicitly or implicitly certifying that their graduates are competent to engage in the practice of professional counseling or psychotherapy.

Candidate dismissal

A student may be dismissed from the program and the university for reasons of academic or clinical performance, clinical or personal misconduct, or violation(s) of the Academic Integrity Policy. Prior to dismissal, efforts will be made by the graduate faculty to assist with the student’s area of deficiency. If such assistance does not result in improved performance to an acceptable level, the student can be dismissed from the program. This dismissal would follow the recommendation of a simple majority vote of the graduate program faculty. Academic conditions suitable for dismissal are addressed above. Clinical misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, unsafe practices that might endanger either the client or the therapist- personal misconduct that warrants dismissal includes, but is not limited to, actions that are intended to berate the clients, peers, faculty, staff, or the profession. Any candidate dismissed by the graduate program faculty has the right to appeal the decision according to the University Student Grievance and Due Process policy. The student shall continue in the program until the appeal process is exhausted. If the decision for dismissal stands following his or her appeal, the student will be dismissed from the department and the university.

Screening

Screenings with faculty will be conducted as needed based on faculty evaluation. In the screening interview, a preliminary assessment of the student’s academic, intellectual, and psychological readiness for a career as a therapist will be made.

Advancement to candidacy

During the semester before students plan to begin the first practicum, they should notify the program manager of their intent to go through advancement to candidacy. Regularly scheduled advancements take place three times a year—once in the fall semester (typically in November), once in the spring semester (typically in April), and once during the summer. Advancement candidates must have satisfactorily completed or be successfully completing PSY 516, 541, 556, 561, 565, 570, 573, 578, and 583, and a minimum of 40 credits. To qualify for advancement to candidacy, students must be in good academic standing. Students who are on academic probation cannot sit for advancement. Students on academic probation may petition to advance each semester. Approval of the petition will only be awarded by a unanimous vote of the graduate faculty. At the advancement to candidacy interview, students will meet with a faculty committee. It will be that committee’s responsibility to determine whether students are then prepared to be formally declared a candidate for a master of arts degree and be permitted to proceed into the practicum phase of the program. Students who fail advancement to candidacy three times will be dismissed from the program.

At the time of the advancement interview, each student will be provided with a clinical vignette. The student will discuss a diagnosis and a tentative treatment plan, which will be the foundation of the advancement interview. The treatment plan will address identification of problems, proposed interventions, ethical issues, prognosis, further assessment, and any clinical issues that may need further attention. Specifically, the functions of the advancement to candidacy committee are:

  1. To assess the student’s readiness to begin practicum.
  2. To provide information and counsel to the student in matters pertaining to his or her academic progress and plans.
  3. To ascertain whether significant gaps exist in the student’s knowledge and/or understanding of the subject field.
  4. To apprise the student of any academic, professional or ethical aspects of the program that may be a source of concern.
  5. To assess the student’s psychological readiness and personal suitability to engage in the profession of marriage and family therapy.
  6. To review the student’s academic status with respect to fulfilling required course work in a satisfactory manner.

Successful advancement to candidacy is a prerequisite to enrolling in practicum.

Personal therapy

Participating as a client in individual or group therapy is an important educational aspect of a program to prepare mental health professionals. Experience as a client in personal therapy is, therefore, one of the program requirements. The requirement is met through a minimum of sixteen hours of individual or group therapy conducted by a licensed marriage and family therapist, licensed clinical social worker, licensed clinical psychologist, or board-eligible psychiatrist. Verification will consist of a letter by the therapist (on the therapist’s letterhead) stating the time spent in therapy, sent directly to the program manager. This verification must be on file at the time the student applies for graduation.

Personal therapy may at any time be required by the department for the student to continue in the program. Commencement of therapy or recommendation of additional therapy may be a stipulation or condition at the time of a student’s screening or advancement to candidacy interview. The student has the right to choose his or her own therapist for this requirement within the limitations of ethical standards prohibiting dual relationships and the criteria of the paragraph above.

Practicum

Minimum requirements for beginning practicum include:

  1. Advancement to candidacy.
  2. A minimum of 40 completed credits of program course work.
  3. Completion of site agreement (for approved off-site practicum training).

Students who pursue off-site practicum training must seek approval by the associate clinic director before the proposed starting date. The student should obtain the required forms from the program manager well in advance of the deadline to enable him/her to fully comply with the requirements for the practicum and to deal with any special problems or circumstances that may affect the acceptability of the proposed practicum site.

Comprehensive examination

Students enrolled in the marriage and family therapy program must take and pass a comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination covers six core competency areas that are reflective of the areas required for state licensure as a marriage and family therapist. The examination is administered each year, in September and in February. Students are required to take the examination immediately following their advancement to practicum. Study packets are available and contain information about the examination, study preparation ideas, and an explanation of how the examination is scored. A passing score in the corresponding courses does not assure the student a passing grade on the examination. In the event that the student does not attain a passing score on the examination, he or she must repeat the entire examination. Three failures to obtain a passing grade on the examination are grounds for dismissal from the program. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines.)

Thesis option

The marriage and family therapy program offers students the option to complete an empirical thesis. This option is offered to students who achieved an undergraduate GPA of 3.000 or better and have taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) with minimum scores of 153 on the verbal section, 146 on the quantitative section, and 5.0 on the analytical writing section. Students can only complete a thesis if they find a faculty sponsor who has agreed to be their committee supervisor, and two additional faculty who have agreed to serve as thesis committee members. During their first semester in the program, students must petition the program director in writing, stating the title of the project and the name of the faculty who has agreed to serve as thesis supervisor. By the end of the second semester of the program, students must have submitted and successfully defended a written thesis proposal. This proposal must be approved by the thesis committee. Students who complete a thesis will be expected to complete all other MFT program requirements with the exception of PSY 532. During the third and fourth semesters in the program, students will enroll in PSY 697 and 698 and will continue to enroll in PSY 698 until the successful defense of the thesis.

Continuous enrollment fee

The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the course work.

Requirements for the degree

theoretical foundation (12 credits)

PSY 541

Systems of Psychotherapy for Marriage and Family Therapists

3

PSY 556

Systems Theory and Family Therapy

3

PSY 561

Couple Therapy

3

PSY 583

Advanced Theoretical Applications

3

clinical courses (14 credits)

PSY 516

Assessment of Individuals and Families

2

PSY 565

Diagnosis and Treatment of Children and Adolescents

3

PSY 570

Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis

3

PSY 573

Crisis Management and Clinical Process

3

PSY 605

Group Therapy

3

specialized clinical courses (7 credits)

PSY 533

Psychopharmacology for Marriage and Family Therapists

3

PSY 582

Assessment and Treatment Sexual Disorders

2

PSY 588

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse

2

family development, diversity, and client advocacy (9 credits)

PSY 610

Family Life Cycle and Aging

3

PSY 618

Multicultural Issues in Therapy

3

PSY 620

Public Mental Health

3

professional issues, ethics, and research (6 credits)

PSY 532

Research and Bibliographic Methods

3

PSY 578

Ethical and Professional Issues for Marriage and Family Therapists

3

clinical practicum (12 credits)

PSY 694

Practicum I (taken over 3 consecutive semesters)

4,4,4

total credits

 

60

optional list of electives

PSY 535

Research Design and Analysis

3

PSY 595

Topic Courses in Marriage and Family Therapy

3

PSY 599

Independent Study

1–3

PSY 689

Practicum II

1–3

PSY 697

Master’s Thesis Research I

3

PSY 698

Master’s Thesis Research II

3

PSY 699

Independent Study

3

Course Descriptions - Computational Science

CS 500 Computational Science Seminars

Prerequisites, CS 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. Students are introduced to various topics covering computational science and other related topics by attending research oriented seminars. This seminar series is intended to be capstone experience. Seminars presented by faculty, invited speakers, and students; topics vary from semester to semester. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

CS 510 Foundations of Scientific Computing

Prerequisites, CPSC 230, 231. This course will provide foundations and concepts on scientific computation. It emphasizes the role of computation as a fundamental tool of discovery in the department of science, and will cover some of the methods, techniques and tools used in this field. This course provides an overview of computer hardware, software, and numerical methods that are useful on scientific workstations and supercomputers. Topics include high-performance computer architectures, software tools and packages, characteristics of commonly used numerical methods, graphical presentation of results, and performance analysis and improvement. Several individual programming assignments will be completed in this course, as well as exams. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CS 520 Mathematical Modeling

Prerequisites, MATH 211, 350. Mathematical modeling will concentrate on the process of developing mathematical descriptions of physical phenomenon. The main goal of this course is to learn how to make a creative use of some mathematical tools, such as difference equations, ordinary differential equations, and numerical analysis, to build a mathematical description of some physical problems. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CS 530 Scientific Databases and Data Mining

