The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics

Reginald H. Gilyard, MBA, Dean, Robert and Caroline Waltos, Jr. Chair in Business and Economics

Thomas Turk, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Kenneth Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs

Darryl Stevens, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs

Professors: Adibi, Booth, Camera, Campbell, J. Doti, L. Doti, Haight, Iannaccone, Kathuria, Kovenock, Kraft, Pfeiffer, Porter, Rassenti, Sfeir, Smith, Tuggle, Wihlborg, Wilcox, Wilson;

Associate Professors: Broughton, Browne, Burnham, Dehning, Giannantonio, Hanson, Karniouchina, Murphy, Murray, Nyer, Rubin, Shukla, Turk, Virchick, Ybarra;

Assistant Professors: Adler, Ataman, Corgnet, Coskuner–Balli, DeSantis, Kamal, Higgins, Lawandy, Munson, Myhr, Nistor, Oliphant, Shields, Sinha, Stephens, Sudek, Winn, Yalcin, Yeo.

Full–time Master of Business Administration

Professional Master of Business Administration

Integrated Five Year Undergraduate/Master of Business Administration Program

Master of Business Administration in Prague

Joint Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration

Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Fine Arts in Film and Television Producing

Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Food Science

Executive Master of Business Administration
Master of Science in Accounting

Master of Science in Economic Systems Design
Integrated Five Year Undergraduate/Master of Science in Economic Systems Design

The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics’ programs prepare students to assume leadership roles in business organizations in a dynamic market economy. Successful graduates, grounded in economic reasoning with an understanding of the role of markets, will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and evaluate opportunities throughout the world and mobilize the resources to exploit them.

Research Centers

A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research

The A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research (ACER) was established in 1979. The mission of the center is to provide data, facilities and support in order to encourage the faculty and students at Chapman University to engage in economic and business research of high quality and to disseminate the results of this research to the Southern California communities.

C. Larry Hoag Center for Real Estate and Finance

Established in 2005, the C. Larry Hoag Center for Real Estate and Finance is the Argyros School's newest center. In addition to coordinating the Argyros School's academic programs in real estate, the center provides real estate expertise to the Orange County community, sponsors symposia and panel discussions and offers information and assistance to students interested in pursuing a career in the real estate industry.

Ralph W. Leatherby Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics

Established in 1996 for students, alumni and Orange County businesses, the Ralph W. Leatherby Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics provides resources for individuals interested in succeeding with entrepreneurial pursuits. Nationally ranked in entrepreneurship by Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review, the center provides advice on start–up strategies, business and marketing plans, strategies for growing firms as well as guidance in securing angel and venture capital funding. Students are provided opportunities for entrepreneurial internships, business plan contests, consulting team projects and mentorship opportunities.

Walter Schmid Center for International Business

The Walter Schmid Center for International Business was established in 1992. The mission of the center is to provide leadership in internationalizing business education in the Argyros School of Business and Economics, to create and disseminate knowledge through research on the global economy and to provide a resource for Orange County business people to assess and act upon opportunities in the global marketplace.

Master of Business Administration

The Argyros School of Business and Economics offers MBA programs for people interested in expanding their careers and developing their expertise. Students completing the MBA program will develop an understanding of all functional areas of business, an ability to communicate persuasively, a capacity for effective economic analysis and a global perspective.

Admission to the program

Admission to the Chapman MBA program is competitive. Applicants are evaluated on academic performance, leadership potential, work experience and communication skills. Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Submit the application for admission.
  2. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  3. Achieve an undergraduate grade point average of 2.500 or higher.
  4. Achieve an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).
  5. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or professional abilities.
  6. Foreign applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States may be required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

The Argyros School prefers students with at least two years of business–related work experience. Students who do not meet this standard are strongly encouraged to gain relevant experience through an internship position while enrolled in the MBA program.

Students with a 3.000 or higher undergraduate grade point average may receive a Chapman tuition grant based on overall strength of the application including GMAT performance. Scholarships for eligible students are awarded on the basis of the date of application to the Argyros School of Business and Economics.

Transfer of credit

Students who have taken graduate business courses in other AACSB–accredited universities may transfer up to six elective credits with approval of the Argyros School of Business and Economics. Students who have taken graduate course work equivalent to a core course may waive the core course with special approval of the Argyros School of Business and Economics Graduate Committee and substitute another course in that subject area.

Argyros School graduate honors

Graduate honors will be awarded to MBA and Executive MBA graduates who achieve a final grade point average that is among the top five percent of all MBA graduates.

FullTime Master of Business Administration

Applications for admission to the full–time MBA program are accepted for enrollment in the fall semester. Required classes must be taken in the sequence prescribed by the program. Electives may be offered in afternoon or evening sessions.

Professional Master of Business Administration

Applications for admission to the Professional MBA program are accepted for enrollment in the fall and spring semesters. During the fall and spring semesters, courses in the program are offered both in the daytime and evening and occasional Saturdays. Additionally, two summer sessions and a winter interterm offer maximum flexibility for students to complete their course of study.

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree

The MBA curriculum is divided into three groups of courses: core courses covering all functional areas of business, an integrative capstone course and electives through which students customize their program. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

The following courses make up the MBA curriculum:

core courses (31 credits)

BUS 600

Strategies for Competitive Advantage

1

BUS 601

Economic Analysis for Business

3

BUS 602

Accounting and Financial Analysis

3

BUS 603

Statistics for Business Decisions

3

BUS 604

Organization and Management

3

BUS 605

Marketing Management

3

BUS 606

Operations and Technology Management

3

BUS 607

Financial Management

3

BUS 609

Business Analytics

3

BUS 610

Understanding the Global Business Environment

4

BUS 613

Accounting for Management and Control

2

capstone course (4 credits)

BUS 612*

Strategic Management

4

*Registration for BUS 612 requires a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.000. The course must be passed with a grade of "B–" or higher.

electives (15 credits)

All elective credits must be earned in 500 or 600–level ACTG or ECON courses or 600–level BUS courses or approved as part of a joint degree program.

15

total credits

 

50

emphases

Students may pursue one emphasis in the Master of Business Administration. Each emphasis is satisfied by taking 12 credits from among the electives listed under the emphases below. The emphasis area is noted on the transcript.

emphasis in entrepreneurship (12 credits)

four of the following

BUS 630

New Product Development

3

BUS 635

Management of Entrepreneurial Enterprises

3

BUS 636

Financing Entrepreneurial Enterprises

3

BUS 638

Internet and Social Media Marketing

3

BUS 648

Creating Enduringly Successful Firms

3

BUS 660

Corporate Entrepreneurship

3

BUS 695

Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

1–4

emphasis in finance (12 credits)

four of the following

BUS 621

Investments

3

BUS 627

Advanced Corporate Finance

3

BUS 628

International Finance

3

BUS 632

Financial Reporting and Analysis

3

BUS 636

Financing Entrepreneurial Enterprises

3

BUS 694

Special Topics in Finance

1–4

emphasis in international business (12 credits)

four of the following

BUS 628

International Finance

3

BUS 633

International Marketing

3

BUS 650

International Business Law

3

BUS 657

Global Supply Chain Management

3

BUS 686

Building Cross–Cultural Business Competencies

3

BUS 687

International Business Travel Course

1–4

BUS 692

Special Topics in International Business

1–4

International business emphasis students must complete one international travel course or one course at Chapman's Prague campus.

emphasis in marketing (12 credits)

four of the following

BUS 624

Marketing Research

3

BUS 630

New Product Development

3

BUS 633

International Marketing

3

BUS 634

Marketing Strategy

3

BUS 638

Internet and Social Media Marketing

3

BUS 693

Special Topics in Marketing

1–4

Courses on the student's transcript designated with a "P" (e.g. BUS 602P) denote the class was taken on the Prague campus.

Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/Master of Business Administration

The Argyros School offers a specialized MBA program for Chapman University undergraduates, which enables students to begin taking MBA course work in the spring of the senior year and receive a Master of Business Administration within one year of finishing their undergraduate studies. The integrated program is open to all undergraduate majors and does not require any previous course work in business. Students completing the program will develop an understanding of all functional areas of business, an ability to communicate persuasively, a capacity for effective economic analysis and a global perspective. Additionally, students focus on career preparation with assistance provided by the MBA Career Management Center. 10 credits of specified graduate classes taken in the senior year may count toward the 124 credits required for the bachelor degree and may also count toward the MBA.

Admission to the program

Admission to the Chapman Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/MBA program is very competitive. Applicants are evaluated on academic performance, leadership potential, volunteer and internship experience and communication skills. Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Submit an application for admission in the spring of their junior year.
  2. Be enrolled at Chapman University and have completed 75 credits or more of undergraduate course work with a cumulative GPA of 3.250 or higher.
  3. Achieve a score of 600 or higher on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).
  4. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant's academic or professional abilities.
  5. Complete a personal interview.

Admission deadlines

Prospective students are encouraged to submit their application by the May 1 deadline for full consideration and first priority.

Scholarships for eligible students are awarded on the basis of the date of application to the Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/MBA program.

Requirements for the Integrated FiveYear Undergraduate/Master of Business Administration degree

senior year of undergraduate studies (spring semester) (10 credits)

BUS 600

Strategies for Competitive Advantage

1

BUS 601

Economic Analysis for Business

3

BUS 602

Accounting and Financial Analysis

3

BUS 604

Organization and Management

3

 

Any other course work necessary for bachelor's degree

 

MBA year (40 credits)

BUS 603

Statistics for Business Decisions

3

BUS 605

Marketing Management

3

BUS 606

Operations and Technology Management

3

BUS 607

Financial Management

3

BUS 609

Business Analytics

3

BUS 610

Understanding the Global Business Environment

4

BUS 612*

Strategic Management

4

BUS 613

Accounting for Management and Control

2

 

**Electives

15

total credits

 

50

*Registration for BUS 612 requires a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.000. The course must be passed with a grade of "B–" or higher.

**Up to three internship credits may be applied towards the elective requirement subject to approval by the Argyros School of Business and Economics Graduate Curriculum Committee.

Master of Business Administration in Prague

Chapman University and Anglo–American University (AAU) have partnered to offer a unique opportunity for students to earn an MBA in just 16 months in Prague, one of the world's most beautiful cities and the political, cultural and economic center of the Czech Republic. With an emphasis on strategy formulation, execution and evaluation, the Chapman MBA in Prague requires students to earn a total of 50 credits, including 12 core and five elective courses. The program is taught by both Chapman faculty and AAU faculty with Chapman faculty on site in Prague teaching 60 percent of the courses in the program.

Joint Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration

In conjunction with the Chapman University Fowler School of Law, the Argyros School of Business and Economics offers a joint program leading to both the Juris Doctor (JD) and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degrees. Offered to full–time students, the program requires four years of study and acceptance to both the Chapman University Fowler School of Law and the Argyros School of Business and Economics. The JD/MBA program gives students the opportunity to obtain two highly marketable professional degrees.

Advantages of earning your JD/MBA at Chapman over earning the degrees separately:

The School of Law offers an 88–credit, six semester full–time JD program while the Argyros School of Business and Economics offers an MBA program that consists of 50 credits and is typically completed by full–time students in four semesters. The two programs, combined into the joint degree, require the completion of only 122 credits, a savings of 16 credits, resulting from the cross–application of completed course work in the two schools.

Students must satisfy the minimum requirements for each degree program including course requirements, GPA, residency and other requirements listed in the graduate catalog.

Sample curriculum for JD/MBA

first year

fall (15 credits) one credit of residency

LAW 7103

Torts I

3

LAW 7105

Legal Research and Writing I

3

LAW 7107

Contracts I

3

LAW 7122

Property I

3

LAW 7130

Civil Procedure I

3

spring (16 credits) one credit of residency

LAW 7110

Criminal Law

3

LAW 7115

Torts II

3

LAW 7119

Contracts II

3

LAW 7124

Property II

3

LAW 7132

Civil Procedure II

2

LAW 7135

Legal Research and Writing II

2

second year

fall (16 credits) one credit of residency, eight cross–count credits towards JD

BUS 600

Strategies for Competitive Advantage

1

BUS 601

Economic Analysis for Business

3

BUS 602

Accounting and Financial Analysis

3

BUS 603

Statistics for Business Decisions

3

BUS 605

Marketing Management

3

BUS 607

Financial Management

3

spring (14 credits)

BUS 604

Organization and Management

3

BUS 606

Operations and Technology Management

3

BUS 609

Business Analytics

3

BUS 613

Accounting for Management and Control

2

LAW 7145

Corporations

3

third year

fall (16 credits) one credit of residency

BUS 610

Understanding the Global Business Environment

4

LAW 7127

Constitutional Law I (may move to fall fourth year and substitute three credit law elective here)

3

LAW 7133

Federal Income Tax

3

LAW 7139

Professional Responsibility (may move to spring third year to earn residency there instead)

2

LAW 7142

Evidence

4

spring (14 credits)

BUS 612*

Strategic Management

4

LAW 7129

Constitutional Law II (may move to spring fourth year and substitute a three credit law elective here)

3

 

Law Elective

3

 

Law Elective

4

fourth year (31 credits, two credits of residency)

 

MBA elective

3

 

Law electives

28

total credits

 

122

*Registration for BUS 612 requires a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.000. The course must be passed with a grade of "B–" or higher.

Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Fine Arts in Film and Television Producing

In conjunction with the Lawrence and Kristina Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, the Argyros School of Business and Economics offers a joint program leading to both an MBA degree and an M.F.A. in Film and Television Producing degree. Offered to full–time students, the program requires three years of study and acceptance to both the Argyros School of Business and Economics and the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts. The MBA/M.F.A. in Film and Television Producing gives students the opportunity to obtain two highly marketable professional degrees designed for individuals seeking a management or executive level position at a production company, talent agency, studio or television network.

Students must satisfy the minimum requirements for each degree program including course requirements, GPA, residency and other requirements listed in the graduate catalog.

For more information on the MBA/M.F.A. in Film and Television Producing program, please see the Dodge College section of the catalog.

Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Food Science

In conjunction with the Chapman University's Schmid College of Science and Technology, the Argyros School of Business and Economics offers a joint program leading to both the MBA and M.S. in Food Science degrees. Offered to full–time and part–time students, the program requires acceptance into the Professional MBA program at the Argyros School of Business and Economics and the M.S. in Food Science program in the Schmid College of Science and Technology.

Students must satisfy the minimum requirements for each degree program including course requirements, GPA, residency and other requirements listed in the graduate catalog.

For more information on the Joint MBA/M.S. in Food Science program, please see the Schmid College of Science and Technology section of the graduate catalog.