Prerequisite, CS 510. This course will cover databases and information retrieval concepts with applications to scientific computing. Database organizations including relational and object-oriented will be surveyed. Requirements for scientific databases in applied and fundamental sciences will be presented. Data mining techniques including classification, clustering, association rule mining, and other related machine learning techniques will be covered. Data grids and federation concepts will be introduced. Examples of scientific databases including those from genomics, astrophysics, remote sensing, and earth science will be discussed. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CS 531 Computational Economics

(Same as CPSC 430, MGSC 530.) Prerequisites, MATH 110 and either CPSC 230, or 236, or consent of instructor. This course will introduce students to the computational tools required to understand electronic exchange systems and implement economic experiments. Students will be required to become familiar with numerical analysis, computer simulation, and programming of experiments. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

CS 540 High-Performance Computing

Prerequisite, CS 510. This course covers the basic concepts and techniques needed for problem solving using parallel computers. It will introduce the students to high-performance computer architectures, their taxonomies and performance issues. The design and analysis of parallel algorithms will be covered. Techniques for data and workload partitioning for parallel execution will be discussed. It will also introduce parallel programming models and contemporary parallel programming techniques including message passing and shared memory. Cluster, grid and cloud computing will be introduced. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CS 550 Digital Image Processing

Prerequisites, MATH 210, 211. This course provides an overview of the main concepts, results, and techniques that are the foundations of current academic research and industry practice in digital image processing. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 560 Applied Partial Differential Equations

Prerequisites, MATH 210, 350. Students will learn how to solve certain types of Partial Differential Equations. They will study the general theory of PDEs, as well as methods of solving linear and non-linear PDEs. Students will also learn how to solve equations that come from the world of physics and other sciences. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 570 Advanced Numerical Methods

Prerequisite, MATH 454. Students study and come to understand several advanced methods of numerical computation as used in 3d modeling, simulations, and solution of partial differential equations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 599 Individual Study

Prerequisites, admission to CS MS program and consent of instructor. Directed reading and/or research designed to meet specific needs of graduate students. Topics to be selected by mutual agreement of students and faculty. (Offered every semester.) 1–6 credits.

CS 610 Models of Computing

Prerequisites, equivalent of MATH 211, CPSC 406. In this course, students will study the mathematical models of computing from a contemporary perspective. The course will explore the connections between classical automata, operational and denotational semantics, and contemporary models of quantum computing. The theory developed in the course will be applied to specific known problems, e.g., in control theory (finite automata), real number computing (operational and denotations models), and cryptography (quantum computing). (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 620 Foundations in Mathematical Bioscience

Prerequisites, MATH 110, BIOL 208, CHEM 330, or consent of instructor. Computational science is an emerging field of the sciences, computer science, and mathematics. This course is to provide the fundamentals of computational science, and introduce a variety of scientific applications in bioscience. We will examine how scientific investigations involve computing in basic biosciences such as physics, chemistry, medicine, and particularly biosciences. It covers selected topics in physiology, biochemistry, and behavior. It may include biochemical reaction kinetics, the Hodgkin Huxley model for cellular electrical activity, continuous and discrete population interactions, and neural network models of learning. Techniques utilized include ordinary differential equations, difference equations, algebraic equations, and computer simulations. The student will be offered examples of computer simulations and data analysis. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CS 621 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I

Prerequisite, BIOL 208, or CHEM 230. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts behind Bioinformatics and Computational Biology tools. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources. This course introduces students to the practical application of structure and sequence analysis, database searching and molecular modeling techniques to study protein sequence, structure and function. Amino acid properties and protein secondary structures will be reviewed as supporting information for understanding the importance of protein sequence. Internet resources, molecular visualization software, and computational algorithms will be introduced to the student for structure analysis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 622 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology II

Prerequisite, CS 621. Students will be introduced to the advanced concepts behind Bioinformatics and Computational Biology tools. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources related to developing and building websites, machine learning, data mining and genomics applications. Students will gain practical knowledge in using software techniques and internet resources to handle and compare biological, genomic and medical information. search databases and interpret protein structure. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits

CS 623 Computational Systems Biology

Prerequisites, BIOL 208, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Computational Systems Biology is to understand complex biological systems that require the integration of experimental and computational research. This course aims to develop and use efficient algorithms, data structures, and visualization and communication tools to orchestrate the integration of large quantities of biological data with the goal of computer modeling of biological systems. Students will learn how to use computer simulations of biological systems to analyze as well as visualize the complex connections of such systems and cellular processes. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CS 624 Biostatistics

Prerequisite, MATH 203, or equivalent. This course will provide an intermediate-level introduction to various statistical methods with emphasis on applications in Biology, Medicine, and Public Health. Main concepts such as sampling distributions, contingency tables, survival analysis, linear, logistic, and Poisson regressions will be studied from a more mathematically solid viewpoint. Examples and real datasets will be provided to clarify the concepts and underline connections with related topics and current research. Data analyses will be performed using the statistical software package R. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 625 Bioinformatics Algorithms

Prerequisites, BIOL 330, CPSC 406, or equivalent. Bioinformatics is the study of living organisms viewed as information processors. Students will study some of the major algorithms used in bioinformatics: sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, phylogeny, gene identification, and analysis of gene expression data. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 630 Data Mining and Information Retrieval

Prerequisite, CS 530. An introduction to the core algorithms and techniques of machine learning and information retrieval with emphasis on application to biology and chemistry. Specific topics include text information retrieval, multimedia information retrieval, data visualization, classification, and clustering. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 635 BioMedical Informatics

(Same as CPSC 435.) Prerequisite, CS 510. Students are introduced to contemporary research topics in medical informatics, including computational techniques for the collection, management, retrieval, and analysis of biomedical data. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 650 Advanced Linear Algebra and Digital Signal Processing

Prerequisites, MATH 210, 211. This course gives students an exposure to advanced topics in linear algebra and their applications to digital signal processing. Using vector space methods, this course provides an overview of the main concepts, results, and techniques that are the foundations of current academic research and industry practice in digital signal processing. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 660 Fourier Analysis

Prerequisites, MATH 211, 450. Periodic functions and Fourier series, convergence of Fourier series, Fourier transform of rapidly decreasing functions and L2 functions, Inversion formula and Plancherel theorems, application of the Fourier transform to differential equations, Multiresolution analysis, and orthonormal wavelet bases, signal, and image compression. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 664 Research Topics in Computational Science

Prerequisites, admission to CS MS program, CS 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. This course will be an applied project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable paper in a major conference in Computational Science or preferably a journal paper. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CS 665 Capstone Project (Directed Reading)

Prerequisites, admission to CS MS program, CS 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. This course will be reading project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable technical report. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CS 680 Computational Algebra I

Prerequisite, MATH 211. A course in multivariate polynomials, their algebraic properties, and related algorithms for effective computations. After an introduction of the main concepts of the ring of single variable polynomials (polynomial ideals, unique factorization, division algorithm, similarities with the ring of integers), multivariable polynomials are defined. The course addresses the problem of defining order relations on the set of multivariate terms, and moves to the basic concepts of the theory of Gröbner bases. These include: the multivariate division algorithm as a generalization of the Gauss reduction algorithm for vector spaces; the Macaulay Basis theorem; viewing polynomials as rewrite rules; Buchberger's algorithms for the construction of Gröbner bases for polynomial ideals; and the notion of syzygy. Throughout the course, students learn how to use a computer algebra software program to compute with polynomials and to implement the algorithms presented in class. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 697 Thesis

Prerequisites, admission to MS CS program, completion of 12 graduate credits, consent of instructor. Students will complete a research project chosen and completed under guidance of a faculty member and/or faculty committee. The project will result in an acceptable technical report (Thesis) and an oral defense. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

CS 770 Topics in Computational Science

Prerequisites, CS 520, 530, 540. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CS 797 Dissertation Research

Prerequisite, advancement to candidacy in the Ph.D. in computational science program. Dissertation research is an independent study that culminates in a doctoral dissertation. Students must be enrolled continually for at least 1 credit of CS 797 for their dissertation defense. Grading: P/NP. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credits. (Offered every semester.) 1–6 credits.