Executive Master of Business Administration

The Executive MBA serves individuals with significant professional experience. Classes for this 21–month program meet Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings. Special features include one–on–one executive coaching and residential courses to Asia, Washington D.C. and San Diego County.

Admission to the program

Admission to the Chapman Executive MBA program is competitive. Applicants are evaluated on professional experience, leadership ability and prior academic performance. Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Submit the application for admission.
  2. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  3. Achieve an undergraduate grade point average of 2.500 or higher.
  4. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required only for those EMBA applicants with an undergraduate grade point average of less than 3.000.
  5. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or professional abilities.
  6. Complete a personal interview.

The Executive MBA program enrolls students for the fall semester only. Students with a 3.000 or higher undergraduate grade point average may receive a Chapman tuition grant based on overall strength of the application including GMAT performance. Scholarships for eligible students are awarded on the basis of the date of application to the Argyros School of Business and Economics.

Requirements for the Executive Master of Business Administration degree

The Executive MBA is a broad–based program with courses in each functional area of business. Students must take courses as a cohort in the sequence in which they are offered. The residential portions of EMBA 600, EMBA 611 and EMBA 614 are program requirements and are not optional. Failure to enroll in a course when it is offered or withdrawing from a course prior to its completion is equivalent to withdrawing from the program. Students who withdraw must be readmitted to the program before resuming studies.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade. A grade of incomplete may be awarded only in special circumstances and in accordance with university policy as detailed in the academic policies and procedures section of this catalog. If an EMBA student receives a grade of incomplete, the student may not enroll in subsequent courses until the requirements of the incomplete course are satisfied and the incomplete is changed to a letter grade.

Any action that is not in strict compliance with these policies must be approved by the Graduate Curriculum Committee of the Argyros School of Business and Economics and requires that the student submit a petition for exception of program requirements to the Graduate Curriculum Committee. Approval of petitions is granted only under exceptional circumstances.

The Executive MBA curriculum is comprised of the following courses:

core courses (37 credits)

EMBA 600

Creating and Sustaining Competitive Advantage (residential)

2

EMBA 601

Economic Analysis and Policy

4

EMBA 602

Financial Information Systems

4

EMBA 603

Applied Statistics

2

EMBA 604

Managing Effective Organizations

4

EMBA 605

Marketing Management

4

EMBA 606

Operations and Technology Management

4

EMBA 607

Managerial Finance

4

EMBA 611

Understanding the Global Business Environment

6

EMBA 614

Business and Public Policy (residential)

3

capstone course (4 credits)

EMBA 612

Strategic Management

4

electives (8 credits)

All eight elective credits must be earned in 600–level BUS courses.

8

total credits

 

49

Master of Science in Accounting

The Master of Science in Accounting is a one–year master’s program designed to qualify graduates to sit for the California CPA exam. Students normally enter the program after completing a bachelor’s degree in accounting. Students who have insufficient undergraduate course work will need to complete the prerequisites before enrolling in graduate accounting courses.

Admission to the program

Admission to the M.S. in Accounting program is competitive. Applicants are evaluated on academic performance, professional potential and communication skills. Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Submit the application for admission.
  2. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  3. Achieve an undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.500 or higher.
  4. Achieve an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
  5. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or professional abilities.
  6. Foreign applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States may be required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Transfer of credit and waiver of prerequisites

The program consists of 34 credits of prerequisite courses and 30 credits of graduate course work. Students who have completed equivalent course work at an accredited university may waive the prerequisite requirements on a course–by–course basis. Students who have taken graduate business or accounting courses in other AACSB–accredited universities may transfer up to six graduate credits with approval of the Argyros School of Business and Economics.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Accounting degree

prerequisites (34 credits)

MGSC 209

Introductory Business Statistics

3

BUS 215

Legal Environment of Business

3

BUS 216

Business Ethics

1

MGMT 316

Management of Organizations

3

FIN 317

Financial Management

3

ACTG 320

Cost Accounting I

3

ACTG 330

Intermediate Financial Accounting I

3

ACTG 331

Intermediate Financial Accounting II

3

ACTG 439

Accounting Information Systems

3

ACTG 450

Individual Taxation

3

ACTG 451

Taxation of Corporations and Other Entities

3

ACTG 460

Auditing

3

master of science degree

requirements (9 credits)

BUS 601

Economic Analysis for Business

3

BUS 609

Business Analytics

3

BUS 632

Financial Reporting and Analysis

3

accounting electives (9 credits)

three of the following

ACTG 540

Advanced Accounting I–Investments and Consolidations

3

ACTG 541

Advanced Accounting II–Not–for Profit and International Accounting

3

ACTG 561

Forensic and Fraud Detection

3

ACTG 571

Advanced Business Law for Accountants

3

business or accounting electives (9 credits)

nine elective credits at the 500 or 600–level

9

capstone course (3 credits)

ACTG 681

Professional Ethics and Responsibilities in Accounting

3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

30

Master of Science in Economic Systems Design

This unique program is open to any student with a strong mathematical or computational background. It complements the preparation of students who have received undergraduate degrees in business, economics, computer science, mathematics and psychology. Admission is limited to highly qualified students with a completed bachelor's degree and appropriate prerequisites. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.500 or higher to remain in the M.S. in Economic Systems Design program.

Admission requirements

Requirements for the Master of Science in Economic Systems Design degree

prerequisites (17 credits)

prerequisites must completed with a 3.600 GPA or higher

MATH 210*

Multivariable Calculus

3

CPSC 236*

Visual Programming

3

MATH 361*

Mathematical Statistics or

3

MGSC 406*

Advanced Experimental Design and Statistics

 

ECON 471**

Experimental Economics I

3

ECON 481**

Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

3

ECON 489**

Seminar in Economic Science

2

*Equivalent preparation may be used to fulfill these requirements.

**ECON 471, 481, 489 will be taken at Chapman University when admitted to the M.S. in Economic Systems Design program.

master of science degree

requirements (31 credits)

MGSC 530

Computational Economics

4

ECON 564

Game Theory

3

ECON 582

Economic Systems Design II: Case Studies and Analysis

4

ECON 683

Economic Systems Design III

4

ECON 685

Economic Systems Design Lab I

4

ECON 686

Economic Systems Design Lab II

4

ECON 691

Economic Systems Design Thesis I

4

ECON 692

Economic Systems Design Thesis II

4

total credits

 

31

Integrated Five–Year Undergraduate/Master of Science in Economic Systems Design

This unique program is open to all Chapman University undergraduates or admitted transfer students who have a strong mathematical or computational background. Chapman University undergraduates will have the opportunity to obtain a bachelor's degree of their choice and a M.S. in Economic Systems Design with just one additional year of study. Before the end of their senior year, students admitted into this program are required to take eight credit hours of graduate M.S. in Economic Systems Design course work in addition to prerequisites.

Admission requirements

Additional requirements for transfer students

Requirements for the Master of Science in Economic Systems Design degree

undergraduate prerequisite courses (25 credits)

MATH 210*

Multivariable Calculus

3

CPSC 236*

Visual Programming

3

MATH 361*

Mathematical Statistics or

3

MGSC 406*

Advanced Experimental Design and Statistics

 

ECON 471*

Experimental Economics I

3

ECON 481

Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

3

ECON 489

Seminar in Economic Science

2

MGSC 530**

Computational Economics

4

ECON 582**

Economic Systems Design II: Case Studies and Analysis

4

*Equivalent preparation may be used to fulfill these requirements.

M.S. requirements (31 credits)

MGSC 530**

Computational Economics

4

ECON 564

Game Theory

3

ECON 582**

Economic Systems Design II: Case Studies and Analysis

4

ECON 683

Economic Systems Design III

4

ECON 685

Economic Systems Design Lab I

4

ECON 686

Economic Systems Design Lab II

4

ECON 691

Economic Systems Design Thesis I

4

ECON 692

Economic Systems Design Thesis II

4

total credits

 

31

**Integrated students will complete these graduate courses as an undergraduate; however, the credits will also be used to satisfy the M.S. in Economic Systems Design degree requirements. The remaining required courses will be completed in the additional year of study.

Course Descriptions – Accounting

ACTG 540 Advanced Accounting I – Investments and Consolidations

Prerequisite, ACTG 331, or equivalent. Comprehensive coverage of accounting for investments and complex entities including mergers and acquisitions and consolidated financial statements. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ACTG 541 Advanced Accounting II – Not-for Profit and International Accounting

Prerequisite, ACTG 540, or equivalent. A continuation of ACTG 540. Focus on not-for-profit and government entities, accounting for multinational transactions including foreign currency translation, international accounting standards, partnerships and trusts. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ACTG 561 Forensic and Fraud Accounting

Prerequisite, ACTG 331, or equivalent. Detection of employee and financial statement fraud, financial damages in litigation and commercial property insurance, lost earnings for individuals, and business valuation. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ACTG 571 Advanced Business Law for Accountants

Prerequisite, BUS 215, or equivalent. Business law topics covered on the Regulation section of the CPA exam. These topics include contracts, sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, suretyship, creditors’ rights, agency, bankruptcy, securities regulation, CPA legal liability, and the formation of various business entities. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ACTG 681 Professional Ethics and Responsibilities in Accounting

Prerequisite, accounting major. A comprehensive coverage of ethical and professional issues encountered by accounting professionals. The course helps students cultivate the ethical commitment needed to ensure that their work meets the highest standards of integrity, independence, objectivity and professionalism. Ethical obligations, professional standards and their impact on decisions in a professional accounting setting. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Business

Information about the course numbering system is available in the Academic Policies and Procedures section of this catalog. In the Argyros School of Business and Economics, 600 level courses are limited to graduate students.

BUS 600 Strategies for Competitive Advantage

Prerequisite, admission to the MBA program. Introduction to the techniques and tools used to identify and exploit business strategies to create value. Specifically, this course develops an understanding of the sources of competitive advantage by focusing on the quantity and quality of resources available to the firm and on the opportunities and threats that shape the firm’s competitive environment with an emphasis on how the expectations of society can be integrated with strategic economic decision-making. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

BUS 601 Economic Analysis for Business

Prerequisite, students on 2013-14 catalog, or after. Corequisite, BUS 600. This course examines the application of economic analysis to business decision-making. The course integrates the elements of macroeconomics and economic policies, applied microeconomics and international economics. Particular emphasis is placed on the role and importance of business conditions in business decisions, the theory of demand, the determination of price through the interaction of supply and demand, market structure and price determination, analysis of costs and supply, and pricing in factors in production. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

BUS 602 Accounting and Financial Analysis

Prerequisite, students on 2013-14 catalog, or after. Corequisite, BUS 600. Exploration of the use and analysis of financial and managerial accounting reports and information. The use of accounting information in financial contracts and performance evaluation and the ethical issues underlying the presentation and use of accounting information are highlighted. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 603 Statistics for Business Decisions

Corequisite, BUS 600. This course provides students with the statistical tools and conceptual framework to make informed management decisions. Data are described by their central tendency and dispersion characteristics. Sampling theory, sampling distributions, statistical inference, and testing of hypotheses as applied to economic and business problems. Correlation, regression analysis, and index numbers form a major component of this course. Statistical applications and the use of computers are an integral part of the course material. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 604 Organization and Management

Prerequisite, students on 2013-14 catalog, or after. Corequisites, BUS 600, 601. For organizations to create value they must have the capability to react to market opportunities quickly. This course introduces the tools, techniques, and skills necessary to increase the capacity of firms to do that. Building on insights from economics, this course teaches students how to align incentives, identify and change employee preferences, assign decision rights, and select and retain appropriate employees. Most importantly, this course will describe how a firm can be designed and managed to reduce the bureaucratic behavior that destroys value in organizations. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

BUS 604A Organization and Management

Prerequisite, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier. Corequisites, BUS 600, BUS 601. For organizations to create value they must have the capability to react to market opportunities quickly. This course introduces the tools, techniques, and skills necessary to increase the capacity of firms to do that. Building on insights from economics, this course teaches students how to align incentives, identify and change employee preferences, assign decision rights, and select and retain appropriate employees. Most importantly, this course will describe how a firm can be designed and managed to reduce the bureaucratic behavior that destroys value in organizations. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 605 Marketing Management

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 603, or enrollment in the full-time MBA program. In the highly competitive global environment, market-oriented thinking and sound marketing management can make the difference between success and failure. Students examine such topics as customer satisfaction and retention, marketing research, market segmentation, promotion , product and pricing decisions. The course features a semester-long marketing simulation project and several case analysis. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

BUS 605A Marketing Management

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 601, 602, 603. In the highly competitive global environment, market-oriented thinking and sound marketing management can make the difference between success and failure. Students examine such topics as customer satisfaction and retention, marketing research, market segmentation, promotion , product and pricing decisions. The course features a semester-long marketing simulation project and several case analysis. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 606 Operations and Technology Management

Prerequisites, students on 2013-14 catalog, or after, and BUS 602, 603. Corequisite, BUS 609. In this course, students analyze the management of operations and technology in both production and service industries. Topics include operations and technology strategy, project management, product and process design, capacity and location planning, supply chain management, and total quality management. Students examine the tradeoffs involved in operation decisions and the application of software tools to solve these problems. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 606A Operations and Technology Management

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 602, 603. In this course, students analyze the management of operations and technology in both production and service industries. Topics include operations and technology strategy, project management, product and process design, capacity and location planning, supply chain management, and total quality management. Students examine the tradeoffs involved in operation decisions and the application of software tools to solve these problems. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 607 Financial Management

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 603, or enrollment in the full-time MBA program. Good financial decisions enhance firm value. This course examines the issues faced by corporate financial managers and the tools and techniques for creating value. Topics include the risk-return tradeoff, financial statement analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, the cost of capital, and capital budgeting. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

BUS 607A Financial Management

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 601, 602, 603. Good financial decisions enhance firm value. This course examines the issues faced by corporate financial managers and the tools and techniques for creating value. Topics include the risk-return tradeoff, financial statement analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, the cost of capital, and capital budgeting. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BUS 609 Business Analytics

Prerequisite, BUS 603. This course focuses on business analytics and mathematical modeling. Extending the skills obtained in the statistics course (BUS 603), this class focuses on models for prescriptive and predictive analytics as well as structured decision making under uncertainty. Multiple regression modeling, business forecasting, Monte Carlo simulation, risk modeling applications will be covered, as well as optimization including linear, integer and non-linear programming. Decision analysis will make up the final major topic of the course. The course emphasizes applications that are useful for managerial decision making in operations, marketing and finance settings. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 610 Understanding the Global Business Environment