CS 799 Doctoral Studies

Prerequisite, advancement to candidacy. This is an individual study course for doctoral students. Content to be determined by the student and the student's Doctoral Committee. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Environmental Science

ENV 550 Principles of Sustainability

Astronauts are awed by both Earth’s beauty and its vulnerability. Can we become better environmental stewards? Is it necessary? This course will address environmental “sustainability” and develop student interdisciplinary skills in connecting ideas, thinking critically, and tolerating the ambiguity that results from alternative views. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Food Science

FSN 500 Essentials of Food Science

Prerequisite, admission to the food science graduate program. An introduction to the multidisciplinary nature of the food science via analysis of relevant case studies. The role of industry, government agencies, service organizations, and academic institutions in supplying safe and wholesome foods to consumers is explained. Relevant career paths for graduates are explored. To be completed during the first year of study. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

FSN 501 Food Chemistry

Prerequisite, CHEM 330. Corequisite, FSN 502. Students study the chemistry of proteins, lipids, enzymes, carbohydrates, etc. as it relates to the composition, preservation, processing, stability, flavor, and nutritional characteristics of foods. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 502 Food Chemistry Lab

Corequisite, FSN 501. A laboratory study of the chemistry of proteins, lipids, enzymes, carbohydrates, etc. as it relates to the composition, preservation, processing, stability, flavor, and nutritional characteristics of foods. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

FSN 503 Government Regulation of Foods

Students examine the rules and regulations of various governmental agencies with regard to the processing, packaging, labeling, and marketing of food products. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 505 Quality Control and Assurance

Students apply physical, chemical, microbiological, organoleptic, and statistical methods to the evaluation of critical properties (i.e., color, flavor, texture, nutrients, stability, and safety) of ingredients and commercial food products. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 506 Effective Communications for the Real World Scientist

This hands-on course is designed to improve the oral and written communication skills required of a scientist throughout their career. Students will write and critique peer-reviewed publications, practice grant writing, and explore a scientist’s role in effective advertisements, journalism, and consumer dialogue. Effective, efficient, and appropriate use of technical communication tools, including emails, product specifications, product recalls, agendas, and team meetings will be reviewed. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 510 Food Industry Study Tour

A study tour of Southern California food processors and allied industries to develop a more thorough understanding of how basic food technology principles are applied to the manufacture of commercial food products. Lecture, laboratory. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

FSN 512 Sensory Evaluation of Foods

Prerequisite, MATH 203. Students learn the principles and methodology involved in the sensory testing of food products. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 515 Food Ingredients

Students evaluate food supplements, preservatives, and other additives designed to improve the acceptability, stability, and nutritional properties of processed food products. Practical aspects of improving existing products and formulating new food products are emphasized. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 517 Food Analysis

Prerequisites, CHEM 230, food science major. Designed to acquaint the students with the principles and application of physical and chemical methods for the separation, characterization, and quantitative analysis of food constituents. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 520 Food Processing and Preservation

Microbiology and biochemistry of food spoilage, engineering techniques of food processing and preservation, and food plant sanitation; representative methods of food processing and preservation. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 522 Community Nutrition

Prerequisite, FSN 200. Study of the roles and resources of community/public health nutrition professionals promoting wellness in the community. Assessment of community nutritional needs, and planning, implementing and evaluating nutrition education programs for various age groups under different socio-economic conditions. The legislative process, health care insurance industry, and domestic food assistance programs will also be covered. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 529 Experimental Course

Experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest and may be repeated for credit if course content is different. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

FSN 530 Food Microbiology

Prerequisite, BIOL 417. Corequisite, FSN 530L. Students study the microorganisms specifically related to the fermentation, preservation, stability, safety, and flavor of foods. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 530L Food Microbiology Lab

Prerequisite, BIOL 417. Corequisite, FSN 530. Lab component of FSN 530. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

FSN 531 Special Topics in Nutrition

Prerequisite, depends on the topic being offered. Students discuss current issues in the field of nutrition. Topics may include concepts and controversy, eating disorders, cultural aspects of foods, nutrient interactions, and effects of processing on foods. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 538 Nutrition and Human Performance

Prerequisite, FSN 200. Designed to provide a more in depth view of nutrition, metabolism, and human performance. Ergogenic aids, blood doping, and nutritional needs of the athlete will be emphasized. The methodologies and current topics related to nutrition and human performance will be evaluated. Mechanisms of nutrition will be presented to better understand the cause and effect of human nutrition. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 539 Life Cycle and Clinical Nutrition

Prerequisite, FSN 200. The human body has different nutrient requirements at different times during the life-cycle and when in a diseased state. This course explores the physiological changes, adaptations, and stresses that affect nutritional status and explains the influence of dietary practices in maximizing growth, maintenance, and health. Nutrition counseling and diet analyses are included. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 540 Food Engineering

A survey of engineering concepts and unit operations as applied to food processing. Students examine conveying and washing of foods, fluid flow, evaporation, drying, extraction, mixing, freezing, distillation, and filtration. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 560 Current Topics in Food Science and Nutrition

Food science and nutrition are dynamic fields of inquiry and every year new areas of research emerge. The safety of our food, the environmental impacts of processing, and the sustainability of our food supply are being questioned. This course will provide an in-depth examination of current topics of interest in the areas of food safety, quality, processing, and nutrition. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 580 Managing and Marketing Fundamentals for Food Scientists

An introductory course in the fundamentals of management and marketing, designed for those food science majors who have no academic background in these areas. The objectives of the course include the accelerated learning of introductory management theory and a survey of basic marketing structures and functions as they apply to the food industry. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 594 Food Product Development

Students incorporate the principles taught in the food science and nutrition core courses and apply them to the theoretical and practical considerations of commercial food product development. Teams of students will complete real food product development projects solicited from the food industry. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 600 Advanced Food Science: Selected Topics

Current advanced food science course topics are offered as needed (e.g., Food Proteins, Food Carbohydrate Chemistry, Cereal Technology, Fruit and Vegetable Processing, Effects of Processing Foods.) May be repeated for up to twelve credits. (Offered as needed.) 3–12 credits.

FSN 601 Food Packaging

A comprehensive overview of the technical, aesthetic, and legal aspects of packaging processed foods. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

FSN 602 Food Flavors

Students study chemical properties, isolation, separation, identification, formation and interaction mechanisms, and applications of flavor compounds. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 603 Chemistry and Technology of Fats and Oils

Students study the chemical properties, isolation, identification, and degradation mechanisms of fats and oils, and the technology of the processing and uses of fats and oils in the food industry. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 606 Dietary Supplements and Functional Foods

This course is designed to acquaint students with current trends and regulations in the supplement and functional foods industry. Students will evaluate evidence for claims made, and the efficacy and adverse effects of supplement use. The effect of processing on the stability of dietary supplement and functional foods will be discussed. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 660 Research Methods

Prerequisites, MATH 203, completion of at least 12 graduate credits. A complete orientation to research and an examination of the nature of scientific research and the steps necessary to successfully complete a research project. Students learn the principles of scientific research, how to survey and critique the literature, operationalize their hypothesis, design experiments, statistically evaluate the data, and professionally communicate results. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 690 Internship for Graduate Students

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers students an opportunity to gain work experience. A minimum of 40 hours of work for each credit. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

FSN 695 Thesis I

Prerequisite, cumulative GPA of 3.00 (B) to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the thesis option (see the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines). Students do research leading to the preparation and completion of a scientific manuscript for publication. Students enroll with a thesis advisor for FSN 695, 696, and 697 over three semesters for a total of 9 credits. Students must have a written thesis proposal approved by their FSN Graduate Committee during the first semesters of the course. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 696 Thesis II

Prerequisite, cumulative GPA of 3.00 (B) to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the thesis option (see the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines). Students do research leading to the preparation and completion of a scientific manuscript for publication. Students enroll with a thesis advisor for FSN 695, 696, and 697 over three semesters for a total of 9 credits. Students must have a written thesis proposal approved by their FSN Graduate Committee during the first semesters of the course. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 697 Thesis III

Students do research leading to the preparation and completion of a scientific manuscript for publication. Students enroll with a thesis advisor for FSN 695, 696, and 697 over three semesters for a total of 9 credits. Students must have a written thesis proposal approved by their FSN Graduate Committee during the first semester of this course. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

FSN 699 Independent Research

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected research projects involving either literature studies or laboratory research which develops new information, correlations, concepts, or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Hazards, Global and Environmental Change

HGEC 500 Hazards, Climate and Earth System Science Seminars

Prerequisites, HGEC 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. Students are introduced to various topics covering earth system sciences, hazards, global change, advanced processing techniques and other related topics by attending research oriented seminars. Seminars presented by faculty, invited speakers and students; topics vary from semester to semester. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

HGEC 510 Introduction to Natural Hazards

Students are introduced to global change, and natural hazards, as well as to different types and impacts of natural and anthropogenic hazards and resultant disasters worldwide. Connection of climate change and global change to hazards, the effects of pollution, land use change, etc. will be discussed and conclusions of how societies may face them will be drawn. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 530 Earth System Science

Prerequisite, HGEC 510, or consent of instructor. Introduction to Earth Systems –Lithosphere, Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere, and Crysophere. Processes associated with Lithosphere, Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Biosphere, and Crysophere. Biogeochemical cycle. Coupling between Lithosphere-Hydrosphere-Biosphere-Atmosphere and associated impact on Global Climate Change and Natural Hazards (all types: Land, Biosphere, Atmosphere, Crysophere, Hydrosphere), Extreme Events. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 540 Global Climate Change

Prerequisite, HGEC 510, or consent of instructor. This course will emphasize global climate change and associated impacts. Students will be introduced to climate change, including changes in the human and natural drivers of the climate, space observations of changes, modeling and the simulations as projections of future climate change and key findings and uncertainties and the relationship of natural hazards to changing climate. The connection of climate change to economy, health, energy and food production will be briefly studied in law, science, education and policy. This course will provide an opportunity to observe applications of remote sensing data and numerical models. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 550 Principles of Sustainability

This course covers environmental sustainability and develops interdisciplinary skills in connecting ideas, thinking critically and considering multiple viewpoints. This course will guide students toward understanding environmental sustainability from an interdisciplinary and a practical standpoint. Students will develop theoretical and applied skills to connect ideas, think critically, and tolerate ambiguity that results from alternative perspectives, through such contemporary concepts as “the global commons” and in efforts to influence positive action for a sustainable environment, such as The Club of Rome and “limits to growth,” the Brundtland Commission and “our common future,” and the United Nations and “climate change.” (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HGEC 610 Earth Observation and Modeling

Prerequisite, PHYS 520. Students are introduced to different Earth observing sensors, satellite platforms and Earth modeling systems. The usage of these modern systems provides critical information for climate and global changes, and applications to hazards. Specifics for instruments and satellite platforms, and the corresponding parameters obtained from remote sensing, will be discussed. Observing of the Earth systems applications for these instruments will be discussed. Infrastructure support and satellite data bases, algorithms and methods for accessing the data will also be discussed. The course will cover data systems, their evolution and understanding and what information observational and modeling data provide for Earth system, climate and hazards. Includes discussion of current efforts by agencies such as NASA and NOAA, international agencies and others to provide integrated data gathering and dissemination systems, such as the NASA DAACs, GEOSS, etc. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 620 Image Processing and Data Analysis

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course will emphasize digital processing of earth observing imagery. Students will be introduced to digital image processing techniques and their applications to earth observing remote sensing data. Topics include radiometric and geometric corrections, image enhancement, transformation, segmentation, and classification. Image acquisition sensors and platforms and commonly used data formats for remote sensing data are introduced. This course provides an opportunity to students to explore various applications of remote sensing data to earth system understanding. Strong math skills required. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 630 Meteorology, Weather and Climate

Prerequisites, PHYS 520, HGEC 540. This course will emphasize the atmospheric environment by conveying meteorological concepts in a visual and practical manner with a thorough background on basic meteorology. Topics of the course will include global warming, ozone depletion, El-Niño, and weather events such as devastating fires associated with Santa Ana winds. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 640 Environmental Impact Assessment

Prerequisites, HGEC 510, and either ENV 101, or 112, or consent of instructor. This course will provide a general overview for the need of EIA, identify, predict and evaluate the potential biological, physical, social, and health effects of projects and other development actions. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

HGEC 650 Remote Sensing of the Environment

Prerequisite, PHYS 520. Students are introduced to a thorough introduction on how to utilize remotely sensed data to its full potential so that the user would know how to extract useful information from satellite data. The main emphasis of this course is different application topics like remote sensing of vegetation, water, soils, minerals, geomorphology, and urban landscaping. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 664 Research Topics in Global Hazards

Prerequisites, admission to HGEC MS program, HGEC 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. This course will be an applied project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable paper in a major conference in Geosciences or preferably a journal paper. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 665 Directed Reading

Prerequisites, admission to HGEC MS program, HGEC 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. This course will be reading project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable technical report. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.or consent of instructor. This course will be reading project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable technical report. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HGEC 697 Thesis

Prerequisites, admission to HGEC MS program, completion of 12 graduate credits, consent of instructor. This course will deal with a research project chosen and completed under guidance of a faculty member and/or faculty committee. The project will result in an acceptable technical report (Thesis) and an oral defense. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

HGEC 699 Individual Study

Prerequisites, admission to HGEC MS program, HGEC 510, 530, 540, or consent of instructor. This course will be an applied project chosen and completed under guidance of graduate faculty member resulting in acceptable paper in a major conference in Geosciences or preferably a journal paper. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Math

MATH 580 Modern Algebra I

Prerequisite, MATH 380, or 460. A first semester graduate course in algebra. Group Theory (solvable groups, Sylow Theorems, free groups, finitely presented groups, permutation groups, orbits, stabilizers, G-sets, applications to combinatorics, representation theory, character tables), (noncommutative) rings, polynomial rings, Groebner bases, modules, Hilbert’s Nullstellensatz, fields, Galois Theory, fundamental theorem of algebra, commutative algebras, Lie groups and Lie algebras, classification of finite simple groups, and applications. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Physical Therapy

PT 510 Functional Human Anatomy I

Corequisite, PT 510L. This course on human anatomy builds upon prerequisite course work to provide a strong foundation in applied functional anatomy for the DPT student. The musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems are emphasized, but histology, radiology, and organ systems are also included. Lecture sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

PT 510L Functional Human Anatomy I Laboratory

Corequisite, PT 510. This laboratory course on human anatomy builds upon prerequisite course work to provide a strong foundation in applied functional anatomy for the DPT student. The musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems are emphasized, but histology, radiology, and organ systems are also included. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered fall semester.) 1½ credits.

PT 511 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 511L. This course provides a foundational understanding of basic biomechanical principles emphasizing the biomechanics of human tissue and the body as a whole, together with methods of human motion analysis. The student will participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions that will include scientific evidence for support of biomechanical principles. Course work is designed specifically for the DPT student and begins development of clinical judgment skills in motion analysis. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 511L Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 511. This laboratory course on applied human biomechanics builds upon requisite course work to provide a strong foundation in applied functional biomechanics for the DPT student. Instrumentation (e.g., video analysis, GAITRite, electromyography, electrogoniometry) is emphasized, but theory with a focus on Newtonian physics also are included. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 512 Kinesiological Motion Analysis

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 511, 511L, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 512L. This course further develops the students' understanding of human movement by applying biomechanical principles to individual joint mechanics both ideal and pathological, and by observational analysis of human motion including gait. The student will participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions that provide scientific evidence of joint mobility and results of motion deviations. Course work is designed specifically for the DPT student and continues development of clinical judgment skills while integrating personal and cultural values and skills. (Offered as needed.) 2½ credits.

PT 512L Kinesiology Lab

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 511, PT 511L, physical therapy major. Corequisite, PT 512. This laboratory course on applied kinesiology builds upon requisite course work to provide a strong foundation in applied functional human movement for the DPT student. Applied functional anatomy, with a focus on joint architecture, muscle function, and neuromuscular integration of movement effectiveness and efficiency is emphasized. Interactive laboratory sessions require students to think critically as they apply their knowledge. (Offered as needed.) ½ credit.

PT 513 Developmental Anatomy

A lecture course on human developmental anatomy, with an emphasis on the normal development of the systems of the body. Selected congenital anomalies and the mechanisms underlying them will also be presented. Students are required to integrate material from this course with that from their prerequisite course work and related course content across the Physical Therapy curriculum. Students must also think critically, solve problems, and assess the relevant scientific literature as they apply their knowledge. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PT 515 Applied Human Physiology

Corequisite, PT 515L. This course is an in-depth study of human physiological systems with an introduction to neurophysiology. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

PT 515L Applied Human Physiology Laboratory

Corequisite, PT 515. This laboratory course emphasizes the application of a student’s conceptual understanding of human physiology to measured, quantified responses of human systems as they respond to exercise stress. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PT 521 Applied Neurophysiology

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L. Corequisites, PT 523, 523L. This course is designed to provide the DPT student with a foundational understanding of the normal excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms of the nervous system. The student will participate in both lecture and discussion that will include the scientific evidence for neurological principles. Clinical applications, problem-solving, and critical thinking are emphasized. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PT 522 Functional Human Neuroanatomy I

Prerequisites, PT 510, 515, (with a grade of C or better). Corequisite, PT 522L. This course covers the normal structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the central nervous system. Selected case studies of pathological conditions of the nervous system are presented. Students participate in both lecture and interactive laboratory sessions (PT 522L) that require them to think critically and apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios. (Offered spring semester.) 1½ credits.

PT 522L Functional Human Neuroanatomy I Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 510, 515, (with a grade of C or better). Corequisite, PT 522. This course covers the normal structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the central nervous system. Selected case studies of pathological conditions of the nervous system are presented. Students participate in interactive laboratory sessions that require them to think critically and apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios. (Offered spring semester.) ½ credit.

PT 523 Functional Human Neuroanatomy II

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, (with a grade of C or better). Corequisite, PT 523L. This course builds upon the foundation established in PT 522. After gaining an understanding of the relationships between structure and function in the nervous system, students will focus on the inter-relationships between the various systems. Clinical reasoning and problem solving are facilitated through case studies, clinical scenarios, and discussing the current literature. (Offered summer.) 2½ credits.

PT 523L Functional Human Neuroanatomy II Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L (with a grade of C or better). Corequisite, PT 523. This course builds upon the foundation established in PT 522. After gaining an understanding of the relationships between structure and function in the nervous system, students will focus on the inter-relationships between the various systems. Clinical reasoning and problem solving are facilitated through case studies, clinical scenarios, and discussing the current literature. (Offered summer semester.) ½ credit.