Prerequisites, BUS 604, or 604A, and 605, or 605A, and 607, or 607A. Students acquire analytical skills to assess the dynamic nature of the globalization process, including the ability to relate course concepts to current international news events, and to integrate such knowledge structures into value-creation strategies for global organizations. Students will also develop the ability to apply international business concepts, via case study analysis, to problems and challenges facing firms which compete in the global economy. The course features a semester long group project wherein students develop the ability to research, write, and present a plan to develop an international business opportunity for a real firm. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

BUS 612 Strategic Management

Prerequisites, BUS 600, 609, 613, cumulative GPA of 3.000 in MBA course work, and BUS 601, 602, 603, and BUS 604, or 604A, and BUS 605, or 605A, and BUS 606, or 606A, and BUS 607, or 607A. This course relies heavily on the case method of instruction to apply strategic analyses and techniques. Students focus on the requirements for sustaining competitive advantage and the implications of these requirements for market positioning, diversification, acquisitions, joint ventures, corporate restructuring, and other decisions that can significantly affect firm value. This course also requires students to demonstrate significant business research and presentation skills by forming teams to analyze a strategic issue facing an actual firm. Recommendations based on that analysis are presented and defended orally and in writing and judged by a panel of professors and business leaders. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BUS 612A Strategic Management

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog or earlier, and BUS 600, 601, 602, 603, and BUS 604, or 604A, and BUS 605, or 605A, and BUS 606, or 606A, and BUS 607, or 607A, and a cumulative GPA of 3.000 in MBA course work. This course relies heavily on the case method of instruction to apply strategic analyses and techniques. Students focus on the requirements for sustaining competitive advantage and the implications of these requirements for market positioning, diversification, acquisitions, joint ventures, corporate restructuring, and other decisions that can significantly affect firm value. This course also requires students to demonstrate significant business research and presentation skills by forming teams to analyze a strategic issue facing an actual firm. Recommendations based on that analysis are presented and defended orally and in writing and judged by a panel of professors and business leaders. Some sections of this course will be restricted to students admitted to specific degree programs. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BUS 613 Accounting for Management and Control

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 603. This course examines the use of accounting information for management decision-making. The determination of product costs as well as the use of accounting information for planning, control and evaluation of business activities is emphasized. We will examine alternative approaches to the application of managerial accounting, with an emphasis on normative models of the use of information in decision contexts and the impact that accounting information has on behavior within the organization. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

BUS 621 Investments

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. Investment principles and practices, emphasis on the problems of the investor. The evaluation, selection, and management of securities; investment principles; trading methods and valuation; different types of investments and savings; sources of information available to assure wise investing; and interpretation of financial statements. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 621A Investments

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 607, or BUS 607A, or EMBA 607. Investment principles and practices, emphasis on the problems of the investor. The evaluation, selection, and management of securities; investment principles; trading methods and valuation; different types of investments and savings; sources of information available to assure wise investing; and interpretation of financial statements. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 624 Marketing Research

Prerequisites, BUS 603, 605, or EMBA 603, 605. This course guides students in identifying a firm's marketing research problem (or opportunity) as it relates to its market, product, price, promotion, distribution, and/or the external environment. Students develop solutions by implementing the marketing research process. Emphasis is placed on the planning, investigating, collecting and interpreting data, and presenting results. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits..

BUS 624A Marketing Research

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 603, or EMBA 603, and BUS 605, or BUS 605A, or EMBA 605. This course guides students in identifying a firm's marketing research problem (or opportunity) as it relates to its market, product, price, promotion, distribution, and/or the external environment. Students develop solutions by implementing the marketing research process. Emphasis is placed on the planning, investigating, collecting and interpreting data, and presenting results. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 627 Advanced Corporate Finance

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. This course emphasizes the analysis of the current/future practices and issues in the area of corporate finance. Topics include valuation, capital markets, management of short-term assets and liabilities, capital structure, capital budgeting, the cost of capital, investment decisions, merger and acquisitions, and corporate use of derivatives. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits..

BUS 627A Advanced Corporate Finance

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 607, or 607A, or EMBA 607. This course emphasizes the analysis of the current/future practices and issues in the area of corporate finance. Topics include valuation, capital markets, management of short-term assets and liabilities, capital structure, capital budgeting, the cost of capital, investment decisions, merger and acquisitions, and corporate use of derivatives. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 628 International Finance

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. Introduction to international financial markets and application of the principles of international financial management. Topics include foreign exchange systems and markets for foreign exchange, determination of exchange rates, international monetary systems, international corporate governance mechanisms and management of exchange rate risk, problems unique to international operations, international sources and uses of funds, long–term assets and liability management, and capital budgeting and corporate financial strategy in an international context. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 628A International Finance

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 607, or 607A, or EMBA 607. Introduction to international financial markets and application of the principles of international financial management. Topics include foreign exchange systems and markets for foreign exchange, determination of exchange rates, international monetary systems, international corporate governance mechanisms and management of exchange rate risk, problems unique to international operations, international sources and uses of funds, long–term assets and liability management, and capital budgeting and corporate financial strategy in an international context. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 630 New Product Development

Prerequisite, BUS 605, or EMBA 605. The focus of the course is the management of the new product development process for both established firms and start-ups. Development and successful commercialization of new products and services are crucial to increase sales, profits, and even company survival rate in competitive industries. The course examines new product/service development from opportunity identification through launch. Best industry practices, development team dynamics, integration of products and services to offer higher value/benefits to users, sales forecasting, and a semester-long marketing plan project are cornerstones of the course. Students who take this class should be committed to participating fully in a team project. Teams typically meet for 1-3 hours per week outside class throughout the semester. (This is in addition to individual time spent preparing for class discussion.) The course is intended as a hands-on experience of the product development process. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 630A New Product Development

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog or earlier, and BUS 605, or 605A, or EMBA 605. The focus of the course is the management of the new product development process for both established firms and start-ups. Development and successful commercialization of new products and services are crucial to increase sales, profits, and even company survival rate in competitive industries. The course examines new product/service development from opportunity identification through launch. Best industry practices, development team dynamics, integration of products and services to offer higher value/benefits to users, sales forecasting, and a semester-long marketing plan project are cornerstones of the course. Students who take this class should be committed to participating fully in a team project. Teams typically meet for 1-3 hours per week outside class throughout the semester. (This is in addition to individual time spent preparing for class discussion.) The course is intended as a hands-on experience of the product development process. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 631 Derivative Securities and Markets

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. Analyses of financial options, futures, and other derivative securities. The course develops a framework for the use of securities in hedging financial risk. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 632 Financial Reporting and Analysis

Prerequisites, BUS 602, 607, or EMBA 602, 607. BUS 607, or EMBA 607 may be taken concurrently with consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. Selected topics in financial reporting and financial statement analysis. Examines the link between the financial reporting process and capital markets and the use of financial accounting information in investment and credit decisions. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 632A Financial Reporting and Analysis

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 602, and 607, or 607A, or EMBA 602, EMBA 607. BUS 607, or 607A, or EMBA 607 may be taken concurrently with consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. Selected topics in financial reporting and financial statement analysis. Examines the link between the financial reporting process and capital markets and the use of financial accounting information in investment and credit decisions. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 633 International Marketing

Prerequisite, BUS 605, or EMBA 605. Study of international marketing opportunities and constraints, including cultural differences, political and legal issues, and economic concerns. This course will serve as an introduction to the complex issues that are critical to the success of an international business. Special attention will be focused on examining and evaluating global marketing opportunities and developing marketing strategies to capitalize on these opportunities. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 633A International Marketing