PT 525 Clinical Pathology: General Medicine

This course provides the foundational understanding of general medicine diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. This lecture course covers the epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical management, pharmacological management, and implications and indications for physical therapy of these disorders to prepare the student for the clinical courses and clinical experiences to follow. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 526 Clinical Pathology: Orthopedic

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 515, 515L, 525. This course provides the foundational understanding of orthopedic diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. This lecture course covers the epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical management, pharmacological management, and implications and indications for physical therapy of these disorders to prepare the student for the clinical courses and clinical experiences to follow. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 527 Clinical Pathology: Neurology

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L. Corequisites, PT 521, 523. This course provides the foundational understanding of neurological diseases and disorders encountered by physical therapists. This lecture course covers the epidemiology, pathophysiological processes, medical management, pharmacological management, and implications and indications for physical therapy of these disorders. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PT 530 Physical Therapy Examination

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 511, 513, 515, 515L, 525. This course is the first in the series of clinical courses where students learn to deliver excellent patient care. Through lecture and laboratory experiences, students learn the theory and technique of basic patient screening and examination procedures as well as develop clinical judgment skills to complete the patient evaluation. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PT 531 General Medicine Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 515, 515L, 525. Corequisites, PT 526, 530, 531L. This lecture course covers the physical therapy management of patients with general medical conditions in a variety of practice settings with particular emphasis in the acute care setting. Basic patient handling and functional training skills are emphasized while students incorporate patient examination findings into their treatment intervention choices. Medical documentation using a S,O,A,P format is introduced. This course also includes a major unit on wound management. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PT 531L General Medicine Practice Management Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 510, 510L, 515, 515L, 525, 526, 530. Corequisite, PT 531. This laboratory course examines the physical therapy management of patients with general medical conditions in a variety of practice settings with particular emphasis in the acute-care setting. Basic patient handling and functional training skills are emphasized while students incorporate patient examination findings into their treatment intervention choices. Medical documentation using a S,O,A,P format is introduced. This lab also includes a unit on wound management. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PT 535 Musculoskeletal Practice Management I: Lower Quarter

Prerequisites, PT 510, 511, 512, 515, 525, 526, 530. This course is the first in a two part clinical series designed to prepare the DPT student to be excellent at management of musculoskeletal disorders. This series emphasizes an integrated examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention approach. This course focuses on musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity, lumbar, and sacroiliac joints and is designed to integrate basic science principles with personal and cultural values and skills to deepen and hone professional clinical judgment. (Offered summer semester.) 5 credits.

PT 539 Physical Agents

Prerequisites or corequisites, PT 510, 515. It is expected that students will have working knowledge of material from the prerequisite courses. This material will be integrated into patient case studies so students may use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to select optimal physical therapy treatment interventions. Evaluation and treatment of muscle and nerve dysfunction using therapeutic modalities. Assessment and management of pain and wounds will also be addressed. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 591 Clinical Practicum I

Introduction to clinical education, behavioral expectations for physical therapists, and clinical opportunities to practice physical therapy skills in selected areas of health care. P/NP. (Offered summer semester.) 1 credit.

PT 610 Functional Human Anatomy II

Prerequisite, PT 510, (with grade of C or better). This is the second in the series of two human anatomy courses designed specifically for the DPT student. Students will dissect the components the human body and study the interrelationships between structure and function with regard to normal and pathological conditions. The study of radiological images will also be included. Students are required to think critically, solve problems, and assess the scientific literature as they apply their knowledge to clinical scenarios and integrate the course work with that of other courses in the curriculum. (Offered summer semester.) 2 credits.

PT 629 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, approval of the course instructor. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest to the physical therapy field. It may be repeated for credit provided the course content is different. Number of credits will be determined according to the specified topic and objectives. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

PT 638 Musculoskeletal Practice Management II: Upper Quarter

Prerequisites, PT 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 535. This course is the second in a two part clinical series designed to prepare the DPT student to be excellent with management of musculoskeletal disorders. This series emphasizes an integrated examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention approach and this course focuses on musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity, cervical spine, head and thorax. Course work is designed to integrate basic science principles with personal and cultural values and skills to deepen and hone professional clinical judgment. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

PT 640 Neurological Practice Management

In this lecture and laboratory course, concepts in motor control and motor learning are integrated into the examination, prognosis, diagnosis, intervention, and plan of care of the patient with neurologic dysfunction. Students also develop skills in vestibular rehabilitation. Functional movement analysis and documentation skills are incorporated throughout the course. (Offered fall semester.) 5 credits.

PT 641 Rehabilitation Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 510, 515, 515L, 521, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 527, 530. This course prepares physical therapist students to deliver excellent patient care in the rehabilitation environment. Included in this course are the respective roles of members of the rehabilitation team, patient evaluation, goal setting, and treatment planning including orthotic and prosthetic prescription and management, wheelchair and other adaptive equipment evaluation and prescription, pathological gait analysis, evaluation of home accessibility and discharge planning. Students will explore the challenges encountered by physical therapists in the rehabilitation environment through directed readings, classroom discussions, and as well as laboratory activities. (Offered summer.) 4 credits.

PT 643 Motor Control and Motor Learning

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L. Corequisite, PT 643L. This course introduces the science of motor control/motor learning including the neuromotor processes that underlie normal and abnormal movement. Theories of motor learning and mechanisms for acquisition of skill are discussed. Neuromotor and neuropsychological research are investigated and clinical implications are discussed. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PT 643L Motor Control and Motor Learning Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L. Corequisite, PT 643. This laboratory introduces the science of motor control/motor learning including the neuromotor processes that underlie normal and abnormal movement. Applications of theories of motor control/learning and mechanisms for acquisition of skill are examined and applied to physical therapy practice. Neuromotor and neuropsychological research are investigated and clinical implications are discussed. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PT 646 Cardiopulmonary Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 515, 525. This course prepares PT students to deliver excellent patient care to patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. Students gain an overview of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology and the comprehensive physical therapy management of patients with cardiopulmonary diseases through lecture and lab activities. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PT 647 Pediatric Practice Management

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L. Corequisite, PT 647L. This lecture course prepares physical therapy students to meet entry-level physical therapy to pediatric clients in all practice settings. Patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, and intervention will be discussed in relation to commonly encountered pediatric diagnoses. Environmental, cultural, legislative, and legal issues that affect the delivery of care are explored. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PT 647L Pediatric Practice Management Laboratory

Prerequisites, PT 522, 522L, 523, 523L. Corequisite, PT 647. This laboratory course prepares physical therapy students to meet entry-level physical therapy to pediatric clients in all practice settings. Patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, and intervention will be practiced in relation to commonly encountered pediatric diagnoses. Environmental, cultural, legislative, and legal issues that affect the delivery of care are explored. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

PT 650 Scientific Inquiry I

Prerequisite, physical therapy major. This course is the first step in making students critical consumers of the scientific literature related to the practice of healthcare, specifically physical therapy. Basic research approaches with application to physical therapy are reviewed in a lecture and seminar format. These research approaches include descriptive research, grounded theory research to experimental designs and others with an emphasis on clinical applications. The concepts associated with Evidence Based Medicine will be introduced. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PT 651 Scientific Inquiry II

Prerequisite, PT 650. This course is the second in the series with introduction of specific descriptive and inferential statistics introduced through lecture and review of current literature. Students continue to develop critical reading and writing skills with production of potential research proposals based on designs discussed in class. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 2–3 credits.

PT 660 Directed Research I

Prerequisite, PT 650, consent of instructor. This course is the first in a series of four courses designed to guide students through an independent faculty-sponsored research project. In this course, students select a topic and complete a review of the literature as they develop a research hypothesis. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

PT 661 Directed Research II

Prerequisites, PT 650, 660, consent of instructor. This course is the second in a four-semester series of courses designed to guide students through an independent faculty-sponsored research project. In this course, students continue to work on their research project as they integrate their knowledge of experimental design and statistics and begin to implement the methods. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PT 665 Diagnostic Imaging

Prerequisite, PT 510 (with a grade of C or better). This course will familiarize the DPT student with clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging including plain film x-ray, magnetic resonance, and computerized tomography films. Selection protocols will be discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course will focus on the clinical interpretation and integration of imaging data into rehabilitation regimen design, outcome assessment, and communication with other medical professionals. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PT 670 Cultural Diversity and Psychology of Health Care

This course is a seminar, lecture, and discussion course involving the study of oppression theory followed by issues of racism, sexism, and homophobia and their effects on healthcare outcomes. The social, legal, and professional impact will be analyzed from the historical perspective with attention to the current and future implications for the practice of physical therapy. Students will also gain an in depth understanding of human behavior as it relates to coping and adjustment behaviors in acute and chronic illness. Culturally appropriate patient education through programs for patients, family members, caregivers, and professional colleagues will be addressed as well as reasonable alternative approaches in health care. (Offered fall semester.) 3½ credits.

PT 671 Physical Therapy Ethics

Prerequisite, enrolled in physical therapy program. This course is an overview of basic ethical principles relevant to the patient-provider role. Dilemmas frequently encountered in physical therapy in both clinical and research settings are integrated into the course content. The course is conducted in a lecture/seminar format. (Offered summer semester.) 3 credits.