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog or earlier, and BUS 605 or 605A, or EMBA 605. Study of international marketing opportunities and constraints, including cultural differences, political and legal issues, and economic concerns. This course will serve as an introduction to the complex issues that are critical to the success of an international business. Special attention will be focused on examining and evaluating global marketing opportunities and developing marketing strategies to capitalize on these opportunities. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 634 Marketing Strategy

Prerequisite, BUS 605, or EMBA 605. This course provides a comprehensive framework for the development of competitive marketing strategies. The course is cross-functional in its focus, attempting (where appropriate) to integrate marketing issues with financial, operating, and other key functional issues. Conventional marketing strategy assumptions are challenged, and alternative paradigms for achieving strategic success are proposed. The course focuses on business-level marketing strategy, rather than corporate strategy or business policy. Students develop new perspectives for creating innovative marketing strategies that achieve organizational objectives and build competitive advantage. The course features a semester-long marketing simulation project. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 634A Marketing Strategy

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 605, or 605A, or EMBA 605. This course provides a comprehensive framework for the development of competitive marketing strategies. The course is cross-functional in its focus, attempting (where appropriate) to integrate marketing issues with financial, operating, and other key functional issues. Conventional marketing strategy assumptions are challenged, and alternative paradigms for achieving strategic success are proposed. The course focuses on business-level marketing strategy, rather than corporate strategy or business policy. Students develop new perspectives for creating innovative marketing strategies that achieve organizational objectives and build competitive advantage. The course features a semester-long marketing simulation project. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 635 Management of Entrepreneurial Enterprises

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 603, 604, or EMBA 601, 602, 603, 604. BUS 604, or EMBA 604 may be taken concurrently with consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. This seminar introduces students to the basic activities required to successfully manage an entrepreneurial enterprise. Topics include generating entrepreneurial ideas, assessing the potential of new ventures, developing business plans, attracting capital, and taking a business public. In addition, legal issues associated with new ventures will be discussed. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 635A Management of Entrepreneurial Enterprises

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 601, 602, 603, and 604, or BUS 604A, or EMBA 601, 602, 603, 604. BUS 604, or 604A, or EMBA 604 may be taken concurrently with consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. This seminar introduces students to the basic activities required to successfully manage an entrepreneurial enterprise. Topics include generating entrepreneurial ideas, assessing the potential of new ventures, developing business plans, attracting capital, and taking a business public. In addition, legal issues associated with new ventures will be discussed. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 636 Financing Entrepreneurial Enterprises

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. This course provides an in-depth examination of financial issues of particular importance to entrepreneurs. Topics include estimating capital requirements and risk, identifying and evaluating sources of capital, and liquidity events. Issues associated with structuring partnership arrangements and other alliances are also discussed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 636A Financing Entrepreneurial Enterprises

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 607, or 607A, or EMBA 607. This course provides an in-depth examination of financial issues of particular importance to entrepreneurs. Topics include estimating capital requirements and risk, identifying and evaluating sources of capital, and liquidity events. Issues associated with structuring partnership arrangements and other alliances are also discussed. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 637 Financial Markets and Institutions

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. Analysis of financial markets, instruments trading in capital and money markets, and the management of financial institutions. The course develops a framework for discussing the structure of major financial intermediaries and non-intermediaries, portfolio composition, impact of government regulation, and interrelation of financial institutions and markets. Topics include analysis of the demand and supply of loanable funds, the instruments and organization of money and capital markets, financial flows and the impact of public policy, and term and risk structure of interest rates. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 638 Internet and Social Media Marketing

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 603, 605, or EMBA 601, 602, 603, 605. BUS 605, or EMBA 605 may be taken concurrently with the consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. This course provides a contemporary view of how the Internet and social media technologies revolutionize marketing planning and execution. Study units include Internet marketing strategy and business models, online buying behavior, electronic commerce, online traffic generation, and social media marketing. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 639 Mergers, Acquisitions, and Corporate Restructuring

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. This seminar focuses on the critical corporate level strategic decisions that managers must make about the combination of assets a firm will hold and how those assets will be deployed and integrated to sustain a competitive advantage. Topics include mergers and acquisitions, strategic alliances, leveraged buyouts, divestitures, corporate restructuring, and related governance issues. Particular emphasis will be placed on mergers and acquisitions. Students learn how to value and structure acquisitions, and how to manage them to achieve their greatest contribution to firm value. Hostile takeovers, friendly mergers, and acquisitions of entrepreneurial enterprises are addressed in detail. Guest speakers with directly relevant experience are invited to address the class. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 640 Leadership and Corporate Governance

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 604. This course offers opportunity to examine current leadership practices and their application in corporate governance and organizational transformation. The rapid rate of change brought on by technological advances, globalization, ethical and economic turmoil are placing unprecedented demands on profit and non-profit boards and business leaders at all levels. Leadership and corporate governance "best practices" and current research will be discussed and understood through the extensive use of case studies, experiential exercises and group/individual projects to better prepare students to succeed as future leaders and board members. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 641 Portfolio Management

Prerequisite, BUS 621. The course will focus on the application of financial theory to the issues and problems of security selection, portfolio theory and construction, financial futures, risk and return in investments, and will involve management of actual portfolios. The course will build upon the analytical skills developed in BUS 621. Students in this course oversee the student managed investment fund. The University has allocated $1 million for students to manage by investing in an equity portfolio benchmarked to the S&P 500. A major activity of this course will be to select industry weights and individual securities for the portfolio. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 641A Portfolio Management

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 621, or BUS 621A. The course will focus on the application of financial theory to the issues and problems of security selection, portfolio theory and construction, financial futures, risk and return in investments, and will involve management of actual portfolios. The course will build upon the analytical skills developed in BUS 621. Students in this course oversee the student managed investment fund. The University has allocated $1 million for students to manage by investing in an equity portfolio benchmarked to the S&P 500. A major activity of this course will be to select industry weights and individual securities for the portfolio. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 645 Human Resources Management

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Students learn a systems approach to managing human resources in organizations. Topics include environmental scanning, managing diversity, legal issues, strategic HR, job analysis, performance appraisal, recruitment and selection, workforce reductions, career development, training, compensation, benefits, and labor and employee relations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 645A Human Resources Management

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Students learn a systems approach to managing human resources in organizations. Topics include environmental scanning, managing diversity, legal issues, strategic HR, job analysis, performance appraisal, recruitment and selection, workforce reductions, career development, training, compensation, benefits, and labor and employee relations. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 648 Creating Enduringly Successful Firms

Prerequisite, BUS 610, or with consent of instructor BUS 610 may be taken concurrently. An exploration of reasons why so many firms cease to exist after just a handful of years. Case studies of several hundred year old firms are contrasted with leaders that are disappearing. The central focus is on developing and applying an inductive model of factors contributing to enduring economic success. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 648A Creating Enduringly Successful Firms

Prerequisite, BUS 610, or with consent of instructor BUS 610 may be taken concurrently. An exploration of reasons why so many firms cease to exist after just a handful of years. Case studies of several hundred year old firms are contrasted with leaders that are disappearing. The central focus is on developing and applying an inductive model of factors contributing to enduring economic success. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 650 International Business Law

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, 604, or EMBA 601, 602, 604. Introduction to legal issues surrounding international commerce including contracting, international shipping, and liability of air and ocean carriers. Students in this class will become familiar with various areas of regulation of international business, such as competition law, employment discrimination law, and environmental law. Topics include international and U.S. trade law, including GATT 1994, and the regulation of imports and exports. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 652 Conflict and Negotiation