PT 690 Clinical Affiliation

Prerequisite, enrolled in physical therapy curriculum, consent of instructor. This course gives students additional work experiences and practice related to the major of physical therapy. The course may not be used to substitute for required clinical practica or internship courses. Work hours for credit determined by instructor. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

PT 691 Clinical Practicum II

Prerequisite, PT 591. Continuation of clinical education, behavioral expectations for physical therapists, and clinical opportunities to practice physical therapy skills in selected areas of health care. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PT 692 Clinical Experience I

Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 12-week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 6 credits.

PT 693A Clinical Experience IA

Corequisite, PT 693B. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 6-8-week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice in a different facility from the experience in PT 693B. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 693B Clinical Experience IB

Corequisite, PT 693A. Students are in a supervised clinical education experience in the community. This 6-8 week experience allows students to develop skills in patient care and management that are necessary for entry-level clinical competence for physical therapy practice in a different facility from the experience in PT 693A. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 701 Professional Self-Assessment

Required of all students. Prerequisite, admission to the transitional DPT program. This course provides for the use of a portfolio process for self assessment of professional knowledge and skills, for decision making regarding course work to be completed in a post-professional curriculum, and for communication of assessment results with faculty. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 702 Principles of Evidence Based Practice

Prerequisite, admission to the transitional DPT program. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and seminar course with most of the information covered online. Students will focus on developing the skills needed for search, access, retrieve, synthesize, and critique the published literature and other selected media and integrating scientific literature into patient care within physical therapy practice. Current journal articles, texts, and online resources will be used in the course to develop clinical decision making skills based on available evidence. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 710 Diagnostic Imaging

Prerequisite, successful completion (with a grade of C or better) of PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course will familiarize the DPT student with clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging including plain film x-ray, magnetic resonance, and computerized tomography films. Selection protocols will be discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course will focus on the clinical interpretation and integration of imaging data into rehabilitation regimen design, outcome assessment, and communication with other medical professionals. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 711 Applied Pharmacology

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course provides the foundational understanding of pharmacology for physical therapists to provide optimal patient management to patients who are taking prescription and non-prescription medications. The general principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented as well as the mechanism of action of common groups of medications that influence the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary, and integumentary systems. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 712 Pharmacology

Prerequisite, PT 515 (with a grade of C or better). This course will familiarize the physical therapy student with basic and applied clinical pharmacology. Class content includes the effects of pharmacotherapy on the health and well being of patients and clinical incorporation of pharmacological data into treatment selection and delivery. Students will gain familiarity with prescription and over-the-counter medication brand and generic names, indications, contraindications, dosage schedules, and potential effects and side effects of significance to physical therapy treatment. (Offered spring semester.) 2½ credits.

PT 720 Screening Examinations

Prerequisite, enrollment in the DPT program. This course is designed to prepare the transitional DPT student to complete screening examinations for clients/patients through the lifespan. The screening goal is to determine the need for prevention services, further examination by a physical therapist, or referral to another practitioner. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 721 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Orthopedics

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with musculoskeletal complaints. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions, and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 722 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Neurological

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with neurological insults. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions, and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 723 Advanced Practice Management and Differential Diagnosis: Cardiopulmonary

Prerequisites, PT 711, 720, or consent of instructor. This course is an online/onsite hybrid lecture and laboratory course focusing on developing effective patient/client management skills for patients with cardiopulmonary findings. The students evaluate evidence and new concepts through readings, online lectures, and discussions, including the clinical reasoning for applying concepts to the plan of care, interventions, and outcomes. Laboratory skills for patient tests, measures, and intervention are covered in the onsite component. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 725 Pathological Basis of Disease in Physical Therapy Practice

Prerequisite, enrolled in the transitional DPT program. This course will examine human pathology. Specific areas for this course include an introduction to the general response to injury, wound healing and healing complications, pain mechanisms, immunity, and autoimmune disorders. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 730 Physical Therapy Ethics for Practitioners

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course is an overview of basic ethical principles including, but not limited to, autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, veracity, and justice as well as an examination of the feminists' approach to medical ethics. In addition, models of health care delivery are examined and evaluated for compliance with basic principles of fair resource allocation. Dilemmas frequently encountered in physical therapy in both clinical and research settings are integrated into the course content. The course is conducted in a lecture/seminar format and is intended for students enrolled in the transitional DPT curriculum. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 731 Professional Leadership and Development

Prerequisite, PT 701, or consent of instructor. This course addresses current and future professional, legal, and ethical issues related to physical therapy practice, education, and research and prepares students for leadership roles as change agents in the profession. Students examine evolving roles for the profession as affected by such factors as changing societal demands, trends in health care, government regulations, and the expanding body of knowledge. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PT 738 Advanced Patient/Client Management and Therapeutic Exercise

Prerequisites, good academic standing in the final year of the professional DPT curriculum. In this culminating course in the professional curriculum, the anatomical/physiological bases for patient/client practice management are combined with the available evidence for managing patients with multiple diagnoses and complex pathologies/impairments. Students consider cultural, psychological, and administrative aspects of patient care including supervision of students and physical therapist assistants. (Offered spring semester.) 2½ credits.

PT 740 Advanced Clinical Internship

Prerequisite, PT 722, or consent of instructor. Student to develop and practice clinical decision making by utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) in the workplace, promoting EBP to the community, and demonstrating application of program content to the clinical setting. Student and faculty to identify specific areas of program content which are to be emphasized in clinical setting. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 2–6 credits.

PT 742 Geriatric Practice Management

This lecture and laboratory course develops students' skills in the management of patients with general medical conditions, with an emphasis on the acute care setting. Basic patient handling, functional training and gait training skills are emphasized while students incorporate examination findings in their treatment choices. This course also includes a unit on wound management. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 748 Wellness and Complementary Medicine

This course prepares physical therapy students to incorporate their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and alternative approaches to health care into the delivery of excellent patient care. Students will integrate information related to diet, nutrition, and wellness behavior from courses in applied human physiology and cardiopulmonary practice management into comprehensive physical therapy treatment plans for patients in all likely settings. In addition, students will become familiar with commonly encountered treatment approaches that fall under the umbrella of "alternative" or "complementary" medicine. The emphasis of this portion of the course is the scientific evidence related to these approaches. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PT 748A Wellness and Complementary Medicine

This course prepares physical therapy students to incorporate their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and alternative approaches to health care into the delivery of excellent patient care. Students will integrate information related to diet, nutrition, and wellness behavior from courses in applied human physiology and cardiopulmonary practice management into comprehensive physical therapy treatment plans for patients in all likely settings. In addition, students will become familiar with commonly encountered treatment approaches that fall under the umbrella of "alternative" or "complementary" medicine. The emphasis of this portion of the course is the scientific evidence related to these approaches. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PT 752 Scientific Inquiry III

Prerequisites, PT 650, 651. The third course in the series which will apply the topics of evidence based practice, research design, statistics, critical reading, and scientific writing to a case report and an approved group or individual project for poster presentation. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PT 762 Directed Research III

Prerequisites, PT 650, 660, 661, consent of instructor. This course is the third in a four-semester series of courses designed to guide students through an independent faculty-sponsored research project. In this course, students continue to work on their research project as they update their review of the literature and methods and collect data. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 763 Directed Research IV

Continuation of PT 660, 661, 762, Directed Research I, II, III; Data analysis is completed and the manuscript reaches a final acceptable form. A poster presentation of the research project may be required. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PT 771 Responsible Leadership and Administration

Prerequisite, enrolled in the DPT curriculum. This course is a study of the theoretical, historical, and philosophical underpinnings of various aspects of management related to the administration of physical therapy services. During the course the student will gain an understanding of basic management science including organizational theory and behavior, compliance ethics, and normative ethics in health care administration. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PT 782 Applied Administration

Prerequisite, enrolled in PT program. Study of the theoretical, historical, and institutional components of various aspects of management of personnel, business management, and legal considerations in management which are related to the administration of physical therapy services. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PT 782T Business Administration in Physical Therapy

Study of the components of various aspects of management of personnel, business management and legal considerations in management which are related to the administration of physical therapy services. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PT 790 Special Topics in Physical Therapy

Advanced supervised group study or research on a special topic. Examples of topics include innovative practice areas (such as sports, women's health, oncology, alternative practice), emerging delivery areas (such as direct access, under served populations, fee for service), education, administrative, or research. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PT 793 Clinical Experience II

Prerequisites, PT 693A, 693B, or 692, enrolled in physical therapy curriculum. Continuation of PT 692, or 693A, and 693B series. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 6 credits.