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Students analyze the nature, types, and stages of conflict and conflict resolution, focusing on conflict within and between persons, groups, and organizations. Negotiation and resolution techniques are examined and applied. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 652A Conflict and Negotiation

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Students analyze the nature, types, and stages of conflict and conflict resolution, focusing on conflict within and between persons, groups, and organizations. Negotiation and resolution techniques are examined and applied. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 655 Service Management

Prerequisite, BUS 606, or EMBA 606. Given the importance of services in our economy and the enormous employment potential in the service sector, this course aims at analyzing service systems from the viewpoint of an operations manager. The operational issues unique to service organizations are identified and discussed using case discussions, readings, and text assignments. While building on the concepts underlying Service Operations Management, the course is designed to equip graduate students with some quantitative tools that are used to make better decisions in the ‘real world.’ (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 656 Project Management

Prerequisites, BUS 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, or EMBA 602, 603, 604, 605, 606. This course focuses on the essential managerial skills for managing projects, including innovation and development of new products, services, and systems; selection, procurement, and implementation of new technology; (re)location and (re)configuration of facilities; mergers and acquisitions; maintenance projects; and organizing and hosting events. Using a project management framework, students will learn about the issues, problems, and solutions involved in carrying out a team project from start to finish. Students will use the Microsoft Project and Crystal Ball software programs to manage a real-world project. Topics include project selection, project planning, budgeting, project scheduling, resource allocation, resource leveling, project monitoring and evaluation, team building, and supportive communication. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 657 Global Supply Chain Management

Prerequisite, BUS 606, or EMBA 606. This course explores the key issues associated with the design and management of supply chains, providing an overview of the concepts and decision processes in effectively managing the flow of goods, services, and information in a global environment. Topics covered include a strategic framework for supply chain management, managing inventories in the supply chain, strategic positioning of safety stocks, logistics and supply chain strategies, integrated supply management, global sourcing, supply chain design and operation, design for supply chain principles, risk pooling, supply chain coordination and bullwhip effect, supply chain related strategic alliances, the role of information technology in the supply chain, and emerging trends in supply chain management. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 658 Information Technology for Sustainable Competitive Advantage

Prerequisite, BUS 606, or EMBA 606. This course develops skills to ensure the organization information systems (IS) and technologies support the competitive position of the firm. Fundamental technologies supporting today’s businesses are presented. Organizational and financial models for managing and funding information systems and process/systems improvement projects are discussed. Modern process enabling technology and information systems implementation project management are examined. Finally, students will investigate business architectures that enable competitive advantage. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 658A Information Technology for Sustainable Competitive Advantage

Prerequisite, BUS 606, or 606A, or EMBA 606. This course develops skills to ensure the organization information systems (IS) and technologies support the competitive position of the firm. Fundamental technologies supporting today’s businesses are presented. Organizational and financial models for managing and funding information systems and process/systems improvement projects are discussed. Modern process enabling technology and information systems implementation project management are examined. Finally, students will investigate business architectures that enable competitive advantage. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 660 Corporate Entrepreneurship

Prerequisites, BUS 604, 605, or EMBA 604, 605. BUS 605, or EMBA 605 may be taken concurrently with the consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. This graduate seminar focuses upon the necessity of creativity and innovation for individual and organizational success in dynamic and competitive environments. The course reviews recent advances in theoretical and applied models of creativity and innovation on different levels of analysis: global innovativeness and competitiveness of nations, industry level analysis of creativity and innovation in high technology sectors with consideration of government support of technology development, organizational level analysis of successful and unsuccessful case illustrations, and individual managerial level of analysis of creativity. Students will be actively engaged as a participant in this seminar with required individual research, experiential exercises, reflection assignments, and group/individual presentations. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 660A Corporate Entrepreneurship

Prerequisites, students on 2012-13 catalog, or earlier, and BUS 604, or 604A, and 605, or 605A, or EMBA 604, 605. BUS 605, or 605A, or EMBA 605 may be taken concurrently with the consent of the Associate Director of Graduate Programs. This graduate seminar focuses upon the necessity of creativity and innovation for individual and organizational success in dynamic and competitive environments. The course reviews recent advances in theoretical and applied models of creativity and innovation on different levels of analysis: global innovativeness and competitiveness of nations, industry level analysis of creativity and innovation in high technology sectors with consideration of government support of technology development, organizational level analysis of successful and unsuccessful case illustrations, and individual managerial level of analysis of creativity. Students will be actively engaged as a participant in this seminar with required individual research, experiential exercises, reflection assignments, and group/individual presentations. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

BUS 670 Foundations in Real Estate

Prerequisites, BUS 601, 602, or EMBA 601, 602. This course explores fundamental concepts related to real estate markets, institutions, and functions. The course examines the physical, legal, regulatory, economic, and tax considerations that influence real estate decisions. Topics include real estate brokerage and listing, contracts for sale and closing, appraisal, types of residential and commercial mortgages, and risks associated with real estate investing. Discussion of the current state of real estate markets will be an important component of the course. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BUS 685 Seminar in Business Consulting

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. This course reviews: the history of the business consulting industry, recent trends in the consulting industry structure and demand, concepts on the phases/steps in the consulting process, review of tools used by business consultants, and the course provides students an opportunity to apply classroom concepts to real-world consulting projects. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BUS 686 Building Cross-Cultural Business Competencies

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Students will evaluate how differences in national, corporate, and professional culture can best be orchestrated to maximize firm value. The course will also address the applicability of Western management techniques across cultures. The class will feature a series of classroom lectures and on-line assignments. There is a required 10 day international travel component to visit local and foreign invested businesses in one country located in the Pacific Rim or in South America. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

BUS 687 International Business Travel Course

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. International business travel course; content of course changes every semester. May be repeated for credit once. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 690 Graduate Internship

P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

BUS 692 Special Topics in International Business

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Selected topics International Business. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 693 Special Topics in Marketing

Prerequisite, BUS 605, or EMBA 605. Selected topics in marketing. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 694 Special Topics in Finance

Prerequisite, BUS 607, or EMBA 607. Selected topics in finance. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 695 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Selected topics in entrepreneurship. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 696 Special Topics in Business

Prerequisite, BUS 604, or EMBA 604. Selected topics in business. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

BUS 699 Independent Research

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, completion of all core course work. Individual study and research is offered to students to research particular topics that are not provided for by regular curriculum offerings. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Economics

ECON 561 Introduction to Mathematical Economics

Prerequisites, MATH 110, ECON 350, or equivalent. Fundamental methods of mathematical economics and microeconomic theory – including partial derivatives, constrained optimization, consumer choice, duality theory, intertemporal optimization, and risk. Graduate students will be assigned one third more work compared to the undergraduate students’ section. These additional requirements include, readings, homework problems, topics, and exam questions. Graduate students will also be expected to demonstrate greater overall mastery of the core material required of all students. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ECON 564 Game Theory

(Same as CS 564.) Prerequisites, MATH 210, ECON 464, or equivalent. This course presents a rigorous treatment of selected topics in game theory, a field that examines environments in which the payoffs from an individual's actions depend upon the actions of others. The course objective is to acquaint students with the analytical and quantitative methods of game theory so that they may apply game theory to strategic problems across a wide range of disciplines. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ECON 582 Economic Systems Design II: Case Studies and Analysis

Prerequisite, ECON 481, or MATH 370. This course is intended to involve students in designing specific allocation mechanisms for specific problems. Students will be required to design and develop a mechanism to a specific allocation problem. Students must develop an analytical model, literature review, and testbed for their mechanism. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

ECON 596 Special Topics in Economics

Prerequisites, TBD by the instructor and course topic. In-depth study of a specific area; content of course changes each semester. May be repeated once. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ECON 599 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Independent research course individually designed to meet specific needs of graduate students. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ECON 683 Economic Systems Design III

Prerequisites, ECON 481, 582. Students will be required to synthesize their knowledge of economic systems design and experimental economics and apply it to a real world problem. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

ECON 685 Economic Systems Design Lab I

Laboratory to design and test resource allocation mechanisms. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

ECON 686 Economic Systems Design Lab II

Prerequisite, ECON 685. Laboratory to implement and redesign allocation mechanisms. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

ECON 689 Seminar in Economic Science

Students required to pre-read papers presented by various speakers, attend their seminars, ask intelligent questions and summarize the content and importance of the seminar. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 2 credits.

ECON 691 Economic Systems Design Thesis I

Prerequisite, ECON 481, or 683. Laboratory to implement and redesign allocation mechanisms. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

ECON 692 Economic Systems Design Thesis II

Prerequisite, successful proposal defense of thesis. Laboratory to implement and redesign allocation mechanisms. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

Course Descriptions – Executive MBA

EMBA 600 Creating and Sustaining Competitive Advantage

Prerequisite, EMBA student. This five-day seminar launches the Executive MBA Program. Its main focus is on the requirements for sustaining superior firm performance. Topics include competitive advantage and venture analysis, performance measurement, international strategy, leadership, and ethics. The seminar includes a day visit to manufacturing plants in Mexico. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

EMBA 601 Economic Analysis and Policy

Corequisite, EMBA 600. This course presents the fundamental economic concepts and models in microeconomics and macroeconomics with particular emphasis on economic analysis of public policy issues. In microeconomics, markets and government failures are discussed using models of competitive and monopolistic markets. In macroeconomics, the determination of output, employment, and price levels are discussed using the aggregate supply and demand model, and the effects of alternative policies are analyzed. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 602 Financial Information Systems

Corequisite, EMBA 600. This course focuses on financial reporting and management accounting systems and is intended for the manager who wishes to effectively read, understand, and use the information presented in published and internal accounting reports. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 603 Applied Statistics

Prerequisite, EMBA 600. In the increasingly competitive worldwide business environment, successful companies rely upon quantitative methods for data analysis and decision-making. This course provides the statistical tools managers need to understand and use in business situations. Among the topics covered will be sampling, estimation, inference, hypotheses testing, regression analysis, smoothing, time series decomposition, and qualitative forecasting. EMBAs will learn how and when to apply statistics and how to interpret statistical results. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

EMBA 604 Managing Effective Organizations

Prerequisite, EMBA 601. For organizations to create value they must have the capability to react to market opportunities quickly. This course introduces the tools, techniques, and skills necessary to increase the capacity of firms to do that. Building on insights from economics, this course teaches students how to align incentives, identify and change employee preferences, assign decision rights, and select and retain appropriate employees. Most importantly, this course will describe how a firm can be designed and managed to reduce the bureaucratic behavior that destroys value in organizations. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 605 Marketing Management

Prerequisites, EMBA 601, 602, 603. This course focuses on the unfilled wants and needs of customers and creates solutions that satisfy these individuals in order to fulfill organizational objectives. In the highly competitive global environment, market-oriented thinking and sound marketing management can make the difference between success and failure. EMBA students examine such topics as market segmentation, buyer behavior, promotion, distribution, and competitive restraints. The course features a marketing simulation project. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 606 Operations and Technology Management

Prerequisites, EMBA 602, 603. In this course, students analyze the management of operations and technology in both production and service industries. Topics include operation and project management, information management, product and process design, and total quality management. Students examine the tradeoffs involved in operation decisions and the application of software tools to solve these problems. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 607 Managerial Finance

Prerequisites, EMBA 601, 602, 603. This emphasizes the analysis of the current/future practices and issues in the course area of corporate finance through seminar presentations and case studies. Topics include valuation models, capital structure, capital budgeting, cost of capital, investment decisions, mergers and acquisitions, and international finance. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 608 Advanced Corporate Finance

Prerequisite, EMBA 607. This is an applied course in corporate finance that emphasizes detailed description of the valuation process. It provides an integrated, comprehensive method for valuing assets, firms, and securities across a variety of industries. The course begins with a review of financial and accounting techniques, proceeds with the valuation process, leading to the development of pro-forma financial statements and the translation of these projections into values. Topics include valuation tools (time value of money, CAPM, NPV), financial statement analysis (estimating free cash flow), risk analysis, capital structure theories, cost of capital, equity valuation, and debt valuation. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

EMBA 611 Understanding the Global Business Environment

Prerequisites, EMBA 605, 607. Students acquire analytical skills to assess the dynamic nature of the globalization process, including the ability to relate course concepts to current international news events, and to integrate such knowledge structures into value-creation strategies for global organizations. Students will also develop the ability to apply international business concepts, via case study analysis, to problems and challenges facing firms which compete in the global economy. The course features a two week international residential, typically in the Pacific Rim, where though a variety of corporate visits, students will gain in-depth knowledge of the challenges and opportunities facing businesses in that region. (Offered summer.) 6 credits.

EMBA 612 Strategic Management

Prerequisites, EMBA 605, 606, 607. This course relies heavily on the case method of instruction to apply strategic analysis techniques. Students focus on the requirements for sustaining competitive advantage and the implications of these requirements for market positioning, diversification, acquisitions, joint ventures, corporate restructuring, and other decisions that can significantly affect firm value. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

EMBA 614 Business and Public Policy

Prerequisites, EMBA 604, 605, 607. The study of public policy formation, including public choice theory, at both the national and international levels. Students will learn to design a specific public policy proposal and are responsible for advocating adoption of the proposal. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EMBA 640 Corporate Governance and Control

Prerequisite, EMBA 601. Study of the constraints designed to make managers and directors act in their shareholders’ interest. Topics covered include choice of legal form of organization, ownership structure, corporate charter provisions including voting rules, anti-takeover measures, stakeholders and corporate social responsibility, the proxy process, board of directors, CEO compensation, CEO performance evaluation, CEO retention and succession, and boundaries of the firm and international corporate governance. Emphasis is placed on how optimal practice vary across industry, strategy and country, and on how they evolve through time. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

EMBA 680 Distinguished Speaker Series

Prerequisite, EMBA student. The student will attend a number of lectures, seminars, symposia, and conferences that present current information about various economic and business issues. The topics covered will vary over the entire curriculum of the program. (The course begins at the beginning of the EMBA program and continues over the entire 21 months of the program.) (Offered as needed.) 0 credit.

EMBA 696 Elective

Selected Topics. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

Course Descriptions – Management Science

MGSC 530 Computational Economics

(Same as CPSC 430, CS 531.) Prerequisites, MATH 110, and CPSC 230, or 236, or consent of instructor. This course will introduce students to the computational tools required to understand electronic exchange systems and implement economic experiments. Students will be required to become familiar with numerical analysis, computer simulation and programming of experiments. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

Please note:

A course designated with a "P" following the number (e.g. BUS 600P) in the course schedule indicates that it is a course offered in Prague.