PT 794A Clinical Experience IIA

Prerequisites, PT 693A, 693B, or 692. Corequisite, PT 794B. Continuation of PT 692, or 693A, and 693B series. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PT 794B Clinical Experience IIB

Prerequisites, PT 693A, 693B, or 692. Corequisite, PT 794A. Continuation of PT 692, or 693A, and 693B series. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PT 795 Clinical Experience III

Prerequisites, PT 794A, 794B, or 793, enrolled in physical therapy curriculum. Continuation of PT 793, or 794A, and 794B series. P/NP. (Offered summer semester.) 6 credits.

PT 796A Clinical Experience IIIA

Prerequisites, PT 794A, 794B, or 793. Corequisite, PT 796B, or 796C. Continuation of PT 793, or 794A, and 794B series. P/NP. (Offered summer semester.) 3 credits.

PT 796B Clinical Experience IIIB

Prerequisites, PT 794A, 794B, or 793. Corequisite, PT 796A. Continuation of PT 793, or 794A, and 794B series. P/NP. (Offered summer semester.) 3 credits.

PT 796C Clinical Experience IIIC

Prerequisites, PT 793, or 794A, and 794B. Corequisite, PT 796A. A specialized internship on a contractual basis designed to allow the student to pursue an area of physical therapy practice in greater depth. P/NP. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PT 796I International Clinical Experience

Prerequisites, PT 793, or both 794A, and 794B. Corequisite, PT 796A. A specialized international internship on a contractual basis designed to allow students to pursue an area of physical therapy practice in a foreign country. P/NP. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PT 799 Research or Individual Study in Physical Therapy

Prerequisite, enrolled in the professional or post-professional DPT curriculum, consent of advisor. Advanced supervised individual study or research on a special topic, problem or current professional issue. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Physics

PHYS 520 Physical Principles of Remote Sensing

Prerequisites, PHYS 101, 102, or consent of instructor. Students get a thorough introduction to gathering the basic concepts and procedures of fundamentals of physical principles of remote sensing. The main emphasis is on the physical and mathematical principles underlying the techniques, such as the atmospheric radiative transfer, satellite orbit, and geo-location simulation, and science algorithm designing, calibration, and atmosphere corrections. Other computational methods will be emphasized. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions - Psychology

Prerequisite Courses

PSY 203 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, MATH 104, proficiency in pre-calculus mathematics as evidenced by the appropriate placement exam score available through the Department of Mathematics. The course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, the rationale of hypothesis testing, a survey of the common parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, and the calculation and interpretation of statistical indices and applications. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 204 Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, or equivalents with consent of instructor. Corequisite, PSY 204L. An introduction to the principles and procedures involved in behavioral sciences research emphasizing the scientific method and its application to psychological inquiry. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

PSY 310 Psychology of Learning

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An examination of the theoretical and methodological foundations of human learning. Emphasis is placed on an evaluation of the major learning paradigms and on the application of learning principles. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 317 Cognitive Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Examines the neural basis for cognition beginning with attention and spans the breadth of cognitive processes to include memory, learning, language, reasoning, and problem solving. Students learn how our minds absorb, store, and manipulate information from the world to solve problems, make decisions, comprehend language, produce art, and laugh at jokes. Students are encouraged to think critically and develop questions about their own cognitive processes. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 322 Theories of Personality

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An evaluative review of the major theories of personality emphasizing structural, dynamical, developmental, and pathological aspects. Specific personality theories to be covered include psychodynamic, biological, behavioral, cognitive, social learning, humanistic–existential, traits, and person–situation. Knowledge of these classic theories is balanced with current research applications. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 323 Child Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Corequisite, PSY 323L. This course is for psychology majors and covers the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains of development from conception through adolescence. The course consists of a lecture and a laboratory component. Lectures introduce major theories and research strategies in child development and integrates applied aspects such as parenting and teaching children. The laboratory includes professionally supervised fieldwork with children in an approved setting. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

PSY 323L Lab for Child Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. Corequisite, PSY 323. The laboratory component of PSY 323. (Offered fall semester.) 0 credits.

PSY 327 Life Span Development

Prerequisite, PSY 101. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major theories, concepts, and research methods in life–span developmental psychology. Students will learn to understand cognitive, emotional, and social development and changes across the entire life span from infancy to late adulthood. This course examines the biological and environmental foundations of development including cross–cultural issues and highlights empirical research to integrate theoretical and applied perspectives. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 328 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An overview of the field of abnormal psychology, which is the application of methods, principles, and findings from psychological research to understand, classify, and treat “abnormal” behavior and psychologically–based human suffering. Topics of lectures, discussions, and video presentations provide an integrative overview of current approaches to classification, assessment, and treatment of psychological disorders and mental illness. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 330 Child Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisites, PSY 101, and either 323, 326, or 327, or concurrent enrollment. This course reviews the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological and development disorders in children and adolescents. This course is likely to benefit all students who are interested in interacting with children and adolescents, as well as students considering careers involving children and youth with emotional and behavioral problems. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 333 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An investigation of the relationship between brain and behavior. Students will study the structure and function of the nervous system, including the biological bases of psychopathology and normal function. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 336 Social Psychology

Prerequisite, PSY 101. An introduction to the scientific study of how groups and individuals interact. Cognition, feelings, impressions, and attitudes influence and are influenced by the presence of others according to the precepts of Social Psychology. Topics include manipulation and influence tactics, persuasion, attraction, aggression, altruism, self–concept, stereotypes, and cognition and behavioral congruence. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 432 Introduction to Psychological Assessment

Prerequisites, PSY 101, 203, or equivalent, concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor. An introduction to test uses, benefits, and cautions associated with testing from a psychological perspective. Topics include test construction, validity, reliability, intelligence, learning disabilities, test anxiety, and the interpretation and use of personality measures. Multiple psychological tests will be provided to students for interpretation and analysis. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

Graduate standing is required for all 500 and 600 level courses

PSY 515 Assessment of Individuals and Families

Prerequisite, PSY 570, or concurrent enrollment. A study of the clinical application of well researched and scientifically-based psychological assessment instruments and processes designed specifically for marriage and family therapy practice. Content includes clinical interviewing, administration, and interpretation of objective measures of family/marital dynamics, cognitive functioning, personality, psychopathology, and the writing of assessment-based treatment plans. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 516 Assessment of Individuals and Families

(For degree in 2012-13 catalog.) Prerequisite, PSY 570, or concurrent enrollment. A study of the clinical application of well researched and scientifically-based psychological assessment instruments and processes designed specifically for marriage and family therapy practice. Content includes clinical interviewing, administration and interpretation of objective measures of family/marital dynamics, cognitive functioning, personality, psychopathology and the writing of intake summaries and assessment-based treatment plans. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PSY 532 Research and Bibliographic Methods

This course examines essential issues in bibliographic search, research design and methodology relevant to marriage and family therapy research. Students are exposed to quantitative and qualitative approaches with a focus on developing critical evaluative skills when examining theoretical, assessment-focused, and treatment outcome research. Clinical practice implications of contemporary studies are examined through student presentations, discussion groups, and papers. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 533 Psychopharmacology for Marriage and Family Therapists

This course presents a brief overview of diagnostic interviewing and applying DSM-IV diagnostic criteria to mental disorders in order to select psychopharmacological interventions that will benefit the MFT’s client. Topics discussed will include differential diagnosis of medical, substance induced, and primary psychiatric disorders, cultural views of mental disorders, coordinating efforts between psychotherapist and physician prescriber, and finding prescribers with expertise in psychiatric medications. Side effects, benign and dangerous, will be discussed as well as appropriate dose, duration, and expected time of drug response. The role of psychosocial recovery models integrating medication, psychotherapy, and socialization/education approaches will be discussed. The course will include faculty lectures on core topics such as CNS function (e.g. neurotransmitters), schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, panic, OCD, substance use disorders and their medication treatment. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PSY 535 Research Design and Analysis

Prerequisite, PSY 532, or equivalent. A comprehensive and systematic examination of advanced research methods and statistical procedures applied to the empirical evaluation of human behavior. The course prepares students for the design and analysis of a master's thesis relevant to marriage and family therapy. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 541 Systems of Psychotherapy for Marriage and Family Therapists

This course provides a survey of the major theoretical approaches used in individual, couple, and family therapy from a systemic perspective with a focus toward integration of these approaches in the conduct of therapy as a marriage and family therapist. Approaches covered include psychoanalysis, psychodynamic, humanistic, existential, interpersonal, gestalt, behavioral and cognitive approaches. Three approaches, cognitive-behavioral, humanistic-existential and psychodynamic are covered in greater detail to provide a foundation for case conceptualization and treatment planning for preparation of the licensure exam for Marriage and Family Therapists in the State of California. Course procedures aim to balance didactic and experiential modes of learning. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 556 Systems Theory and Family Therapy

A fundamental introduction to the study of systems theory and family therapy. Theories and techniques of family therapy are reviewed and practical applications are discussed. The history of systems theory is presented and a variety of family therapy approaches are discussed. The history of systems theory is presented through readings, lectures and videotapes. Particular attention is given to family-of-origin influences, gender and ethnicity in understanding family dynamics. Case conceptualization and treatment planning from systems and post-modern perspectives are emphasized for preparation of the licensure exam for Marriage and Family Therapists in the State of California. Instructor modeling and student role-play enhance student learning. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 561 Couple Therapy

Couple difficulties are studied with particular emphasis placed on the unique assessment strategies necessary for conjoint evaluation and treatment. The course emphasizes emotionally focused couple therapy and other empirically supported treatment approaches. Gender, culture, sexual orientation, and social class are considered when discussing domestic violence, conceptualizing cases, creating treatment plans, and understanding the standards of practice for couple therapy. Instructor modeling and student role play demonstrations are used to facilitate learning. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 565 Diagnosis and Treatment of Children and Adolescents

An examination of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, with consideration of the major types of disturbances, etiologies, assessment techniques, cultural and socioeconomic implications, and treatment approaches with children and adolescents. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding diagnosis, case conceptualization, and treatment planning within a developmental and recovery-oriented care model. This course addresses issues in child abuse reporting and treatment for marriage and family therapists. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 570 Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis

Prerequisite, abnormal psychology course, or equivalent. An examination of psychopathology and diagnosis based on the DSM IV-TR for purposes of record keeping as well as treatment planning and treatment selection for each major disorder within marriage and family therapist’s scope of practice. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 572 The Counseling Process

Prerequisites, PSY 541, 570, or concurrent enrollment, spring admits only. A professionally supervised experience designed to introduce students to the practice of marriage and family therapy in an on-site training clinic. Utilizing a variety of techniques, students learn a practical framework for gathering clinical information, interviewing clients in the initial sessions of treatment, and managing clinical crises. Supervised role plays and video-taped practice sessions are used to help students learn sound therapy skills using a caring, humanistic approach. (Offered spring semester and summer.) 3 credits.

PSY 573 Crisis Management and Clinical Process

(For degree in 2012-13 catalog.) Prerequisites, PSY 541, 570. A professionally supervised experience designed to introduce students to the practice of marriage and family therapy in an on-site training clinic. Utilizing the principles of mental health recovery-oriented care, students learn a practical framework for gathering clinical information while understanding social and psychological implications of cultural and socioeconomic factors. Emphasis is on crisis management, including harm to self and others, trauma and issues of grief and loss. Materials will include actual paperwork from the Frances Smith Center for Individual and Family Therapy. Supervised role plays and video-taped practice sessions are used to help students learn sound therapy skills using a caring, humanistic approach. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 578 Ethical and Professional Issues for Marriage and Family Therapists

This course examines ethical, legal, and professional issues relevant to the practice of marriage and family therapy. Ethical and legal responsibilities are discussed within the context of relevant state laws/regulations, professional ethical codes and the importance of interdisciplinary cooperation across clinical settings. Instructor modeling and student role play exercises are used to develop ethical decision-making skills that address issues commonly seen in individual, couples, and family therapy. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 580 Principles and Techniques of Individual Therapy

Prerequisites, PSY 541, 570. A comprehensive overview of integrative psychotherapy with a focus on cognitive-behavioral and acceptance-based interventions from a systems perspective for use in the individual treatment setting. Topics of lectures and discussions include a functional approach to assessment; case conceptualization, goal setting, and development of treatment plans; and implementation of effective empirically supported behavioral interventions and assessment of their efficacy. Video demonstrations and role plays are employed to facilitate student learning. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 581 Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Disorders

Students examine normal sexual functioning and common types of sexual dysfunction from a relational and systemic perspective. Students learn counseling techniques effective in the development of satisfactory sexual functioning with particular emphasis given to gender differences in human sexuality. Considerations of research, theory, and the application of knowledge in the prevention and remediation of disorders related to human sexuality will be emphasized. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 582 Assessment and Treatment Sexual Disorders

(For degree in 2012-13 catalog.) Students examine normal sexual functioning and common types of sexual dysfunction from a relational and systemic perspective. Students learn counseling techniques effective in the development of satisfactory sexual functioning with particular emphasis given to gender, culture and social differences in human sexuality. The interaction between physiological, psychological and social-cultural variables associated with sexual behavior and gender identity are emphasized in the course. Considerations of research, theory, and the application of knowledge in the prevention and remediation of disorders related to human sexuality will be emphasized. (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PSY 583 Advanced Theoretical Applications

(For degree in 2012-13 catalog.) Prerequisites, PSY 541, 570. A comprehensive overview of integrative psychotherapy applied to work within recovery-oriented systems of care. The course applies a biopsychosocial systems framework to understand the major evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy including: humanist-existential; psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and post-modern. Topics of lectures and discussions include strength-based and systemically oriented assessment; diversity informed case conceptualization, goal setting, treatment planning; and the implementation of a variety of empirically supported interventions applied to unique individuals from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. Video demonstrations and role play enhance student procedural learning, while case conceptualization and treatment planning are rehearsed using video and written vignettes from actual community mental health consumers. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 586 Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse

An overview of current theoretical and clinical approaches to the diagnosis, and treatment of alcoholism and other chemical dependencies. Students review current research and program design from a family systems perspective with the goal of increasing professional awareness and skills in treating the chemically dependent family or individual. The models of substance abuse treatment, including twelve step programs, and other family systems approaches will be emphasized. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 588 Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse

(For degree in 2012-13 catalog.) An overview of current theoretical and clinical approaches to the diagnosis, and treatment of alcoholism, chemical dependency and co-occurring disorders. Using principles of recovery-oriented care, students review current research and program design from a family systems perspective with the goal of increasing professional awareness and skills in treating the chemically dependent family or individual. The models of substance abuse treatment, including twelve step programs, and other family systems approaches will be emphasized. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PSY 595 Topic Courses in Marriage and Family Therapy

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 599 Independent Study

Supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area of psychology. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PSY 605 Group Therapy

This course examines the dynamics of group psychotherapy and introduces students to the conceptual and practical application of techniques and interventions to the practice of group work in various therapeutic settings. Theories used in group practice along with components, process and stage development will be emphasized in the course. An understanding of cultural, social, psychological and socio-economics pertaining to group work will also be explored. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 610 Family Life Cycle and Aging

Prerequisite, PSY 556. This course provides an overview of human development across the life span from a family systems perspective. Theories related to the entire life span from conception through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging are reviewed with an emphasis on the impact of poverty, social class, and social insecurity on development. Focus is given to the impact of normative and non-normative life transitions in a family context . Emphasis is placed on a pluralistic understanding of families as described by cultural, family, and individual diversity. In-depth interviewing of one developmental stage is required. Perspectives on aging and end of life issues are discussed. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 618 Multicultural Issues in Therapy

A study of multicultural counseling emphasizing understanding and respect for the diversity of human beings, particularly with regard to matters of race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, religion, sexual orientation and disability. The course analyzes the cultural context of family, behavior, psychopathology, assessment and counseling. Utilization of mental-health services by California specific ethnic/culture-specific groups are addressed. Critical analysis is given to ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, ableism and heterosexism in society and traditional culture-bound assessment and treatment approaches. The course objective is to produce culturally competent marriage and family therapists. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PSY 620 Public Mental Health

An overview of the recovery model and recovery oriented mental health care practices in California public mental health. Students will learn the basic theoretical principles and practices of the recovery model. Course content includes case management, systems of care, public/private support and advocacy for working with the severely mentally ill, case management skills and community resources, disaster and trauma response counseling, and Motivational Interview techniques and collaborative treatment practices. Students will also have the opportunity to interface with consumers and families of consumers of mental health services during this course. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PSY 675 Career Counseling

This course explores the role of career development issues as it affects the individual, couple and family. Course content includes exploration of models of career development, work-life issues, stages of life, multicultural issues and the interplay of these for the individual and their system. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PSY 688 Practicum I

Prerequisites, candidacy standing in the MFT degree program, PSY 515, 541, 556, 561, 570, 578, 580, written consent of graduate program coordinator. Provides clinical experience in groups and/or individually for the master's degree candidate. It is intended as the final preparation for entry into a career in the mental health field at the master's level. P/NP. The course must be taken three semesters. Fee: $80. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PSY 689 Practicum II

Prerequisites, candidacy standing in the MFT degree program, PSY 515, 541, 556, 561, 570, 578, 580, 688, and written consent of graduate program manager. Provides clinical experience in groups and/or individually of the masters degree candidate with an MFT emphasis. It is intended as the final preparation for entry into a career in the mental health field at the masters level. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PSY 694 Practicum I

(For students in the 2012-2013 catalog.) Prerequisites, candidacy standing in the MFT degree program, PSY 516, 541, 556, 561, 565, 570, 573, 578, 583, written consent of graduate program manager. Provides supervised clinical experience in groups and individually for MFT candidates. It is intended as the final preparation for entry into a career in the mental health field at the master's level. The course must be taken for three semesters. Graded. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $80. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

PSY 697/698 Master’s Thesis Research I, II

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 (B) to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the thesis/project option. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines.) Individually supervised master’s thesis research. (Offered as needed.) 3, 3 credits.

PSY 699 Independent Study

Advanced supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.